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eBook Punchlines: The Violence of American Humor download

by William Keough

eBook Punchlines: The Violence of American Humor download ISBN: 1557780846
Author: William Keough
Publisher: Paragon House; 1st edition (June 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 278
ePub: 1504 kb
Fb2: 1976 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt lrf lrf lit
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Humor

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William Keough, a professor of English at Fitchburg State College in Massachusetts, argues that violence, and also sexism, racism and brutality, are essential to American humor

William Keough, a professor of English at Fitchburg State College in Massachusetts, argues that violence, and also sexism, racism and brutality, are essential to American humor. It was Columbus," Keough writes, "who made perhaps the first truly American joke (the first white American joke at least) when he dubbed the natives of these isles 'Indians' and called his find 'the West Indies.

American humor refers collectively to the conventions and common threads that tie together humor in the United States. It is often defined in comparison to the humor of another country – for example, how it is different from British humor and Canadian humor. It is, however, difficult to say what makes a particular type or subject of humor particularly American. Humor usually concerns aspects of American culture, and depends on the historical and current development of the country's culture.

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My generalization is happily or unhappily confirmed in a book called Punchlines (Paragon House, 1990) by William Keough of the English Department of Fitchburg . The subtitle is The Violence of American Humor.

My generalization is happily or unhappily confirmed in a book called Punchlines (Paragon House, 1990) by William Keough of the English Department of Fitchburg State College in Massachusetts. Mr. Keough, by means of essays on Mark Twain, Ring Lardner, Ambrose Bierce, myself, comedians in the movies (both silents and talkies), and radio and TV and nightclub comics right up to the present, persuades me that the most memorable jokes by Americans are responses to the economic and physical violence of this society.

All Joking Aside: American Humor and Its Discontents by Rebecca . his book will be good source for looking at an important aspect of humor. He has delivered his punchlines well and made out an excellent case for racial, ethnic and gender humor.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). In defending politically incorrect humor, Rappoport draws on the extensive writing of sociologist Christie Davies, folklorist Alan Dundes, and others but supplies additional observations and conclusions. He presents the sword and shield metaphor clearly: humor is a sword that targets stereotypes and a shield that deflects from them.

British humor is also known to be characterized by a level of subtlety, which often veils sarcasm or even strong emotions. Americans are known for being upfront, and this is made obvious in how they like their comedy shows: straight forward and direct to the point.

American humor refers collectively to the conventions and common threads that tie togetherhumorin the United States. It is often defined in comparison to the humor of another country - for example, how it is different fromBritish humorandCanadian humor. Humor usually concerns aspects of Americanculture, and depends on the historical and current development of the country's culture.

38 William Keough, Punchlines: The Violence of American Humor (New York: Paragon House, 1990), 12.

38 William Keough, Punchlines: The Violence of American Humor (New York: Paragon House, 1990), 121. 39 Doonesbury: Drawing and Quartering for Fun and Profit, Time, 107, 6 (February 1975), 57–66, 57. 40 Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail, ’72 (San Francisco: Straight Arrow Books, 1973); Hunter S. Thompson, He Was a Crook, Rolling Stone, 684 (16 June 1994), reprinted in The Atlantic Online, ww. heatlantic. 41 Robert Coover, The Public Burning (New York: Grove Press, 1977).

Examines the role violence has recently played in American humor and offers possible reasons for this evolution