carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann

eBook Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann download

by Lars Schandorff

eBook Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann download ISBN: 1906552568
Author: Lars Schandorff
Publisher: Quality Chess; 1 edition (May 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 250
ePub: 1520 kb
Fb2: 1204 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: azw txt lit docx
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Puzzles and Games

This item: Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann. Grandmaster Lars Schandorff reveals a bulletproof chess opening repertoire and lucidly explains how Black should play the middle and endgame.

This item: Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann. I believe the best tribute I can pay to this book is that, shortly after starting reading it, I felt the temptation to play the Caro-Kann. GM Zenon Franco Ocampos, Jaque Bf5 Caro-Kann.

Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann. 256 Pages · 2010 · . 7 MB · 911 Downloads ·English. If you're looking for a good introduction to the Caro-Kann, this is the book for you. Courage doesn't always roar. It's. The Caro-Kann: Move by Move. 74 MB·1,843 Downloads·New! Grandmaster Repertoire 5: The English Opening . 4 c5 - Volume Three. 32 MB·1,213 Downloads·New!

The Caro-Kann is less susceptible to such forcing lines - Black sets out to equalize in the opening, and win the game later.

The Caro-Kann is less susceptible to such forcing lines - Black sets out to equalize in the opening, and win the game later. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Electra (Aris & Phillips Classical Texts).

Instead, Schandorff puts together a very sound . Grandmaster Repertoire 7: The Caro-Kann. Quality Chess (2010). For me, anytime a new book on the Caro-Kann appears it is cause for celebration.

Instead, Schandorff puts together a very sound Caro-Kann repertoire that offers a mix of solid variations that also give reasonable chances to take the full point. Of course, that initial "feastî mentality more often than not turns into a famine state of mind. Why? Because most books on this opening fail to live up to expectations. Fortunately, I can finally let out a cheer since grandmaster Schandorffís book actually surpassed whatever expectations I might have harbored. Grandmaster Lars Schandorff reveals a bulletproof chess opening repertoire and lucidly explains how Black should play the middlegame and endgame.

Download books for free. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The Caro-Kann: Grandmaster Repertoire 7 reveals a bulletproof chess .

The Caro-Kann: Grandmaster Repertoire 7 reveals a bulletproof chess opening repertoire and lucidly explains how Black should play the middle and endgame. Grandmaster Lars Schandorff reveals a bulletproof chess opening repertoire and lucidly explains how Black should play the middle and endgame c6 Written by an eminent opening expert A rock-solid grandmaster repertoire. Lars Schandorff is a grandmaster from Denmark who is renowned for his opening preparation. Author: Lars Schandorff.

Grandmaster Repertoire 7 - The Caro-kann book. In chess the Caro-Kann opening is one of Black’s. Lars Schandorff is a chess grandmaster from Denmark who is renowned for his opening preparation.

Grandmaster Repertoire: The Caro-Kann Неизвестно 9781906552565 : In chess the Caro-Kann opening is one of Blacks most reliable answers to. .Grandmaster Repertoire: The Caro-Kann, Сейчас книги нет в продаже. Возможно появится в будущем. 4.

In chess the Caro-Kann opening is one of Black’s most reliable answers to 1.e4. It is a regular favorite of elite players, who know that computer-aided preparation now threatens the sharpest lines of the Sicilian or Ruy Lopez (at the very least with a forced draw). The Caro-Kann is less susceptible to such forcing lines – Black sets out to equalize in the opening, and win the game later.

Grandmaster Lars Schandorff reveals a bulletproof chess opening repertoire and lucidly explains how Black should play the middlegame and endgame.

Comments: (7)
Kupidon
For a moment I was tempted to give Lars' excellent treatise 4 instead of 5 stars because he omits the Smsylov-Karpov variation (...4.Nd7) from the book, so on consideration, I'll give it 5 stars instead of 6.

Seriously, this is a repertoire book in the truest sense of the word and Schandorff has convinced me to take up the ...4.Bf5 line in addition to ...4.Nd7 with his excellent and original analysis, in addition to the thoroughly annotated games.

This book has rekindled my passion in the Caro as I discovered I am not truly a Sicilian player -- I never felt 100% comfortable playing it and now know it will never be my staple reply to e4.

Ditto for ...1.e5 since there is just TOO much theory for a time-stretched businessman/dad like me to hunker down and impart at this stage of life.

But that's really superfluous since the Caro rocks! There's nothing like watching an aggressive e4 player hit his head on the stone that is the Caro-Kann.

The Caro is a super solid weapon for positional players like me that allows for vigorous counter-attack. As you'll see in many of the variations and annotated games, especially the extremely well covered lines of the Advance Variation, once the initiative passes over to Black, White's position can quickly cave in.

BUT... and this is a BIG caveat as Schandorff warns, you must know these lines of the Advance Variation COLD, particularly the forcing and tactical lines commencing with 4.Nc3, which Lars designates as "the Shirov Variation" after the adventurous Latvian/Russian tight-rope walker who popularized it. This line was pioneered to a large degree in the 1990s by Greek GM and author, Vasilios Kotronias and his then excellent book, "Beating the Caro-Kann."

If you do not know the theory of the Shirov Variation, then you should NOT play the Caro. But if you know the theory and understand the ideas, it is likely your opponent who will have something to fear, as there is a ton of scope for aggressive, tactical and often sacrificial play for Black. In fact, it is even necessary in many lines.

(Message to e4 players, the Caro-Kann is not the opening choice of wallflowers but fighters!)

NOTHING is left to chance in this book and it will be next to impossible for you to "get caught" in the opening.

Overview of what's covered:

* The Panov Attack (vigorous attacking lines offered for Black. i.e. NO transpositions to the Nimo-Indian.)
* The surprisingly dangerous (at club level) Exchange Variation
* The deceptively simple looking but venomous Short Variation in the Advance.
* The innocuous Two Knights
* The positionally refuted Bayonet Attack in the Advance Variation. (Often encountered in blitz chess.)
* The obscure Fantasy Varation (with transpositions to the Blackmar-Diemer (the choice of certain 'spaced out' club players, and dealt with on pg. 236, *not* in the chapter on the Fantasy).
* The KID reversed
* 2.b3 (obviously not a concern but this and all other "weird" choices are dealt with by Lars.)
* Even the outlandish but tricky 2.Nc3 followed by 3.Qf3
* And... of course, you will be completely equipped to handle the Classical (Steinitz) Variation with ...4.Bf5. (Note: I have not delved into these waters yet since I still play the line with ...4.Nd7 that Karpov championed for so many years. As I recall, Schandorff favors lines with K-side castling for Black.)

One of the best belly laughs I've had (okay...the only one) from an opening book comes with the variation, 2.f4. Schandorff: "Is White trying to play the Grand Prix Attack against the Caro?" (Okay, you may not share my amusement.)

As far as I'm concerned, this is now (2012) THE book on the Caro-Kann... far, far surpassing Egon Varnusz's long standing treatise on the Caro from the 1980s and the 2nd edition from the early 90s.

So, even if you're a ...4.Nd7 player in the main line, there is nothing to lament. Fortunately, it is not a variation as thick with theory as ...4.Bf5 and as long as you get in an early c5, and avoid sacs on f7 or e6 (unlike Kasparov against Deep Blue) by playing ...Nb6 first, there is nothing to fear. ...4.Nd7 is a variation of ideas and there are bountiful games online to keep you up to speed.

Moreover, and as mentioned, Lars delivers such clarity throughout that he's convinced me to take up the more ambitious line with ...4.Bf5.

Bottom line?

Lars Schandorff's "The Caro-Kann" is a deeply thought out repertoire book that is incisively written and explained. You'll have all the knowledge and confidence you need to face 1.e4 whether you're a 1600 player or even 2400.

This "fallen away" Caro player has returned.
Tantil
I've been playing the Caro-Kann as my main defense to 1.e4 for a few years.
I own over twenty books on the opening going back several decades. This is by far the best book on the Caro-Kann for those wishing to employ it as Black. It is repertoire book and so it doesn't cover ALL the critical lines, just those we'll face within the chosen repertoire. For a quick summary he commends 4...Bf5 and Kingside castling against 3.Nc3, he recommends the critical 3...Bf5 in the Advance, and the ...Nc6 "endgame" variation against the Panov-Botvinnik. For most of the 'minor lines' (e.g., the Fantasy, the Two Knights, KIA, etc.) Schandorff goes for the critical mainlines.

Schandorff gives many new ideas and is able to communicate his reasoning to the audience in a clear manner. I don't play ALL of the recommended lines, for example I prefer to castle queenside in the 3.Nc3 mainlines, but I think he makes a good argument for what he does recommend, and it often comes down to a matter of personal taste. However, he almost always chooses the most aggressive, combative lines which I think is both more fun to play and more challenging for our opponents. Many people think the Caro-Kann is passive or dull, but only those unfamiliar with the latest theory! This opening can lead to full-blooded, aggressive chess if you allow it. Afterall, 1...c6 is just a move, how the game develops is up to the BOTH players.

I think this book, combined with some independent study (perhaps Wells, Bologan's DVD, etc.) is enough to prepare players up to International Master strength.
Play the Caro-Kann and buy this book. You'll be glad you did.
Bliss
I just got this book in, and wanted to let anyone who might be considering a purchase to go for the 2nd print, it apparently has updates in it. I lucked into it not knowing anything about it.

For example in the Tal variation in the advance after:

1. e4 c6
2. d4 d5
3. e5 Bf5
4. h4 h5

5. Bg5!? Has been scoring well for white. I read a positive review somewhere (I think it was Jeremy Silman) that stated this line was not covered.

Well it is in the 2nd print.

Schandorff states this line is "...not especially dangerous" and recommends:

5...Qb6

And then gives:

6. Bd3 Bxd3
7. Qxd3 e6
8. Nd2 Qa3

(See the CK game Shirov vs. Anand)

Also fine according to Schandorff is 8 ...c5 and then he gives

9. c4 Bb4
10. b3 Ne7
11. Ngf3 Nf5
12. 0-0 0-0 =

GM's Akopian and Galkin have also both played this line.

As for the rest of the book in general, my initial impression is favorable. I had a look at the Shirov variation with Shredder 12 in analysis mode, and we both liked black's position.

Schandorff offers a gambit in at least one line here, but it appears to be a good one. You know when a chess engine likes a gambit, it's likely to be sound, as engines are notoriously materialistic.

I also looked briefly at the classical and short variations and liked what I saw there as well.

However bear in mind I've only had a few hours to look this book over, so take all of this with a grain of salt. My main purpose in getting this review up quickly was to let everyone know about the 2nd print upgrade.

I will try to update this review after I've had more time to read the book.