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eBook How to Open a Chess Game download

by Larry Evans

eBook How to Open a Chess Game download ISBN: 0890580030
Author: Larry Evans
Publisher: RHM Press (1974)
Language: English
Pages: 227
ePub: 1660 kb
Fb2: 1203 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: docx azw mobi rtf
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Puzzles and Games

Larry Evans is first at bat he covers the basic principles everyone should know and gives advice like don't bring out the . Paul Keres wraps the book up with a chapter on how he prepared some opening lines for tournaments at home

Larry Evans is first at bat he covers the basic principles everyone should know and gives advice like don't bring out the Queen too early or get adventerous with it, don't sacrifice your pieces unless you can see a way to get them back or force checkmate, don't play for traps, make just enough pawn moves to free up your. men no more, don't make useless checks. Paul Keres wraps the book up with a chapter on how he prepared some opening lines for tournaments at home. This is a very high quality book straight from the 1970's if your a beginner or intermediate what you can learn from them is timeless the book is in descriptive notation.

This book is plenty of fun to read. In it, seven very strong chess players discuss the question of how to open a chess game. We see some games where he opened 1 e4 c5 2 f4. And there's a great example of how not to play the Gruenfeld for Black, to demonstrate that one needs to know quite a few variations fairly well to be ready to play an opening line. The final chapter, by Paul Keres, shows how he prepared some lines at home for use in tournaments.

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Larry Melvyn Evans (March 22, 1932 – November 15, 2010) was an American chess grandmaster, author, and journalist. Chess Championship five times and the . Open Chess Championship four times. He wrote a long-running syndicated chess column and wrote or co-wrote more than twenty books on chess. He is not to be confused with Larry David Evans (b. 1952), another American chessmaster who was active in the 1970s and 1980s and achieved the International Master title.

a Chess Game-Evans, Larry - Free ebook download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read book online for free. Documents Similar To How to Open a Chess Game-Evans, Larry. Carousel Previous Carousel Next. 825 Classicial Chess Games Annotated.

How to Open a Chess Game-Evans, Larry - Free ebook download as PDF File . Uploaded by. Pradeep Sharma.

Start by marking How to open a chess game as Want to Read . This is one of the most interesting, most unusual and most instructive chess books ever written.

Start by marking How to open a chess game as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Seven of the World's Strongest Chess Grandmasters were each asked to write down their thoughts about how a serious chess amateur might best approach the problem of, very simply, "opening" a chess game? What makes this book especially great and useful is that each of these seven This is one of the most interesting, most unusual and most instructive chess books ever written.

This remarkable book-HOW TO OPEN A CHESS GAME-had its origin in our first chess book-SAN ANTONIO '7. 1 ney Fne d S"d ·. Publisher. How to open a chess game. Introduction by Larry Evans.

This remarkable book-HOW TO OPEN A CHESS GAME-had its origin in our first chess book-SAN ANTONIO '72. We had thrown a. party for the leading grandmasters at the San Antonio International. the board? How does he prepare for each contest?

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Players: Larry Evans vs W Young Game: Baltimore, 1948 4 moves to checkmate. 12 December at 07:00 ·. Puzzle of the day! Players: Larry Evans vs W Young Game: Baltimore, 1948. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español. 4 moves to checkmate. Puzzle 400086 - play free Chess matches at MyChessGame.

3 FREE chess books included!! * Paul Kere's, Larry Evan's, Gligoric, Bent Larsen, Tigran Petroisan, Vlastimil Hort, Lajos Portisch all give their thoughts and advice on how chess amateurs and beginners should handle the opening. Larry Evans covers the basic principles everyone should know. Tigran Petrosian covers how to study and learn opening theory and how to carefully examine lines and find improvements. Lajos Portisch on how to develop an opening repetoire with many useful suggestions. Svetozar Gligoric expands on the basic principles for intermediate players; Bent Larsen learning opening theory. Paul Keres wraps the book up with a chapter on how he prepared some opening lines for tournaments at home. Very high quality book straight from the 1970's, is timeless!! * If we're shipping to a USA address (sorry, but International shipping costs increases every 4 ounces). * The purchase of this item also qualifies you to receive THREE (3) FREE 'Thank you' Gifts from LabateChessPlus. We'll send you an email with our, as of Dec. 25, 2015, 53 FREE selections! * Purchase (2) two or more individually listed items, and I'll upgrade your USA shipping to Priority Mail (2-3 days delivery estimate) for free! * Additionally, when 'earning' Upgraded shipping, you also qualify for an ADDITIONAL "'Thank You' Gift". When you're done making your selections, please send me an email requesting that I 'correct' your shipping to Upgraded, as well as to let me know your choice of your " 'Thank You' Gift"!! * 23 hr shipping or quicker!! Safely packaged with delivery tracking, with confirmation email. * From a SMOKE-FREE home * Thank you for looking - Edward Labate, National Chess Master, Las Vegas, NV USA
Comments: (7)
Xarcondre
5 stars for content, 1 star for print quality. ISHI publishing needs to upgrade their quality control. The printing in this book (my copy anyway) varies from clear to unreadable in places. Had this book when it was first published. Lessons are just as valid today.
Acrobat
A superb book! Both theoretical and practical. A book that teaches the true principles of the opening stage and how others are a byproduct of them.
If you want to play the opening well buy this book!

If modern elite gms ever wrote a book like this one it would get 6 stars!
Its disadvantages are its descreptive(not algebraic) notation and the fact that it eas written in 1974
Truthcliff
Good product and good service.
Shliffiana
This book has a lot of sentimental value to me. I won my first important tournament by using ideas from this book! I recently ordered this out of print gem because I (literally ) wore out my first copy! In addition, it contains historical information and is a great read!
Vetalol
I bought this book at one of my first chess tournaments in 1975 and read it immediately. While there is much to recommend the book, at the time I was particularly impressed by Bent Larsen's chapter. For whatever reason, I've recently spotted various references to and quotes from that chapter in current articles and books. I was somewhat surprised that, after so many years, I vividly recalled every reference and quote I encountered. Because of these reminders, I dug out the book and reread the entire thing. After this review, I'm inclined to say that Larsen's chapter is the most provocatively brilliant piece of chess writing that I have ever encountered. Period. Full stop. No qualifications. Perhaps the most famous argument from this chapter is that White's trade his of d-pawn for Black's c-pawn in the Sicilian is justified only by White banking on Black falling for a cheap trick. If that goal is unsuccessful or unrealistic, the pawn trade is strategically unsound. This is just one of the many provocative gems in this brilliant essay, so many of which have informed my opinions for lo these many years.
romrom
I bought this book at one of my first chess tournaments in 1975 and read it immediately. While there is much to recommend the book, at the time I was particularly impressed by Bent Larsen's chapter. For whatever reason, I've recently spotted various references to and quotes from that chapter in current articles and books. I was somewhat surprised that, after so many years, I vividly recalled every reference and quote I encountered. Because of these reminders, I dug out the book and reread the entire thing. After this review, I'm inclined to say that Larsen's chapter is the most provocatively brilliant piece of chess writing that I have ever encountered. Period. Full stop. No qualifications. Perhaps the most famous argument from this chapter is that White's trade his of d-pawn for Black's c-pawn in the Sicilian is justified only by White banking on Black falling for a cheap trick. If that goal is unsuccessful or unrealistic, the pawn trade is strategically unsound. This is just one of the many provocative gems in this brilliant essay, so many of which have informed my opinions for lo these many years.
Gardagar
This book is plenty of fun to read. In it, seven very strong chess players discuss the question of how to open a chess game.

We start with Larry Evans, who tells us (hopefully reminds us) of the basic principles of opening play, namely dominate the center, develop all your pieces fast, castle early, don't sacrifice any material unless you see how to get it back or force checkmate, don't move the same piece twice, make only enough pawn moves to free your pieces, develop Knights before Bishops, don't indulge in early adventures with your Queen, avoid giving useless checks, and do not play for traps unless desperate.

Next, Svetozar Gligoric expands on these principles, with some fine examples from games played by leading grandmasters (including himself).

Well, that alone will get you to play openings reasonably. But there are some simple traps that you'll fall into unless you learn how to avoid them. The next chapter is by Vlastimil Hort, and it is superb. We see some terrific examples of how to play in the opening, and some more sophisticated principles. One game that I particularly liked was 1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 dxe4 4 Nxe4 Nf6 5 Qd3 e5 6 dxe5 Qa5+ 7 Bd2 Qxe5 8 0-0-0 Nxe4 (Oops! This gets mated at once. 8...Be7 would have kept Black in the game.) 9 Qd8+ Black Resigns.

Hort continues with a 9-page introduction to the Trompowsky Opening. At the time, this was a brand new try for White, and I remember reading all about it quite eagerly. It still is worth reading today.

In the following chapter, Lajos Portisch gives some advice on developing an opening repertoire, and he has a bunch of suggestions, with some interesting lines. For White, the Ruy Lopez Exchange Variation. For Black, he then shows the Modern Steinitz defence to the Ruy, as well as an interesting variation of the French, with an early Queen deployment to a5 and a4.

Portisch recommends 1 e4 c5 2 Nc3 Nc6 3 g3 for White. And he has some suggestions for White in the Caro-Kann and the Pirc. Plus, there's material on how to play the King's Indian Attack for White, the King's Indian Defence for Black, the Symmetrical English for White, and the Exchange Variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined for White. And he concludes with eight pages on how to play the Nimzo-Indian for White.

Former World Champion Tigran Petrosian has a fine chapter on how to study and learn opening theory. He gives some spectacular examples of how simply copying recommended moves can lead to disaster. And he shows how to carefully examine lines for possible improvements.

Bent Larsen, in an unforgettable chapter, has more advice on the same topic. We see some games where he opened 1 e4 c5 2 f4. And there's a great example of how not to play the Gruenfeld for Black, to demonstrate that one needs to know quite a few variations fairly well to be ready to play an opening line.

The final chapter, by Paul Keres, shows how he prepared some lines at home for use in tournaments. It's fascinating. We see the Keres variation of the Chigorin, with 11...Nd7 (a line Nigel Davies recommends for Black in his 1 e4 e5 repertoire book, written in 2005!). And we see ideas for Black in the Siesta Variation of the Ruy as well. Plus a few other tidbits.

This book needs to be reprinted. I highly recommend it.