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eBook To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography (Daniel Berrigan Reprint) download

by Daniel Berrigan

eBook To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography (Daniel Berrigan Reprint) download ISBN: 1556354738
Author: Daniel Berrigan
Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (November 1, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 364
ePub: 1345 kb
Fb2: 1478 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: lrf docx lrf rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: World

war on Vietnam; and his ongoing. civil disobedience, which led to his going underground and subsequent two-year imprisonment

This is a bibliography of works by and about Daniel Joseph Berrigan, . May 9, 1921 – April 30, 2016), who was an American Jesuit priest, anti-war activist, poet, essayist, and university instructor.

This is a bibliography of works by and about Daniel Joseph Berrigan, . Berrigan was an award-winning and prolific author, who published more than 50 books during his life in 1957, he was awarded the Lamont Prize for his book of poems, Time Without Number. Note: Daniel Berrigan was the author, or co-author, of more than fifty books. winner of the Lamont Poetry Prize.

Daniel Joseph Berrigan SJ (May 9, 1921 – April 30, 2016) was an American Jesuit priest, anti-war activist, Christian pacifist, playwright, poet, and author. Like many others during the 1960s, Berrigan's active protest against the Vietnam War earned him both scorn and admiration, but it was his participation in the Catonsville Nine that made him famous

To Dwell in Peace book. Berrigan's unswerving commitment to Christ and to peace is most impressive. He suffered greatly, and in many ways, because of that commitment

To Dwell in Peace book. He suffered greatly, and in many ways, because of that commitment. I greatly admire his devotion to Christ and to the cause of peace. In writing about the Christian (Catholic) support for the Vietnam War, he writes, America needed us and got us with a vengea This autobiography by Berrigan was written when he was sixty-six years old. It is very poetical prose, and a joy to read, even though it was also quite slow to read.

Электронная книга "To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography", Daniel Berrigan

Электронная книга "To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography", Daniel Berrigan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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Catholics - United States - Biography. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on June 14, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Daniel J. Berrigan was born in Virginia, Minnesota, a Midwestern . Daniel Berrigan (2007). To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography. Wipf & Stock Publishers. Berrigan was born in Virginia, Minnesota, a Midwestern working-class town, on May 9, 1921. His father, Thomas Berrigan, was a second-generation Irish Catholic and active union member. Thomas left the Catholic Church, but Daniel remained attracted to the Church throughout his youth. Although a life-long devotee of Notre Dame, Berrigan joined the Jesuits directly out of high school in 1939 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1952  .

To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography. William P. George, "To Dwell in Peace: An Autobiography. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Apostle Paul in Arabia. Stephen's Defense before the Sanhedrin. How Old Was Solomon When He Began to Reign?

Philip Berrigan (brother). Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock. ISBN 978-1-55635-473-1.

Philip Berrigan (brother). Daniel Joseph Berrigan SJ (May 9, 1921 – April 30, 2016) was an American Jesuit priest, anti-war activist, and poet. Like many others during the 1960s, Berrigan's active protest against the Vietnam War earned him both scorn and admiration, but it was his participation in the Catonsville Nine that made him famous.

This new edition of Daniel Berrigan's classic autobiography To Dwell in Peace, with a new afterword by the author, takes us through his childhood in Syracuse; his early years as a Jesuit, teacher, priest, and poet; his bold 1968 Catonsville Nine action, when he poured homemade napalm on draft files in opposition to the U.S. war on Vietnam; and his ongoing civil disobedience, which led to his going underground and subsequent two-year imprisonment. We read of friends like Thomas Merton, Dorothy Day, William Stringfellow, and his brother Philip Berrigan, with whom he participated again in the 1980 Plowshares Eight disarmament action. Daniel Berrigan's breathtaking story and the poetic way he tells it inspire and challenge us to resist war, pursue nuclear disarmament, and undertake a similar journey to peace, hope, and justice.
Comments: (7)
Foiuost
I began reading this autobiography a bit perplexed...like reading a personal diary...Father Berrigan shares his spirit in a way that Thomas Merton never did (and I am a huge fan of Fr. Merton)...if you grew up to Catholic maturity in the '50's-'70's, read this and decide if we have come as far as his vision portrays...just a thought...
Unh
Sometimes perplexing , but alays thoughtful by one of the great American activists
Wafi
A robust account of how, with voice of conscience and truth to power, a poet can make front page headlines and have a profound impact on far-flung individuals. It's a transformative demonstration of how to find real toads in poisonous gardens.
Fomand
Fascinating and well written story of development of a radical priest.
Delalbine
Brilliantly written and infinitely inspirational...
Jai ma
GawelleN
Fr. Berrigan writes is a lyrical, almost poetic way. The story pulls one into itself. He writes clearly and succinctly yet there is always a feeling of more. If one is interested in the antiwar movement in the Viet Nam Era or the ongoing nonviolent campaign against nuclear armament, this book tell this man's story without trying to pull heartstrings; yet it shares the joy and the downside of being true to ones moral convictions withut pulling punches.
Ndlaitha
Good
“[Daniel] Berrigan undoubtedly stands among the most influential American Jesuits of the past century, joining the likes of John Courtney Murray and Avery Dulles. Priest, poet, retreat master, teacher, peace activist, friend and mentor, he is the author of more than 50 books on Scripture, spirituality and resistance to war.” (From an obituary appearing in America magazine in April of this year, 2016) The same obituary quotes the Trappist monk Thomas Merton’s Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander (Image Classics), in which Merton described Berrigan as “an altogether winning and warm intelligence and a man who, I think, has more than anyone I have ever met the true wide-ranging and simple heart of the Jesuit: zeal, compassion, understanding, and uninhibited religious freedom. Just seeing him restores one’s hope in the Church.”

Some of what Merton experienced comes through in this book—although the ingrained poet in Berrigan had evolved a prose style that forces us to push through the linguistic thickets and canebrakes. One comes away weary and disappointed, since there is so much of Berrigan that this book leaves unsaid or undersaid.

Catholics, regardless of convictions and predictions, who were of age during the Sixties especially will regret the tantalizingly missed opportunity to discover what made Berrigan tick. He does, however, get across the frustration he had in getting Catholics to seriously reflect on the moral and spiritual dimensions of the Vietnam War. When he spoke to the Catholic laity of the war in scriptural terms, “it turned living ears to stone.” (p. 222) Not to mention the Catholic academic and clerical establishment—“theorists and ideologues and moral theologians. The vast majority of these eminences had backed up wars and armies, for centuries.” (ibid.)

Already anticipating the end(?), the book’s dedication reads simply: “Vita mutator non tollitur.” For those needing to look for the translation from Latin: “Life is changed, not taken away.”