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eBook Seeing is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties download

by Peter Biskind

eBook Seeing is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties download ISBN: 0747556903
Author: Peter Biskind
Publisher: Bloomsbury Pub Ltd (August 31, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 384
ePub: 1254 kb
Fb2: 1442 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: rtf mobi lrf txt
Category: Humour

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Seeing Is Believing book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Seeing Is Believing: Or How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the '50s as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd and witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love or love to. .I thoroughly enjoyed this book

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd and witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love or love to hate and the thousand subtle ways they reflect the political tensions of the decade. I thoroughly enjoyed this book. In it, Peter Biskind examines a host of films from the fifties (and a few from surrounding years), putting them onto the sociological equivalent of an analyst's couch, so to speak.

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd, witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love-or love to hate-and the thousand subtle ways they reflect the political tensions of the decade.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd, witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love-or love to hate-and the thousand subtle ways they reflect the political tensions of the decade.

Электронная книга "Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties", Peter Biskind. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

II film culture, Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us To Stop Worrying And Love The Fifties. But they also drive u.

Published in September by the nonprofit New Press, the book is a kind of sequel to Biskinds earlier look at post-World War II film culture, Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us To Stop Worrying And Love The Fifties. Finding it wasnt quite as easy as it should have been.And in the present era, figures Biskind, movies like The Dark Knight or The X-Men series and TV programming like Game Of Thrones and The Walking Dead have been pushing us toward the edges. These shows have normalized the extremes so that they have become the new mainstream.

Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood Taught Us to Stop Worrying and Love the Fifties. Peter Biskind on IMDb. Charlie Rose Show: A panel discussion about Hollywood movies of the 1970s and their impact on American culture. New York: Pantheon Books. The Godfather Companion: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About All Three Godfather Films. New York, NY: HarperPerennial. Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the n'-Roll Generation Saved Hollywood.

Like Sayre, Biskind sees On the Waterfront as ""a weapon of the witch hunt""-with allusions to Elia Kazan's HUAC past.

a nightmare of repression"") on display in such studies as Nora Sayre's Running Time (1982). Like Sayre, Biskind sees On the Waterfront as ""a weapon of the witch hunt""-with allusions to Elia Kazan's HUAC past.

Peter Biskind is a cultural critic and film historian. He has published six books: Seeing Is Believing: How Hollywood taught us to stop worrying and love the fifties (1983); The Godfather Companion (1990); Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll generation saved Hollywood (1998); Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the rise of independent film (1998); Gods and.

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd and witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love – or love .

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd and witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love – or love to hate – and the thousand subtle ways they reflect the political tensions of the decade. Peter Biskind concentrates on the films everybody saw but nobody really looked at, classics such as Giant, Rebel Without a Cause, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and shows us how movies that appear politically innocent in fact bear an ideological burden.

Seeing is Believing is a provocative, shrewd and witty look at the Hollywood fifties movies we all love - or love to hate - and the thousand subtle ways they reflect the political tensions of the decade. Peter Biskind concentrates on the films everybody saw but nobody really looked at, classics such as Giant, Rebel Without a Cause, and Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and shows us how movies that appear politically innocent in fact bear an ideological burden. As we see organization men and rugged individualists, housewives, and career women, cops and docs, teen angels and teenage werewolves fight it out across the screen, from suburbia to the farthest reaches of the cosmos, we understand that we have been watching one long dispute about how to be a man, a woman, an American - the conflicts of the time in action.
Comments: (7)
Insanity
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. In it, Peter Biskind examines a host of films from the fifties (and a few from surrounding years), putting them onto the sociological equivalent of an analyst's couch, so to speak. Through the aperture of these movies, all the conflicting social forces that were vying with one another in the U.S. during 1950s can be seen at work: Liberalism versus conservatism, individualism and personal freedom versus community and conformism, expanding opportunities for women versus reactionary antifeminist backlash, and lots more.

For the most part Biskind presents a convincing case that the movies he looks at stake out this or that position on this or that spectrum of conflicting social opinions and trends, but I'm certainly not saying that I agreed with all of his points. A thinking, critical reader is always unlikely to agree with everything they find in an opinion-packed, interpretation-packed book like this one. In particular, I was profoundly unconvinced by Biskind's argument that the 1954 giant-ant movie Them! carried an anti-feminist subtext. But disagreements like this were the exception rather than the rule for me, and in any case I always found his discussions and analyses to be interesting, engaging, and entertaining.

As an example, here's a passage I particularly enjoyed from a section on the James Dean vehicle Rebel Without a Cause (1955): "With its trilogy of sick families, Rebel touches all the bases. Parents are criticized for being too strong and too weak, too authoritarian and too permissive, for being absent when the kids need them and smothering them with affection when they don’t. If it’s bad to treat teen-agers like children, it’s also bad to treat them like adults. In Rebel, parents can’t do anything right."

Quite a bit of the book is devoted to examining gender roles -- how views about these roles were changing during the 50s, and how a range of movies portrayed and commented, either positively or negatively, on this change. The book's evisceration of the savagely anti-feminist Mildred Pierce (1945) was a particular delight for me in the text.

So again, this is a deeply interesting, engaging, and entertaining book!
Ttexav
While but a segment of his book, Biskind's discussion of 1950s SF has become foundational, whether or not scholars agree with his assertions. More often disagreed with, Biskind's analysis of 1950s film history nonetheless serves as far more than a straw man. Seeing is Believing is a significant work and well worth the time of film genre scholars.
Munimand
I am a big fan of Peter Biskind's Easy Riders, Raging Bulls. That book tells a story of the evolution of film in the 60s and the 70s and who contributed to those changes. Unfortunately, Seeing is Believing tells us less about the evolution of film through the 50s and how it evolved and digs much deeper into more academic film criticism. As Biskind writes in the introduction, "my concern is not so much with the intentions of the filmmakers as with the outcome of the filmmaking process." I interpret this phrase to mean that Biskind is writing about what he sees in the movies, not what the filmmaker intended or what others might see.

Biskind goes from genre to genre and applies the films he reviews to specific liberal and conservative ideological positions he has identified. As he does so, the occasional anecdote about a film is mentioned, but only fleetingly. For example, some movies had their endings changed by the studios. I was interested in hearing more about the changed endings, why they were changed, and what directors fought the changes, then Biskind's discussion of how the ending fits into his ideological spectrum.

One thing that really bothered me was that in discussing The Court Martial of Billy Mitchell, Biskind ignored that the movie was based on true events of the 1920s and was not an entirely Hollywood creation. In excluding that information, Biskind betrays the problem of ignoring the filmmakers in telling us what the film means. Of course, Billy Mitchell can still fit into an interesting ideological discussion of the 1950s. Gary Cooper's decision to play him fits into a broader pattern of playing individualists and why the movie was made when it was could have some relevance. But Biskind does not discuss that context and instead focuses on the ideological categories he has conjured up.

If you liked Easy Riders, Raging Bulls and thought you would check out Biskind's other work, I would save this for last or skip it all together. That said, it did give me a neat list of 50s films to add to my list.
Amis
This is a fascinating, deep dive in the cinema of the 1950s. It is a perfect book to read in the era of streaming movies, because Biskind goes much deeper than the the surface and references many films that younger readers are likely to have missed. I would finish a chapter and set the book aside to stream a film (or two) and then resume reading. It made for a long, but worthwhile read. I feel like I know a lot more about pop culture in the middle of the past century than I did.
Silverbrew
The item arrived in a timely manner and as described.
Andriodtargeted
Biskind writes about Hollywood like a great screenwriter - keeping the story flowing and building on the insider excitement - at least he does in Easy Riders to Raging Bulls. and Down and Dirty Pictures. Seeing is believing is more of an intellectual dissection of 50's politics with movies as the lab animal. It's fascinating, but not nearly as fun.