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eBook Planet Simpson: How A Cartoon Masterpiece Defined A Generation download

by Chris Turner

eBook Planet Simpson: How A Cartoon Masterpiece Defined A Generation download ISBN: 0306813416
Author: Chris Turner
Publisher: Da Capo Press; Export Ed edition (October 12, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 464
ePub: 1734 kb
Fb2: 1774 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf rtf mbr lit
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Television

Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, also abbreviated to Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation.

Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, also abbreviated to Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation, is a non-fiction book about The Simpsons, written by Chris Turner and originally published on October 12, 2004 by Random House. The book is partly a memoir and an exploration of the impact The Simpsons has had on popular culture.

Chris Turner is an award-winning magazine journalist. This is a book that is supposed to be about how the Simpsons defined a generation, but it was more about how the Simpsons defined the authors

Chris Turner is an award-winning magazine journalist. His pop culture and technology reporting and essays for Shift magazine earned him six National Magazine Awards in the last three years, including the President's Medal for General Excellence in 2001-the highest honor in Canadian magazine writing. He is also a regular contributor of culture and technology reporting to Time and The Globe & Mail. Turner lives in Alberta. This is a book that is supposed to be about how the Simpsons defined a generation, but it was more about how the Simpsons defined the authors. So much is about pop culture, but it is very skewered to the author's tastes.

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His book is just the thing for fellow fans, and for anyone interested in how pop . Planet Simpson was a fairly enjoyable read Chris Turner is an award-winning magazine journalist.

His book is just the thing for fellow fans, and for anyone interested in how pop phenomena came to b. -Hollywood Reporter This book was not prepared, licensed, approved, or endorsed by any entity involved in creating or producing the television series "The Simpsons. Planet Simpson was a fairly enjoyable read. Turner's career is in journalism and it shows. Chris Turner is an award-winning magazine journalist.

Planet Simpson is the first boo. Planet Simpson is the first book to bring in-depth analysis to that most important pop-cultural institution of the last decade-Fox TV's The Simpsons-and use the show as a microcosm of the Western culture it has hilariously (and mercilessly) influenced and reflected.

Chris Turner lives in Toronto and is a freelance journalist

Chris Turner lives in Toronto and is a freelance journalist. Within the pages of this book you can really see how much 'The Simpsons' is a perfect, albeit odd, view of today's realities. The book shows how 'The Simpsons' is a smart show that's funny for everyone from dumb to Einstein.

0 2 5 Author: Chris Turner Narrator: Oliver Wyman.

Planet Simpson is the first book to bring in-depth analysis to that most important pop-cultural institution of the last decade-Fox TV's The . Planet Simpson : How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation.

Planet Simpson is the first book to bring in-depth analysis to that most important pop-cultural institution of the last decade-Fox TV's The Simpsons-and use th. .

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Planet Simpson is the first book to bring in-depth analysis to that most important pop-cultural institution of the last decade-Fox TV's "The Simpsons"-and use the show as a microcosm of the Western culture it has hilariously (and mercilessly) reflected and influenced. In an age of unprecedented transformation, "The Simpsons" alone has had the depth, intelligence, scope, and, most importantly, humor to chart the links between popular culture and the world we live in. Planet Simpson is broken down into scathingly funny chapters analyzing each major character's relationship to different facets of the American character: Homer Simpson, the ultimate everyman of the American century; Lisa Simpson, the voice of the show's social conscience; Bart Simpson, punk icon; Marge Simpson, maternal voice of moral authority and anchor of Simpsons family values; C. Montgomery Burns, unchecked capitalism personified…and every bit character on down from Barney to Smithers to Krusty the Clown, coupled with intelligent, friendly, and entertaining analysis of the show's greater themes. Going well beyond a critical discussion of a single television program, Planet Simpson will use "The Simpsons" as a window on the culture at large to deliver first-hand reportage of the Internet boom, the alternative-rock explosion, the triumph of irony, the cultural origins of anti-globalization, and other defining events and trends of our accelerated, confounding era.
Comments: (7)
Arador
If you love Simpsons you will like it.
Nikojas
This is one of my favorite books that I have purchased. The author does an excellent job of comparing either an episode or a character to the subject that he is comparing it to. He adds quotes from the show in his writing that helps one to enjoy reading this book. If you are a fan of the show I am sure that you'll enjoy this book.
tref
Perfect book that reflects on the seemingly symbiotic relationship between pop culture and The Simpsons. The author reviews the various characters and situations from the show which reflect the issues of the day in many surprising ways. It gives a view on The Simpsons that most basic viewers never notice. The Simpsons is a lot deeper than you'd imagine and more intricate than only one viewing can show you. Adn in turn, as 'The Simpsons' were a reflection of society, society is increasingly a partial reflection of 'The Simpsons'. Within the pages of this book you can really see how much 'The Simpsons' is a perfect , albeit odd, view of today's realities. The book shows how 'The Simpsons' is a smart show that's funny for everyone from dumb to Einstein. (And based on that bit of horrible English, I'm moving towards the former)Definitely a great pick for a serious Simpsons Fan.

Now if they would just hurry and make that movie they've always talked about...
Hadadel
Book is perfect. Can't wait to read.
Akta
Nothing special - needed it for class.

Be detailed and specific. What would you have wanted to know before you purchased the product?

Not too short and not too long. Aim for between 75 and 300 words.
Xanzay
I'm a bit late in the game here, this book is over 10 years old. But, it exists and others may want to read it at this time. If you love LONG books that go on and on about topics that could have been far better had the author been brief, then this is the book for you. This is a book that is supposed to be about how the Simpsons defined a generation, but it was more about how the Simpsons defined the authors. So much is about pop culture, but it is very skewered to the author's tastes. I am perhaps 3 years younger than the author and wasn't "in" to the same things he was during the 1990s (which is a HUGE part of the book). Does this indicate I wasn't part of the generation, or that only the author was cool? What I would say is if you are interested in an autobiography of Chris Turner and how the Simpsons influenced HIM, then read it. If not, I don't think it is even worth the penny they are currently charging for it.
Malodor
This is easily one of the most entertaining audiobooks I have listened to in a long time. The book is filled with quotes from the Simpson, and the narrator does great Simpson impersonations. The narrative has a seemingly endless number of anecdotes from Simpson's episodes (all referenced by episode number.) To a fan of the show, these references bring back fond memories. The book excels when it operates as a Simpsons fan companion.

Unfortunately, it falls flat when it tries to dig deeper. The arguments come across as those from a serious fan of the show trying to justify it's importance by placing it in external paradigms. Many of the arguments could easily be applied to just about any other aspect of pop culture. (The Fruit Loops Generation?) The insight that pop culture has become a strong identifying factor in a fragmenting society is interesting, but by no means original. The strange irony is that a corporate entity is needed to provide a unifying force for a youth culture rebelling against the corporatism of society. For a Simpsons fan like the author, Simpsons serves as that force, and the thesis of this book will apply. However, for others, including those that have a shared interest in the Simpsons and other things, the argument falls flat.
I like the Simpsons.
I like Canada.
I like media critiques, cultural critiques, and especially social analysis of pop-culture phenomena.
I work with academic research every day.
I deal with plenty of leftist politics, given where I live.

But I didn't like this book at all. Two parts Simpsons-fan one-upsmanship, two parts journo trying to overwrite his way to academic credibility, one part irrelevant Canadiana, and one part the "Don't you hate George W. Bush? Man, I hate George W. Bush. Doesn't everyone hate George W. Bush?" trope so common in early-'00s book releases with little topical connection to the U.S. president of the time, more intended to establish the author's cool factor than provide any information.

He could've written a great social history by removing himself from the narrative and cutting the overwriting back one notch. I assume he knows this, given his professional success. I'm stuck with the conclusion that he didn't want to.