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eBook Kubrick's Prophecy, A Guide to the Insights of 2001: A Space Odyssey download

by Galen Bullard

eBook Kubrick's Prophecy, A Guide to the Insights of 2001: A Space Odyssey download ISBN: 0968768709
Author: Galen Bullard
Publisher: Starling Wavefront Ltd. (September 2003)
Pages: 180
ePub: 1532 kb
Fb2: 1142 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf doc lit azw
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Movies

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Kubrick's Prophecy, 2001 book. Director Stanley Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece, cowritten by Arthur.

With 2001 Kubrick became a prophet for 1960s youth culture, though a rather wary and skeptical one. Nathan Abrams’s book explains the wariness by casting Kubrick as a Jewish intellectual. Yes, it’s true that his movies nearly always avoid any mention of Jewishness, but so do Kafka’s novels and stories (which Kubrick loved to read). Abrams remarks that Kubrick had a fondness for ideological speculation, he was Jewish by birth, and he strived self-consciously to be brilliant, all common traits of the New York Intellectuals

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Kubrick's 2001 redefined the science fiction genre, transforming its limits, broadening the scope of what it. .

Kubrick's 2001 redefined the science fiction genre, transforming its limits, broadening the scope of what it can do. It is one of the rare examples of a film which aims to make us think not ABOUT images, but IN images and sounds. This book of newer essays on Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey' is a must-have for film students - whether grad or under-grad - as well as for Kubrick fans or really anyone who rates this film in their Top 20. The question in 1968 was: how can this film be more than just a fad, Kubrick pandering to the hippie generation?

2001: A Space Odyssey is the 1968 science fiction novel written by Arthur C. Clarke and the 1968 film directed by Stanley Kubrick. It is a part of Clarke's Space Odyssey series.

2001: A Space Odyssey is the 1968 science fiction novel written by Arthur C. Both the novel and the film are partially based on Clarke's 1948 short story "The Sentinel", an entry in a BBC short story competition, and "Encounter in the Dawn", published in 1953 in the magazine Amazing Stories.

After Kubrick saw his dinner guests to the door at the end of the evening .

After Kubrick saw his dinner guests to the door at the end of the evening, he rang Clarke an hour later, instructing the writer to "Get rid of. Make any excuse, take him anywhere you like. I don't want to see him again. And that's just one of the fascinating insights I got from reading Benson's vivid, authoritative tome, which is packed with n anecdotes that make for a narrative as gripping and exciting as a novel. However, opinions soon changed and 2001: A Space Odyssey eventually came to be considered one of the greatest science fiction movies of all time. The movie is now believed by many to be Kubrick's magnum opus.

Having seen the film 2001: A Space Odyssey many years ago and being blown away by how powerful it was . I enjoy stories involving space travel and a lot of times the era something is written can occasionally take you out of the story by laughable concepts or dated science

Having seen the film 2001: A Space Odyssey many years ago and being blown away by how powerful it was, and also a bit scared by it. I loved the way it told a story without necessarily explaining everything, and really allowing one's own imagination to fill in some of the gaps. I enjoy stories involving space travel and a lot of times the era something is written can occasionally take you out of the story by laughable concepts or dated science. The feeling I got from this reading was that it explained things in a way that don't date the technology being discussed in any way that ruins the overall story.

2001: A Space Odyssey - Explained. Though, Kubrick makes a bold point the master of Earth is just a child in space. This is done by showing that without gravity, man must learn how to walk again; man must eat baby food ; and need toilet training. Confused after watching it? This may help. At the same time, man’s tools are taking a human-like form. This can be seen by looking at some of the spaceships as they resemble a human face, and later in the film we will learn about HAL - a human in a machine (Kubrick2001). Now, humanity is far more advanced than at the start of the film.

Director Stanley Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece, cowritten by Arthur C. Clarke, engages us in a mythological, symbolic vision of human destiny. Even the title year is not to be taken literally. Like a prophet's riddle, this enigmatic movie challenges our perceptions... and our preconceptions.

Kubrick's Prophecy will guide you to: * perceive important details and symbols in 2001's world * read Kubrick's mythological and cinematic language * discover repeating patterns that unlock the film's meaning * experience 2001's insights into humankind's growing crisis and the path to reaching our evolutionary potential.

Comments: (2)
Whiteflame
One of the best works of film criticism I have ever read. Not only does the author fully explicate the film, but he also, and more importantly, guides the viewer in discovering the significance of the film for the viewer's own life and, by extension, for that of all humanity.

Wanda Avila
Rarranere
"Kubrick's prophesy: A Guide to the Insights of 2001: A Space Odyssey"
Like most people of my generation, I saw 2001: A Space Odyssey in my early teens, and not surprisingly, entirely missed the point of Kubrick's film. It is quite probable that if I had not read Mr. Bullard's book I might still be ignorant of the creative genius behind this masterpiece, and Kubrick's brilliant insights into the development of consciousness within our species.
Galen Bullard does his own masterful job of peeling back the layers of meaning in this movie to reveal the profound symbolism woven into the surface level plot of the story. Everything in this movie, from the enigmatic monolith encountered by the protohumans to the error in the chess game between HAL, the supercomputer, and Frank, the Jupiter mission astronaut, is hugely significant to the overall message of the film. And Galen goes to great lengths to point out these details and explain their place in the big picture (no pun intended).
The book not only discusses Kubrick's insightful perspective on consciousness and human development, it also does a thorough scene by scene analysis of the film; an equally detailed analysis of the symbolism Kubrick used and it's historical significance; a discussion of the "fractal" nature, or "nested structure", of the film's many dimensions; and a meaningful presentation of the film's potential for facilitating our own expansion of consciousness. As Mr. Bullard points out, "The movie itself stands as a monolith: an enigmatic device capable of expanding the consciousness of those who behold it." (pg.108).
Having read Galen's book, and having viewed the film again - this time with my eyes wide open - I feel like I have witnessed something truly extraordinary. Kubrick's supposition that consciousness expands as it encounters the unknown - the "alien" - is entirely in keeping with the cross-cultural perennial philosophy of our species: There is More, and we grow as we experience It, whatever It may be.
- Morgan Syvertsen, Director, Wild Honey Counseling Centre