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eBook Semi-Slav download

by Matthew Sadler

eBook Semi-Slav download ISBN: 1901259080
Author: Matthew Sadler
Publisher: Everyman Chess; 1st edition (January 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1842 kb
Fb2: 1398 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit docx azw txt
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Puzzles and Games

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. lt;font face Tms Rmn The Slav Defence (1 d4 d5 2 c4 c6) has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since its adoption by World Champions Alekhine and Euwe in the 1930s.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Nowadays it is very popular both at grandmaster level (it is used regularly by Ivanchuk.

This article is about the British chess player. For the English footballer, see Mat Sadler. Sadler, Matthew (1999). lt;font face Tms Rmn The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's.

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The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's

The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's. Now, it is fashionable both at grandmaster level and with club and tournament players. Here, Grandmaster Matthew Sadler explains the strategy and tactics of this dynamic opening. Through the use of model games for both sides, the author provides a thorough grounding in the key ideas.

Place of Publication. This book completes a trilogy of Queen s Gambit books by grandmaster Sadler which includes The Slav and the Semi-Slav, both of which are published by Everyman Chess. Country of Publication. Hobbies, Pastimes & Indoor Games. Chess Press Opening Guides. Leisure & Lifestyle.

The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's.

Here, Grandmaster Matthew Sadler explains the strategy and tactics of this dynamic opening. Through the use of model games for both sides, the author provides a thorough grounding The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's.

Matthew Sadler - Tips for young players. Matthew Sadler - The Slav. Читать pdf.

Чтение онлайн книги Matthew Sadler. Matthew Sadler - Queen's Gambit Declined. Matthew Sadler - Semi-Slav. Читать бесплатно Купить в издательстве.

The Semi-Slav defence has been one of Black's most reliable defences to the queen's pawn since the 1920's. Now, it is fashionable both at grandmaster level and with club and tournament players. Here, Grandmaster Matthew Sadler explains the strategy and tactics of this dynamic opening. Through the use of model games for both sides, the author provides a thorough grounding in the key ideas.
Comments: (7)
greed style
Another excellent book by Matthew Sadler. As mentioned in a number of other reviews, Mr. Sadler has a talent for explaining the theory behind an opening while providing an excellent analysis of current practice. However, the small size of the book means that this depth comes at a price - less popular moves are not adequately explored.

Also, Mr. Sadler makes a number of assumptions in getting to the starting position of the book that reduce it's usefulness to a player of the Semi-Slav - it really should be titled 'Semi-Slav with an early Nf6 (and assuming White doesn't first exchange pawns on d5)'.

Thus, while the book covers the Botvinnik variation and the Meran variation it does not cover the Slav exchange, (1.d4 d5, 2.c4 c6, 3.cd, cd), the Queens Gambit Declined exchange (1.d4 d5, 2.c4 e6, 3.cd, cd), the Marshall Gambit (1.d4 d5, 2.c4 c6, 3.Nc3 e6, 4.e4) or the Abrahams-Noteboom Variation (1.d4 d5, 2.c4 c6, 3.Nc3 e6, 4.Nf3 dc)
Malak
Having studied the two other books of M.Sadler, just a fast look in this one and seeing the same structure convinced me that it is of the same quality than the others. I mean great learning quality.
Kizshura
Matthew Sadler has put together a real masterpiece here. The book is like no other opening book I have seen (except other books by the same author).
If you want to skip to the most important reason why this is as an excellent book, skip the next three paragraphs.
There are several types of opening books out there. Some are "repetoire" books attempting to put forth a single, unified approach, or maybe two separate unified approaches, for the benefit of those without a lot of time on their hands. Others are little more than compilations of lines with sparse commentary and tons of games. These can be helpful as a reference, but are not as helpful in terms of actually learning an opening.
Still other opening books concentrate on explanation and stand motifs, with a few games for example purposes. These are better for learning, but are still not in the same league as _The Semi-Slav_ by Sadler.
The thing that separates this book is as much the _type_ of commentary as the format, but more on that later. The format is excellent: the book is broken into two main sections: the Bot. and Moscow systems. Then several lines are each analyzed, using sample games with excellent commentary.
Now, I get to my major point: the type of comments, especially in the very first chapter of each main section is extraordinarily insightful. The Semi-Slav can be pretty sharp, so many moves are forced, but Sadler does an A1 job of explaining what is going on. Not simply tactically, but on a more heurestic setting.
His commentary is invaluable because it highlights the key issues of the formation, so you know the reasons why what you should do is good. It goes one step further and often uses the _present_ situation on the board to give reasons why certain moves are good, rather than simply saying "Do this because in the future it will help achieve a this common theme."
One example of this simple yet elegant commentary is about 13 moves down in the Botvinnik variation where the placement of the light bishop and the queen are discussed. The key point is that White's KN has been traded, so it is natural to attack the g2 (which would normally be shielded by this knight) square and those central squares for which the KN and the misplaced QB are natural defenders.
I assert that it would not be overstating things to say the first chapter of each of the two sections of this book will be more helpful by themselves than the majority of opening manuals.
Zeleence
Matthew Sadler does an excellent job of covering the material he covers in his books, and this one is no different. He does a lot of his explaining in a sort of "Question and Answer", or "Frequently Asked Questions" format, which appears to be unique to him (I have yet to see another author use this format). There is a massive amount of material that is squeezed into this 160-page book, including 128 annotated games.
The one downfall to this book is that it leaves out a few of the most critical lines in all of the Semi-Slav. An example here would be the 18...d4 line in the Main Line of the Botvinnik Variation with 17...a3. This is a line that was seen in 1994 (about 4 years before the writing of the book). It is an interesting and sharp line that leads to a Rook Sacrifice on move 22 (22...Rh5, which is the ONLY MOVE), the sacrifice of yet another rook, and eventually a position considered roughly equal after going through a sequence of moves where White is up 2 rooks, but Black has pawns on b4, b2, and c3.
Another loop-hole is the lacking of Black's options other than 6...Bd6 in the 6.Qc2 lines of the 5.e3 Semi-Slav. An important alternative for Black would be 6...b6, for example.
If there was such a rating as "4 and a half stars", that's what I'd give this book, but I had to round it off to 5. 4 would be a bit too harsh. However, while I would highly recommend reading this book, I would also recommend "The Botvinnik Semi-Slav" and "The Meran System", both by Steffen Pederson, as these appear to be more complete in coverage, though also deeper into the theory, and hence I would recommend reading Sadler's book first before trying dive into the others.
A MUST READ for "First-Time" Semi-Slav Players!!!
Jia
I think these Sadler books are good but a bit overrated. None of the three are complete: all of them have significant omissions in terms of the scope of coverage. And the "question and answer" format is a great idea, but it doesn't really work very well. Too often, the questions aren't even questions, but just exclamations such as "Oh Dear!" by an imaginary befuddled reader. His answers have a slick smoothness that sometimes do not really answer the questions. One gets the feeling that these books were turned out quickly. They're not really for beginners, but they are not thorough enough to be stand alone treatises on their respective openings. In the end, they succeed mostly as annotated games collections.