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eBook Shakespeare and the goddess of complete being download

by Ted Hughes

eBook Shakespeare and the goddess of complete being download ISBN: 0571166040
Author: Ted Hughes
Publisher: Faber and Faber; 1st edition (1992)
Language: English
Pages: 517
ePub: 1885 kb
Fb2: 1213 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt mbr lrf lit
Category: Literature
Subcategory: This . . . Is About Life: Book I: Cherish Your Beginning

Ted Hughes sees Shakespeare's early poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape . In a sense Goddess of Complete Being is impressive, like in the same way that Graves's White Goddess is impressive (.

Ted Hughes sees Shakespeare's early poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece as embodying two great myths of the archaic world, that of the hero who rejects the love of the Goddess and is killed in revenge by a boar; and that of the king, or god, whose crime is rape and whose punishment is banishment. One of the last books written by Ted Hughes, this monumental piece of literary criticism aims to show connections between the plots and imagery of many of Shakespeare's plays. "Wow, psilocybin is a hell of a drug!

Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being is a book of literary criticism authored by Ted Hughes. Hughes has extensively discussed the poems and other literary works of Shakespeare in this book.

Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being is a book of literary criticism authored by Ted Hughes. The book is written in three parts: Part one: The Immature Phase of the Tragic Equation, Part two: The Evolution of the Tragic Equation through the Seven Tragedies. Part three: The Transformation of the Tragic Equation in the Last Plays. The book also provides an insight into Ted Hughes' gender attitudes.

The most important clue to Ted Hughes’ gender attitudes is provided by his Shakespeare the Goddess . This book henceforth Shakespeare.

The most important clue to Ted Hughes’ gender attitudes is provided by his Shakespeare the Goddess of Complete Being, where he says for instance that. The peculiar division of the sexes, which bestows on woman the miraculous power to create man out of her blood, while it deprives man of any such ability, and which deposits the infant male, through his helpless, formative years, into the possessive control of the Female, injects a peculiar conflict into the situation. Ted Hughes, Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being (London: Faber, 1992) 327.

Third, Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being is possibly Hughes’s most sustained prose work, and an occasionally brilliant one. In these nearly 600 pages of literary cadenzas it’s as if the lunatic, the lover and the poet are of imagination all compact. A celebrated footnote about the boar that gores Adonis in Venus and Adonis gives a flavour of the whole

Publisher: First published in 1992, Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being has subsequently .

Publisher: First published in 1992, Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being has subsequently taken on a mythic life of its own. Dismissed at the time by some scholars. In this respect, Hughes’ analysis is similar to Beryl Pogson’s approach presented in her book entitled In the East My Pleasure Lies (published in 1950). Hughes has attempted to extract the narrative by assuming that the key to its unlocking is provided by Shakespeare in Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece.

Hughes, Ted. A Choice of Shakespeare’s Verse, (Faber & Faber, 1979, revised and enlarged 1991). The Jew of Malta Milton, John.

The Book of Job. The Complete Poetry & Prose of William Blake. Hughes, Ted. St. Ignatius of Loyola. Exercitia spiritualia, (1548).

Ted Hughes, the poet laureate of England since 1984, has written a stimulating and erudite study in which he. .

Ted Hughes, the poet laureate of England since 1984, has written a stimulating and erudite study in which he adopts a mythic approach to Shakespeare’s poems and middle and late plays. An important part of Hughes book is his application of the archetypal elements from these myths to the growing strife in England’s religious and political life during Shakespeare’s career. Hughes sees the innate power of the myths as not only dramatized in the plays but also lived out in the conflicts between the forces leading to the English Civil War.

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authored by Ted Hughes. Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being.

This critical work on Shakespeare attempts to show his complete works - dramatic and poetic - as a single, tightly-integrated, evolving organism. Identifying Shakespeare's use in the poems "Venus and Adonis" and "The Rape of Lucrece", of the two most significant religious myths of the archaic world, Hughes argues that these myths later provided Shakespeare with templates for the construction of every play from "All's Well that Ends Well" to "The Tempest". He also argues that this development, in turn, represented his poetic exploration of conflicts within the "living myth" of the English Reformation. The claim is a large one, but Hughes supports his thesis with a painstakingly close analysis of language, plots and characters.
Comments: (7)
Uaoteowi
“Shakespeare and the Goddess of Complete Being” brings us closer to understanding the Bard’s writings. Ted Hughes has intuitively perceived that Shakespeare’s plays are linked together and constitute a single narrative. In this respect, Hughes’ analysis is similar to Beryl Pogson’s approach presented in her book entitled “In the East My Pleasure Lies” (published in 1950).

Hughes has attempted to extract the narrative by assuming that the key to its unlocking is provided by Shakespeare in “Venus and Adonis” and “The Rape of Lucrece”. Hughes treats these two long poems as an illustration of two sequential events. These events are taking place on two planes, mythical and rational. The first event illustrates the hero who rejects the love of the Goddess and is killed in revenge by a boar. This event leads to the second one, in which the hero rapes an earthly incarnation of the Goddess and is punished for his crime by banishment. Hughes has merged these two events into what he calls the Tragic Equation, a linear formula that, according to him, forms the skeleton of Shakespeare’s canon.

By applying his tragic equation, Hughes has been successful in unlocking a few episodes of Shakespeare’s plays, which otherwise remain invisible to the rational mind. For example, he was able to trace down the origin of Caliban (“The Tempest”), to deduct the presence of the Third Duke in “As You Like It”, and to identify Parolles as a distracting inner self of Bertram in “All’s Well That Ends Well”. At the same time, and very much like Mrs Pogson, Hughes completely misunderstood the functionality of several other characters. According to Hughes, Lucio in “Measure for Measure” is “the priapic demon”; and melancholy Jaques in “As You Like It” is Shakespeare himself. Then he reversed the roles of Gertrude in “Hamlet”, Don Pedro in “Much Ado About Nothing”, and (like every writer, critic, and scholar before him) allowed himself to get into Iago’s trap in “Othello”.

Hughes’ misunderstanding is caused by a couple of imprecisions that have crept into his thinking pattern. The first imprecision is related to the overall functionality of Hughes’ equation. Namely, his equation describes a sort of a vicious circle. Hughes’ fascination with and knowledge of ancient mysteries have allowed him to identify such a vicious circle within the myths and other occult traditions. The ancient myths and occult ceremonies are a record of an evolutionary disruption that was caused by an event that occurred in antiquity. As a result of this antiquated event, humanity ended-up in evolutionary chaos. But these mythical episodes belong to the past. It seems that Hughes does not realize that, in the meantime, the situation has changed. The mythical or archetypal forces do not operate anymore in the same manner. Shakespeare dedicated his writings to illustrate how it was possible to break out of that mythical chaos and bring humanity back on the right track. This constructive change is symbolically marked by Shakespeare in his first long poem as Adonis rejecting Venus. Hughes has perceived the significance of this episode (e.g., page 61: “The god, who, throughout history and prehistory, had loved the Goddess of Love as totally and unconditionally as she loved him, had suddenly ... rejected her. This abrupt innovation crackles with outrage. The ancient momentum of the great myth has been brought to a dead halt ... .”) But Hughes misinterpreted this change. Hughes employed his erudition combined with quite an impressive intellectual gymnastic to reverse Shakespeare’s illustration and bring it back into the ancient chaotic mode. What Hughes did not perceive in Shakespeare’s plays is the presence of constructive forces. Hughes’ tragic equation does not include these constructive forces. This is why his equation is not complete. By their very nature, the constructive forces manifest themselves in a subtler and gentler manner. In the plays they are overshadowed by more dynamic and boorish destructive forces. The constructive forces are intentionally presented in such a way that they are invisible to the rational mind.

Without these constructive forces, Shakespeare is not Shakespeare anymore. This is further illustrated in “Two Noble Kinsmen”, where the constructive forces have been deliberately removed. In this way, Shakespeare provided a contrast play to help the audiences, and his readers, to recognize the subtle forces in his other plays. Hughes perceived the sterility of “Two Noble Kinsmen” (page 564: “And yet it lacks something essential, that Shakespeare normally puts there. … It is psychologically static.”) But again, he misunderstood the purpose of this deliberately sterilized play (page 565: “As a result, the tremendous athlete, resting under his mulberry, never even got into condition for the job”).

The second imprecision of Hughes’ analysis is his disregard for the times and places in which the plays are set-up. He has assumed that the plays are independent of time and place. But this is not so. The plays are aligned along a very precise historical and geographical route. They illustrate from where, how, and when - evolutionary forces were gradually brought to Western Europe.

Despite these imprecisions, Hughes’ analysis marks a significant progress towards a fuller understanding of Shakespeare’s cannon. It brings Shakespearean critical analysis onto a higher level, i.e., above the background noise generated by the sterile rationality of orthodox scholarship.
Truthcliff
I am going slowly, slowly through this book as it is so intense, scholarly, and brilliant. And when I get to the end of a section, I think I need to go back and read it again. But so highly worthwhile. This is certainly a book on Shakespeare and the Goddess but it is also a history of the search for understanding in the Western tradition, its sources, and its various manifestations. Ted Hughes....really, how is it that one person can know so much?!
SoSok
There is nothing else like this. While I don't necessarily agree with every line he writes, Hughes' viewpoint is absolutely indispensible on the Shakespeare criticism shelf.

Can't grasp Shakespeare? Can't get a handle on him? Read this and have a feast. You will come away vastly enriched in appreciation of the Bard.

It's hard to summarize and I'm not making an Olympian effort here, but he's basically saying that there's a theme running through nearly all Shakespeare's works, and it begins with the two early poems, Venus and Adonis, and the Rape of Lucrece. Two responses to "the Goddess," ie to sexuality or to women. He hauls in neoplatonism, myth, psychology, stretches the point wrt some of the plays, but all in all it sheds a light like no other. There's hell to pay if you reject the goddess, and there's hell to pay if you force her.

Hughes shows how it plays out in the various works, and tries to show how it evolved (this is where it gets dubious). He makes assumptions as to chronology (who does not?) His theory gets too elaborate and maybe goes out of control and tries to eat everything in sight.

Nevertheless -- for heaven's sake, read it. I don't know of ANY other work on Shakespeare's output that I'd call indispensible. This is.

And while I'm at it, many thanks to Barnes and Noble for their B&N Rediscovers editions, reprinting htf works of "special merit" in affordable hardcover.

This is a book you'll return to, if you enjoy Shakespeare...and if you don't yet, this might change your mind.
Anen
The book is a great way to obtain insight into the works of Shakespeare's work
The Rollers of Vildar
still working on it.
Jan
Actually I got this as a gift for my daughter, so I can't really rate it.
Fiarynara
A rich, rewarding book for anyone who takes the time and is able to follow Mr. Hughes exhaustively argued thesis. In some ways it is a bookend to Robert Graves "White Goddess" and those who enjoyed the one will enjoy the other. Ted Hughes mines very deep veins of poetic ore, his analysis of the thematic connections between the plays are fascinating, and whether or not we accept that Shakespeare was consciously organizing his magnum opus in the way Hughes expounds or not (it may have all been subconscious) this book reminds us once again of the enormous range of Shakespeare's poetic gifts. It is a brilliant book and just as the White Goddess has migrated from the furthest reaches of the forest of prose to the campfires of many a modern poet and writer so Hughes' book will stand the test of time and be returned to again and again. It is a powerful work and demands serious study. The sections where Ted Hughes discusses Shakespeare's "bifurcated language" and his discussion of the mythological underpinnings of the masque in The Tempest are worth the price of the book alone. Take time over this one - there is much to be savoured.