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eBook The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces: Studies in Visual Culture) download

by Jonathan Beller

eBook The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces: Studies in Visual Culture) download ISBN: 1584655836
Author: Jonathan Beller
Publisher: Dartmouth College Press (December 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1579 kb
Fb2: 1522 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: azw mbr lit docx
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Movies

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The Cinematic Mode of Pr. The engaging epilogue is attractive and I find myself returning to passages and ideas from the book.

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Items related to The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy. Jonathan Beller The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces: Studies in Visual Culture). ISBN 13: 9781584655831.

Published December 1, 2006 by Dartmouth College Press. Internet Archive Wishlist.

of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle Beller develops his argument by highlighting various innovations and film texts of the past century.

The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle. This process, he says, underpins the current global economy. Beller develops his argument by highlighting various innovations and film texts of the past century.

October 62:3– 41 Callon M. 1986. Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen

The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle. Lebanon, NH: Dartmouth Univ. Press Benjamin W. 1999. October 62:3– 41 Callon M. Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen. In Power, Action and Belief: A New Sociology of Knowledge, ed. J Law, pp. 67–83. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Callon M, ed. 1998. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell Campregher C. 2010. Shifting perspectives on development: an actor-network study of a dam in Costa Rica. Q. 83(4):783–804 Carse A. 2012.

Jonathan Beller Abstract Cinema marks a profound shift in the relation between .

The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces, Studies in.Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972: A Cross-Reference Book of Information on Some Esthetic Boundaries.

The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces, Studies in Visual Culture). Pedagogy without education. Never Alone, Except for Now: Networked Life between Populations and Publics. Painting, or nothing. Having Been Said: Writings & Interviews of Lawrence Weiner.

Beller, . The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces . Lessing, . Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity. New York: Penguin, 2004Google Scholar

Beller, . The Cinematic Mode of Production: Attention Economy and the Society of the Spectacle (Interfaces: Studies in Visual Culture). New York: Dartmouth College, 2006Google Scholar. New York: Penguin, 2004Google Scholar. Ludovico, . in collaboration with UBERMORGEN. COM and Cirio, . Project Google Will Eat Itself.

Jonathan Beller is a film theorist, culture critic and mediologist. He currently holds the position of Professor of Humanities and Media Studies and Critical and Visual Studies, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY. He is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including Mellon, . Getty and Fulbright Foundation grants and honours.

“Cinema brings the industrial revolution to the eye,” writes Jonathan Beller, “and engages spectators in increasingly dematerialized processes of social production.” In his groundbreaking critical study, cinema is the paradigmatic example of how the act of looking has been construed by capital as “productive labor.” Through an examination of cinema over the course of the twentieth century, Beller establishes on both theoretical and historical grounds the process of the emergent capitalization of perception. This process, he says, underpins the current global economy.By exploring a set of films made since the late 1920s, Beller argues that, through cinema, capital first posits and then presupposes looking as a value-productive activity. He argues that cinema, as the first crystallization of a new order of media, is itself an abstraction of assembly-line processes, and that the contemporary image is a politico-economic interface between the body and capitalized social machinery. Where factory workers first performed sequenced physical operations on moving objects in order to produce a commodity, in the cinema, spectators perform sequenced visual operations on moving montage fragments to produce an image. Beller develops his argument by highlighting various innovations and film texts of the past century. These innovations include concepts and practices from the revolutionary Soviet cinema, behaviorism, Taylorism, psychoanalysis, and contemporary Hollywood film. He thus develops an analysis of what amounts to the global industrialization of perception that today informs not only the specific social functions of new media, but also sustains a violent and hierarchical global society.