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eBook Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Fiction, Classics, Literary download

by Joseph Conrad

eBook Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Fiction, Classics, Literary download ISBN: 159224646X
Author: Joseph Conrad
Publisher: Wildside Press; Large type / large print edition edition (May 1, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 132
ePub: 1335 kb
Fb2: 1460 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mbr doc txt doc
Category: Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure

Note on Joseph Conrad, Map of Congo Free State, The World of Joseph Conrad, Inspired by Heart of Darkness, and . 1865 Conrad’s mother dies of tuberculosis. Conrad first experiences English literature through his father’s translations of Shakespeare

1865 Conrad’s mother dies of tuberculosis. Conrad first experiences English literature through his father’s translations of Shakespeare. 1869 Conrad’s father dies, also of tuberculosis; Conrad is adopted by his maternal uncle, Tadeusz Bobrowski, who lives in Poland.

Similar to Joseph Conrad's better-known Heart of Darkness, this autobiographical short story, by Joseph Conrad, depicts a young man's first journey to the East

Similar to Joseph Conrad's better-known Heart of Darkness, this autobiographical short story, by Joseph Conrad, depicts a young man's first journey to the East. Youth is a haunting tale about ill omens, the passing of time and the making of a man. Five men sit around a mahogany table, drinking claret.

The topic is the same as that of Heart of Darkness, but in this case Conrad is more objective and less ambiguous

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. The topic is the same as that of Heart of Darkness, but in this case Conrad is more objective and less ambiguous. Latin America is shown as a highly unstable region, but it is as much a land of ideals and self-sacrifice as it is one of corruption.

Joseph Conrad (1857 - 1924) was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the . The book is highly autobiographical. In Heart of Darkness Conrad describes a man who has looked deeply into his soul

He joined the British merchant marine in 1878, and was granted British citizenship in 1886. Conrad was a river boat captain in the Congo during the time that the area was being highly exploited for its Ivory. In Heart of Darkness Conrad describes a man who has looked deeply into his soul. This deep introspection and understanding into the deepest depths of human depravity had been seen by Mr. Kurtz.

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad Classic 20th-Century Penguin ISBN:0140186522.

Reading Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad is a lot like running a 5K (. miles) race. For me, the first part of the story was initially hard to get into because I found it difficult to adjust to Conrad’s dense writing style, and I found myself confused by Conrad's use of one narrator to begin the story and then the shift in point of view to the character of Marlow telling his own story.

Though he did not speak English fluently until his twenties, he was a master prose stylist who brought a non-English sensibility into English literature

Heart of Darkness book. Although his job was to transport ivory downriver, Heart of Darkness, a novel by Joseph Conrad, was originally a three-part series in Blackwood's Magazine in 1899.

Heart of Darkness book. It is a story within a story, following a character named Charlie Marlow, who recounts his adventure to a group of men onboard an anchored ship.

Heart of Darkness grew out of a journey Joseph Conrad took up the Congo River; the verisimilitude that the great novelist thereby brought to his most famous tale everywhere enhances its dense and shattering power. Apparently a sailor’s yarn, it is in fact a grim parody of the adventure story, in which the narrator, Marlow, travels deep into the heart of the Congo where he encounters the crazed idealist Kurtz and discovers that the relative values of the civilized and the primitive are not what they seem.

A novella about a voyage up the Congo River into the Congo Free State, in the heart of Africa, as told by the story's narrator Marlow. Marlow tells his story to friends aboard a boat anchored on the River Thames, London, England. This setting provides the frame for Marlow's story of his obsession with the ivory trader Kurtz, which enables Conrad to create a parallel between London and Africa as places of darkness.

Comments: (3)
Uleran
Conrad's language is impeccable. He writes in a crisp, precise and succinct manner. And this novella is perhaps one of his grandest works. It served as the backbone of the plot of "Apocalypse Now." This epic Oliver Stone movie about Viet Nam was fully adapted from Conrad's tale.

The book is highly autobiographical. Conrad was a river boat captain in the Congo during the time that the area was being highly exploited for its Ivory. He observed cruelties and horrors that were not fully comprehendible by modern man. He endured sickness and hardship; which ultimately destroyed his health to the point that he had to give up his river runs in the Congo. But his memories and his hatred of what he saw was intact.

In Heart of Darkness Conrad describes a man who has looked deeply into his soul. This deep introspection and understanding into the deepest depths of human depravity had been seen by Mr. Kurtz. He had looked at them with eyes wide open and integrated the most horrible of humanity into his experience. The book drips with references to death. Yet the references are not superfluous.

The book shows the horror of the exploitation of the Europeans. They did all and more than the Americans did in the era of slavery. The cruelest of cruelty. The most abominable conditions. The death and destruction. All of it was present in the Congo as well. And Conrad saw it, up close and personal.

The book is truly a classic. It is nice to have a hard cover edition around. It is recommended to all serious readers of English and American literature.
Bort
t is well written. The idea of a storyteller in the story is not unique but very effective. We could ponder over the word darkness for quite some time. The best way to ponder is with Cliff's Notes. Personally I wanted him to get on with it. I guess I was a little impatient for the action and the conclusion. If it hadn't been for cliff notes I would have missed haft the things he was implying.

A merchant company is missing an agent Kurtz, and Marlowe must find him. Traveling though harsher environments than he imagined possible he may have found what he was seeking. As with many of this type of epic the physical distance or direction is not as important then the transformation it plays on ones soul.

I missed this book somehow in school. The reason I started to read this book before actually I actually became immersed in it, was to see how close it came to the movie. No not the movie you are thinking of. "Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death" (1988). The film was shot primarily in the avocado groves maintained by the University of California at Riverside (UCR), which the university uses for horticultural experiments. Adrienne Barbeau is Dr. Kurtz.
The horror.....the horror.....

Cannibal Women in the Avocado Jungle of Death
Gaiauaco
Ok, so I usually give books a chance, even if they are a class assignment but this book just made me aggravated. I mean it seems to enforce the strategy of using 40 words when 1 will do and just goes on and on and on. I mean I know that this book is classic and Conrad is an acquired taste but I just couldn't stand having to get through it. The only reason I was able to finish it at all was because I had the flu and was half delirious so I wasn't paying attention to what I was reading anyways (although this was only for the last 50 pages of it and my edition had like 180 pages). Anyways, I understand this is supposed to be a classic. It just isn't my taste.