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eBook Cracker (BFI TV Classics) download

by Mark Duguid

eBook Cracker (BFI TV Classics) download ISBN: 1844572633
Author: Mark Duguid
Publisher: British Film Institute; 2009 edition (May 15, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1130 kb
Fb2: 1181 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt lit mbr rtf
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Television

Cracker (BFI TV Classics) has been added to your Basket. It is richly illustrated with images from the series

Cracker (BFI TV Classics) has been added to your Basket. It is richly illustrated with images from the series. Mark Duguid's study of "Cracker" places the series in the context of TV crime drama, explores key themes such as morality and guilt; bereavement and grief, and the Hillsborough disaster and its aftermath, as well as focusing on the character of Fitz, and drawing on interviews with series creator Jimmy McGovern and producer.

Mark Duguid's illuminating study of Cracker traces the series' origins and development in the context of early 1990s television and .

Mark Duguid's illuminating study of Cracker traces the series' origins and development in the context of early 1990s television and places it in the contemporary social and political landscape. He has contributed to Sight& Sound magazine and to the Encyclopedia of Television (2004).

Duguid explores the series’ distinctive moral focus, paying particular attention to Cracker’s concerns with justice and the impact of bereavement and grief, most notably in McGovern’s impassioned engagement with the devastation caused by the Hillsborough disaster and its aftermath.

531 results for bfi classics. Cracker (BFI TV Classics),Mark Duguid. Cracker (BFI TV Classics), New Books.

The following is a list of episodes of the ITV drama series Cracker starring Robbie Coltrane and Geraldine Somerville. A total of five series (three main and two specials) were broadcast over the course of thirteen years

The following is a list of episodes of the ITV drama series Cracker starring Robbie Coltrane and Geraldine Somerville. A total of five series (three main and two specials) were broadcast over the course of thirteen years. Episodes varied in length from 50 minutes (series one-three) to 120 minutes (series four and five).

Duguid, Mark (2009-04-17). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan/BFI Publishing. uk/acatalog/info 11071. Cracker - may refer to: Cracker (food), a type of biscuit, usually salted or savory edible Cracker (mountain), a mountain peak in Glacier National Park Cracker (benchmark), located in the Lewis Range, Glacier National Park in the .

BFI Film and TV Classics. Mark Duguid's study unpicks Cracker's origins and development, its social and political context and its distinctive moral focus. British and Irish Cinema & Television.

Created by Jimmy McGovern. With Robbie Coltrane, Geraldine Somerville, Kieran O'Brien, Barbara Flynn. Dr Edward "Fitz" Fitzgerald is a criminal psychologist. He is rather anti-social and obnoxious but he has a gift for solving crimes. Thus he is employed as a consultant by the Manchester Police.

In this latest BFI TV Classics book, TV producer and writer Taylor Downing takes a critical look at The World at War, exploring, among other things: the style of the series; the ethos of the series to tell the story of ordinary people caught up in the war rather than a story of military campaigns.

In this latest BFI TV Classics book, TV producer and writer Taylor Downing takes a critical look at The World at War, exploring, among other things: the style of the series; the ethos of the series to tell the story of ordinary people caught up in the war rather than a story of military campaigns told by generals and admirals; the many claims.

Cracker (1993-1996; 2007) was one of the stand-out television series of the 1990s, reinvigorating the television crime drama and winning both critical plaudits and ratings success. In Fitz, its flawed, self-destructive, arrogant but brilliant criminal psychologist hero, the series created one of the decade’s most iconic characters, in the process turning Robbie Coltrane from a respected comic performer into an award-winning actor and a genuine star.

Cracker played freely with the conventions of the detective thriller, focusing less on the ‘who’ of crime than the ‘why’. As such it followed a Catholic preoccupation with deep motive and moral responsibility shared by Fitz and his creator Jimmy McGovern, the first and most dominant of the series’ three writers. Through three series and two specials, Cracker explored the causes and consequences of crime, while never losing sight of the moral choices made by its perpetrators. At the same time the series exposed the inherent dangers of a police force in pursuit not of justice but of ‘results’.

Mark Duguid’s illuminating study of Cracker traces the series’ origins and development in the context of early 1990s television and places it in the contemporary social and political landscape. Duguid explores the series’ distinctive moral focus, paying particular attention to Cracker’s concerns with justice and the impact of bereavement and grief, most notably in McGovern’s impassioned engagement with the devastation caused by the Hillsborough disaster and its aftermath. Combining detailed textual analysis with insights drawn from interviews with McGovern and producer Gub Neal, Duguid reveals how one of the angriest, toughest series of its time is also, paradoxically, one of the most compassionate.