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by Cynthia Heimel

eBook If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet download ISBN: 0871134446
Author: Cynthia Heimel
Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Pr; 1st edition (April 1, 1991)
Language: English
Pages: 221
ePub: 1313 kb
Fb2: 1329 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc azw txt mobi
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Humor

I absolutely adore Cynthia Heimel and I don't understand why more people don't know her books! .

I absolutely adore Cynthia Heimel and I don't understand why more people don't know her books! She's hilarious, clever, honest- a one off. Read this one and then read all the rest. This is also the first book by Heimel that I've read, so I feel like I didn't quite get where she was coming from when I first picked this book up. The book really hit its stride when it came to the section on women, men, and women and men. The essay Organized into essays on the times (late 80s), women, men, women and men, and the author's life, this book got off to a slow start for me.

Heimel has been described by the "Chicago Tribune" as "perhaps our funniest war correspondent on the war between . Her new book shows Heimel at her wicked best

Heimel has been described by the "Chicago Tribune" as "perhaps our funniest war correspondent on the war between the sexes. Her new book shows Heimel at her wicked best. Like a hip Erma Bombeck or a Dorothy Parker for today, she is an antidote to an absurd world for smart, sane women. 4 people like this topic.

Cynthia Heimel has been described by the Chicago Tribune as perhaps our funniest war correspondent on the war . Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Cynthia Heimel has been described by the Chicago Tribune as perhaps our funniest war correspondent on the war between the sexes ; her wisdom on dating includes such gems as: My new rule is to never believe a person is interested until you feel his tongue down your throat.

From the author of Sex Tips for Girls, a national bestseller that look at women's lives today. If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too? Cynthia Heimel. ISBN13:9780060974787. Advanced Sex Tips for Girls: This Time It's Personal. Recently Viewed and Featured.

Village Voice & Lady'' Heimel (Sex Tips for Girls, 1983) splices together short, fast takes on love, lovelessness . Heimel is also afraid of & New Coldness,'' the passionless careerism of the twentysomething generation

Village Voice & Lady'' Heimel (Sex Tips for Girls, 1983) splices together short, fast takes on love, lovelessness, and life in big, bad New York City. In the most interesting of the 45 pieces reprinted here from the Voice, Playboy, and Vogue, Heimel lets it slip that . Heimel is also afraid of & New Coldness,'' the passionless careerism of the twentysomething generation. She is sick of co-dependency and sick of men who ask women out on dates only to go home with someone else.

Quotes Authors C Cynthia Heimel If you can't live without m. Prev Cynthia Heimel Quotes Next →. .If you can't live without me, why aren't you dead already? Cynthia Heimel. Cynthia Heimel (2002). If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet?!, Grove Press.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Like a hip Erma Bombeck or a Dorothy Parker for today, she is an antidote to an absurd world for smart, sane women

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. Try another ZIP code. Cynthia Heimel has been described by the Chicago Tribune as "perhaps our funniest war correspondent on the war between the sexes"; her wisdom on dating includes such gems as: "My new rule is to never believe a person is interested until you feel his tongue down your throat. If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet?! shows Heimel at her wicked best.

Cynthia Heimel (2002). If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet?!, . 61, Grove Press. Cynthia Heimel (2004). Get Your Tongue Out of My Mouth, I'm Kissing You Good-bye. Pain, Dark, Betrayal. 20. Never judge someone by who he's in love with; judge him by his friends. People fall in love with the most appalling people. Cynthia Heimel (1988). Tired, Our World, Cynical.

Essays offer a satiric look at fashion, television, celebrities, friendship, baseball, names, men, self-help books, fantasies, infidelity, and the sixties
Comments: (7)
santa
Oh my stars,I've owned this book since it was first published.When I feel just a bit blue or put out with life,I pick it up and read a chapter.Cynthias' books were published before the awful Be a Bitch self help genre and it shows.She wants us to get together without having to play silly games.She actually treats men and women equally in her essays but she's got a bit of an axe to grind concerning men and how they sometimes act.In an essay called "She wants money?'she describes "professional girls" and amateur girls' .The pros go to the beauty parlor every week,they were the 4' heels,they have that perfect pearlized eye shadow,while the amateur may have a run in her stocking,got to busy to get to the spa or stylist last week,and the mascara is smudged.The amateur girl is a perfectly lovely women who will be with you no matter how much money you have.But the men don't notice her because they are all circled around the pro with not a hair out of place.Guess what guys, that beauty parlor costs alot of money and she wants payback on her investment.As an amateur girl myself who sometimes never got noticed,I say 3 cheers to Cynthia Heimel.!
Opimath
This hilarious book hides some hard hitting truths about our relationships, insecurities, doubts & regrets, and helped me get through a nasty breakup without going back. Every time I felt tempted to call him, I'd read a chapter & be laughing too hard at seeing the ridiculous nature of my relationships boldly outlined with laugh-at-myself-and-heal humor. After a breakup is when I feel the most depressed, taking life way too seriously! This book had me laughing the whole way, or smirking, chuckling, snorting, almost-peed-myself, non-stop, nodding-my-head, giggling. Whenever I'd get upset about a man, I'd read a few pages & it was like seeing the guy naked to the core--and myself too (because we're not so innocent either)! I now have the whole set of books this author has written, the humor is timeless & there will always be breakups or jerks who make my hair stand on end, and this book helps release the pressure of taking life too darn seriously.
GWEZJ
I didn't know about this author until I read she had died recently. Where have I been? I'm 69, been with more men that I care to admit and split a gut reading this book because it's so spot on. I'll be getting more of her work.
Xtani
great copy, prrgfect hardcover jacket.
Inertedub
...kept it because the book did too! Fun, easy, thought provoking, good to have stashed in the purse for a train ride or a nice afternoon read.
AGAD
Captures the times and the people very well with some really funny insights. Apparently, many of her generation actually were high at the time.
Kamick
Cynthia Heimel's "If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet?" is a collection of her columns from the Village Voice, Playboy, and Cosmo. The book is half painful wisdom, half male-oriented feminist anger, and half fall-on-the-floor-laugh-out-loud comedy. If you think that doesn't add up right, you haven't taken into account that anger can be funny, and sometimes even wise. The columns date from the 1980's and are totally New York oriented, so if you don't think the Big Apple is the center of the universe you may find yourself annoyed, and the discussion of drug use will profoundly disturb some. But Heimel's not out to offend--she's just an urban divorced mother trying to live a worthwhile life. She's caught in the crossfire of mindless masculinity and rabid feminism, looking for a safe place for a love life, a job, and a family. Her most moving columns are about her son, and "Childhood is Powerful" should be required reading for prospective parents. In it, she talks about guilt, and how honesty with your child is more important than parental authority; and how limits must not be placed on your child in order to create that authority. "As much as love, empathy cures all evils." And "For Rent: Empty Nest" is a tear-and-smile inducing bit of writing that will resonate with every mother. "If You Can't Live Without Me, Why Aren't You Dead Yet?" isn't a perfect book, but it's bite-sized slices of life are well worth the price of admission, especially if your date is paying!
I really wanted to like this book. With a great title like that, I expected it to be a comic look at the relations between men and women, likely coming hard down on the side of women. Instead, it is a mismash of New York angst mixed with the fading regret of yet another runaway from the 60s. In short, choppy doses (each section was originally published as individual essays in Playboy, Cosmopolitan, or The Village Voice), Heimel raves against the world, but not of it ever is funny enough to make you laugh out loud or close enough for that frission of understanding to occur. Oh, you might be able to identify with her if you are a single mother of a teenage son who supports herself by writing in Manhattan, but I wouldn't take bets on it.
The essays are grouped into sections labled "The Times," "Women," "Men," "Women and Men," and "The Writer's Life." The best stuff is in "The Times" such as "Notes on Black" about how all the trendy people who were the originators of the black look are conspiring to forgo it for another color until all the sheep quit wearing it, then they'll go back. The worst stuff is in "The Writer's Life," which should instead have been entitled "Cynthia Heimel's Life" because I saw nothing there that resembled any other writer I know.
I guess I looked in the wrong place. I had noticed that I had a lot of comic stuff by men on my shelf, but nothing by a woman, so I browsed the shelves and came up with this. I'm not necessarily a fan of the comic essay (Dave Barry probably being the prime example of it today, and whom I can read but I never feel like purchasing a whole volume of his stuff). In essays, I tend to like humorous political commentary (say Molly Ivins or P.J. O'Rourke) better than Andy Rooney style essays on the little things of life. Instead I should have picked up comic fiction by a woman, I guess--except I'm not aware of any. Zora Neale Huston? Anyway, with due apologies to Heimel, I can live without her.