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eBook Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History download

by Barry Sanders

eBook Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History download ISBN: 0807062057
Author: Barry Sanders
Publisher: Beacon Press; New Ed edition (October 30, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 328
ePub: 1795 kb
Fb2: 1725 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi docx docx lrf
Category: Humour
Subcategory: Humor

Barry Sanders' book Sudden Glory: Laughter as subversive History is a prime example.

Barry Sanders' book Sudden Glory: Laughter as subversive History is a prime example. Its title promises something subversive, more specifically, the treatment of laughter as something subversive. A book to read again very shortly.

Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History (1996) - Explores the history of laughter, emphasizing the ways in which it has been used as a means of political subversion

Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History (1996) - Explores the history of laughter, emphasizing the ways in which it has been used as a means of political subversion. The Private Death of Public Discourse (1998) - thesis is that civil public discourse is possible only if there is the necessary corollary of truly introspective quest for meaning. The Green Zone: The Environmental Costs of US Militarism (2009) - (finalist in the 2011 Oregon Book Award general nonfiction category.

Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History by Barry Sanders (1995-10-06). A is for Ox: A Short History of the Alphabet. 10 people found this helpful.

Barry Sanders, Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History (Beacon Press, 25 Beacon S. This leads Sanders to one of the book's important conclusions: throughout history, laughter has tended to rise from the lower classes, much to the embarrassment. of the upper classes.

Barry Sanders, Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History (Beacon Press, 25 Beacon St., Boston, MA 02108), 328 p. Paper, 1996. Laughter acted as check against the worst excesses of the ruling class; if a. priest or nobleman wasn't careful in his dealings with the local peasantry, the resulting mockery. could render him impotent.

In this wonderful exploration of the meaning of laughter, Barry Sanders queries its uses from the ancient Hebrews to Lenny Bruce, turning up evidence of its age-old power to subvert authority and give voice to the voiceless. Not light reading but well worth the time and effort.

Sudden Glory presents the history of one of the most evanescent but powerful forms of human expression .

Sudden Glory presents the history of one of the most evanescent but powerful forms of human expression - laughter. Here is the first book to look not at humor or comedy, but it laughter itself - and specifically at the way laughter evolved into an effective weapon for political subversion. Barry Sanders asks What did people laugh at? And why? What was the Church's attitude? The Rabbis'? Who could do it, when, and at whom? When did the joke first appear?

Laughter as Subversive History.

Laughter as Subversive History. Category: Nonfiction. In this wonderful exploration of the meaning of laughter, Barry Sanders queries its uses from the ancient Hebrews to Lenny Bruce, turning up evidence of its age-old power to subvert authority and give voice to the voiceless. Inspired by Your Browsing History. Teresita Fernández.

Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive Activity surveys the history of human y, the history of laughter. Most important, Sanders argues the subversive nature of laughter: that in the face of religious or political authority, laughter can become as powerful a force as war and break the stranglehold that civilized behavior often demands of people.

Barry Sanders was professor of History of Ideas and English at Pitzer College in Claremont, California and a prolific author. He is also the author of "Sudden Glory: Laughter as Subversive History". Sanders retired from Pitzer College in 2005 but remains active as an author. In 2005 Sanders won a Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant to investigate the idea of the Commons in Greece.

In this wonderful exploration of the meaning of laughter, Barry Sanders queries its uses from the ancient Hebrews to Lenny Bruce, turning up evidence of its age-old power to subvert authority and give voice to the voiceless.