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eBook Steaming to Bamboola: The World of a Tramp Freighter download

by Christopher Buckley

eBook Steaming to Bamboola: The World of a Tramp Freighter download ISBN: 0140099220
Author: Christopher Buckley
Publisher: Penguin Books; 1st edition (February 3, 1987)
Language: English
Pages: 222
ePub: 1523 kb
Fb2: 1774 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc rtf lit mobi
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Humor

Buckley, Christopher, 1952-. It appears that this text book is improperly labeled as Steaming to Bamboola, when it is actually not that book.

Buckley, Christopher, 1952-. Columbianna (Steamship), Seafaring life. New York : Congdon & Lattès : Distributed by St. Martin's Press. ENCRYPTED DAISY download. For print-disabled users.

At just over 200 pages, Steaming to Bamboola is a quick read with fun insight into the world of the Merchant Marine and the long gone tramp steamer.

He shipped out in 1970 at the age of 18 as a deck boy aboard a Norwegian tramp steamer and ended up circling the globe. At just over 200 pages, Steaming to Bamboola is a quick read with fun insight into the world of the Merchant Marine and the long gone tramp steamer. Christopher Buckley, son of William F. Buckley J. is a good writer and does a terrific job with this, his first book.

In his author’s note to Steaming to Bamboola, Christopher T. Buckley (1948- ), son of William F. Buckley Jr. .The names of the ship and her crew were changed. writes, The ship, the people, and the events are real. Buckley’s book reveals his vision of America’s seafarers during the Vietnam War, misfits of the late 1970s and early 1980s who go to sea to escape problems on land. He shows us the alcohol, drugs, sex, and violence of their lives as they work aboard the fictional tramp steamer Columbianna in America’s Fourth Arm of Defense during those turbulent years.

One of my ships was a tramp freighter working the east coast of South Americe. Christopher Buckley wrote a great book here. Too bad he didn't stick with this sort of writing. Had to make a lving I guess

book by Christopher Buckley. One of my ships was a tramp freighter working the east coast of South Americe. This copy replaced one I "loaned" out and never got back. It's a fun read, and for me, even better because I recognized so many of the details as accurate. Had to make a lving I guess. This book is about the average Joe (sailors on a tramp steamer) and what he has to do to make a living.

Steaming to Bamboola: The World of. a Tramp Freighter. Several hundred people in their twenties stormed the gates of a retirement community in the early hours this morning. Residents were assaulted as they played golf. When you are old and gray and full of sleep, And nodding by the fire, take down this book. Blessed are the young, for they shall inherit the national debt. Demonstrators seized carts and drove them into water hazards and bunkers.

Old Tramp Steamer - Продолжительность: 5:15 The Mollys - Topic Recommended for yo.

Old Tramp Steamer - Продолжительность: 5:15 The Mollys - Topic Recommended for you. 5:15. Documentary: 100 Years Of British Ships - Продолжительность: 56:59 swiftcirrus Recommended for you. 56:59. A walk about inside the passenger area on a working freighter ship - Продолжительность: 9:36 Merv Colton Recommended for you. 9:36. Thames River, 1920's.

Fifteen days on a battered tramp steamer en route from Charleston, So. Carolina, to Bremerhaven and back . Carolina, to Bremerhaven and back to New Orleans-via pungent but skimpy sketches of the captain, chief engineer, cook, radio operator, and others of the luckless, half-crazed crew. Where, on this itinerary, is Bamboola? Well, it's a dangerous but nowhere port more or less misnamed after Bermuda; in the world of the Columbianna, it could be any of hundreds of ports

Bibliographic Details. Title: Steaming to Bamboola: The World of A Tramp. List this Seller's Books.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Congdon and Lattes, In. New York, New York, . Publication Date: 1982. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

But in fact, Steaming to Bamboola: The World of a Tramp Freighter. That was 15 books ago now; there’s something about your firstborn. What book have you always meant to read and haven’t gotten around to?

But in fact, Steaming to Bamboola: The World of a Tramp Freighter. What book have you always meant to read and haven’t gotten around to? Anything you feel embarrassed never to have read? War and Peace. My standard excuse for this appalling illiteracy is: I’m saving it for my final illness. But when the doctors tell me I have six months to live, I wonder: Will I really reach for War and Peace instead of P. G. Wodehouse?

The author recounts his journey on a tramp steamer across the Atlantic and the colorful members of the crew he worked with
Comments: (7)
Sirara
Steaming to Bamboola is Christopher Buckley's first book, an entertaining account of his time spent as a Merchant Seaman. He shipped out in 1970 at the age of 18 as a deck boy aboard a Norwegian tramp steamer and ended up circling the globe. His pay was $20 a week and he has since remarked, "I've never since worked harder physically or felt richer." The book has been out of print for a while, but richly deserves to be brought back. If you can find it used and are a fan of Christopher Buckley and/or sailing travelogues, be sure to snap it up while you can.

In today's world of container shipping the days of the tramp steamer are all but gone, but they live on in this raucous account of life on the high seas. We meet rebellious deckhands, nosy room stewards, and an ornery bosun from Alabama who openly says he shot a man but did jail time for something else he refuses to reveal. There is the ex-submariner from Kentucky money who can quote Shakespeare, suspect cooks who routinely miss lifeboat drills because of bouts of the DTs, and a captain and chief engineer who have been sailing together for over a decade yet utterly despise each other. If you have ever spent time on a ship you have probably run into colorful characters like these. We endure horrible storms with them and even worse on-board entertainment. We head ashore with them in foreign ports of call, hang out with them in seedy seamen's clubs and barely roll back up the gangplank in time for the next leg of the trip bruised, battered, and barely conscious. Some may call these men misfits while ashore, but at sea they have no equal.

In one especially interesting part of the book we hear amazing stories from the past in Sailor's Snug Harbor, a home for retired mariners in Sea Level, North Carolina. Several residents of Snug Harbor have over 50 years of sea time. It is here that we encounter fascinating accounts of the man who was blown into the smokestack when his ship was torpedoed off the coast of South America in 1942, the story of the captain of the first ship sunk in WWII, and more.

At just over 200 pages, Steaming to Bamboola is a quick read with fun insight into the world of the Merchant Marine and the long gone tramp steamer. Christopher Buckley, son of William F. Buckley Jr., is a good writer and does a terrific job with this, his first book. If you have spent time on ships, are interested in life at sea, or are simply a travel junkie like me, definitely pick this one up if you can find it.

Special note: Steaming to Bamboola is a good companion volume to John McPhee's Looking For A Ship (1990), another enjoyable firsthand account of the life of merchant seamen on tramp steamers.
Anicasalar
I enjoyed reading Steaming to Bamboola. As a 15 year(and counting) Merchant Mariner, I've heard some of these sea stories before. Who knows where they first came from. This book did a good job of explaining the life at sea. Poignant, sad, funny, weird, with moments of great beauty thrown in, plus a healthy respect for the shear power of the sea. A bit on the short side but well worth the money.
Juce
I thought this book was great. Then, again, I was an Able Seaman on a victory freighter in '65 to 67. My next step was to go to Mates school to advance to 3rd mate, or quit the sea and go back to college. It was a tough decision, because I loved the sea. Buckley brought back many memories of my 5 or so trips to Viet Nam and other Asian ports.
- Don (retired forester)
Wilalmaine
Must read for any merchant mariner.
Iaran
A great story of our Merchant Marine. A bit raunchy.
Utchanat
A good collection of sea stories by someone who was obviously there.
Capt. Vernon Adkison
Marine Pilot
Master Mariner, USMM
Alask
Ger
Those accustomed to Christopher Buckley's generally excellent but mostly satirical body of work may have missed this gem. I did until reading an interview with him in which he was asked which was his favorite of the books he had written. He picked this one and it's more than an innate bias for one's first-born. A tale of eccentric characters on a real life tramp freighter voyage when Buckley was a much younger man, It's a fascinating read for a landlubber like me and very well done. Not once does Buckley refer to himself (he does recount his feelings in an essay republished in Wry Martinis). Clearly though, the Yale-educated son of a public figure couldn't have had an easy time fitting in. If you can find this book (look in your local library - sorry Amazon) then read it.
This is a very clever, creative and satisfying read. "Steaming to Bamboola" both demonstrates Buckley's sophisticated intellect and entertains in his characteristically unpretentious and powerfully understated fashion. Following "The White House Mess" this book also reflects the author's development as a writer, and is in keeping with the rapier wit evident in his later "Thank You For Smoking" , "Wry Martinis", and "Little Green Men".
Having first read "Wry Martinis" I quickly recognized that "Steaming to Bamboola" was written from Buckley's first hand experience having worked on a freighter. The book weaves nuggets of nautical science, policy, and history with droll observations on the myriad, misfit personalities drawn to the merchant marine lifestyle. Besides making you laugh, the book is educational and informative as it is written in a style that the total neophyte can understand and appreciate.
"Steaming to Bamboola" would fall into the "a man's book" genre; it is written from a masculine perspective, but could be fully appreciated by both sexes. The book leaves you with an tremendous amount of admiration for Christopher Buckley as a extremely bright, worldly, witty, and tremendously likeable guy.