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eBook Familiar Strangers: A History of Muslims in Northwest China (Studies on Ethnic Groups in China) download

by Lipman J

eBook Familiar Strangers: A History of Muslims in Northwest China (Studies on Ethnic Groups in China) download ISBN: 0295976446
Author: Lipman J
Publisher: University of Washington Press (January 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 318
ePub: 1603 kb
Fb2: 1810 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: History
Subcategory: World

Islam in China is sadly a story of being ignored and overlooked even among academics. Yet today there are about 15 million Muslims in China, centered mostly in the northwest (Xinjiang province), along the margins of the old Silk Road

Islam in China is sadly a story of being ignored and overlooked even among academics. Lipman is one of those few scholars today that write about this fascinating form of Islam and their adherents. The approach Lipman takes is one of adaptation and local circumstances on the subject of Chinese Islam. Yet today there are about 15 million Muslims in China, centered mostly in the northwest (Xinjiang province), along the margins of the old Silk Road. And they aren't just an insignificant minority: in the Middle Ages, for instance, Chinese Muslims played a central role in bridging the gulf between China, the Middle East, and Europe, bringing goods and knowledge both ways.

Even among Sino-Muslims there has been great diversity. lished, and China was brought back into the larger Islamic world. Lipman touches on this early history, but his main focus is on the relations between the. Muslims of the northwest and the Qing Dynasty (1644–1912), also known as the Manchus. 165. was during this period that the peoples in the northwest got caught up in a cycle of violence. that led to a series of wars between 1863 and 1873, collectively labeled Muslim rebellions, that devastated the region.

Series: Studies on Ethnic Groups in China. Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of the frontiers of the Mongolian-Manchu, Tibetan, Turkic, and Chinese cultural regions. From the vantage of either Chinese or Islamic studies, Euro-Americans lack even an inteilectual context for a focused treatment of this important cultural encounter and the miilions of indwiduals who have participated in it.

Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of the frontiers of the Mongolian-Manchu, Tibetan, Turkic, and Chinese cultural regions

Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of the frontiers of the Mongolian-Manchu, Tibetan, Turkic, and Chinese cultural regions.

Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of. .More importantly I This was a very refreshing read after Raphael Israeli's Islam in China.

Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of the frontiers of the Mongolian-Manchu, Tibetan, Turkic, and Chinese cultural regions. As I am currently living in Northwest China, I found the history behind the somewhat mysterious internal divisions (religious, political, and social) between the various Muslim groups to be particularly enlightening.

Did Chinese Muslims have a common history across China, or has one been created for them because they are now labeled an ethnic minority group (minzou) in the People's Republic of China? Jonathan Lipman begins his history by challenging the whole notion of the Hui as a.

Did Chinese Muslims have a common history across China, or has one been created for them because they are now labeled an ethnic minority group (minzou) in the People's Republic of China? Jonathan Lipman begins his history by challenging the whole notion of the Hui as an ethnic group, which he argues in his Introduction has been taken as an unproblematic category by both Chinese and Western scholars.

Studies on ethnic groups in china

Studies on ethnic groups in china. is supported in part by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to the Henry M. Jackson School ofInternational Studies of the University of Washington. The publication of Familiar Strangers: A History of Muslims in Northwest China is supported in part by a grant from the Henry M. Jackson Foundation.

Yet today there are about 15 million Muslims in China, centered mostly in the northwest (Xinjiang province), along the margins of the old Silk Road

Yet today there are about 15 million Muslims in China, centered mostly in the northwest (Xinjiang province), along the margins of the old Silk Road. And they aren't just an insignificant minority:.

The vast majority of China's Muslims are Sunni Muslims, although some Salafi groups are also past. The style of architecture of Hui Mosques varies according to their sect. The traditionalist Gedimu Hanafi Sunnis, influenced by Chinese culture, build Mosques which look like Chinese temples. The reformist modernist (but originally Wahhabi inspired) Yihewani build their Mosques to look like Middle Eastern Arab style Mosques.

The Chinese-speaking Muslims have for centuries been an inseperable but anomalous part of Chinese society--Sinophone yet incomprehensible, local yet outsiders, normal but different. Long regarded by the Chinese government as prone to violence, they have challenged fundamental Chinese conceptiosn of Self and Other and denied the totally transforming power of Chinese civilization by tenaciously maintaining connectios with Central and West Asia as well as some cultural differences from their non-Muslim neighbors.Familiar Strangers narrates a history of the Muslims of northwest China, at the intersection of the frontiers of the Mongolian-Manchu, Tibetan, Turkic, and Chinese cultural regions. Based on primary and secondary sources in a variety of languages, Familiar Strangers examines the nature of ethnicity and periphery, the role of religion and ethnicity in personal and collective decisions in violent times, and the complexity of belonging to two cultures at once. Concerning itself with a frontier very distant from the core areas of Chinese culture and very strange to most Chinese, it explores the influence of language, religion, and place on Sino-Muslim identity.
Comments: (3)
Zovaithug
Islam in China is sadly a story of being ignored and overlooked even among academics. Lipman is one of those few scholars today that write about this fascinating form of Islam and their adherents. The approach Lipman takes is one of adaptation and local circumstances on the subject of Chinese Islam. It's a objective yet understanding book that is lightyears better than what Western media and Right-Wing politicians report. The book in question mainly talks about the Muslims of Northwestern China especially of the Gansu region. This book gives a comprehensive history of Islam in China from its arrival in the 7th century up to 1930. Valuable study aids include many maps, photos, a glossary, enlightening footnotes, and a fine bibliography for further reading.

This book is unique in scope and subject but there a few problems it had. The limited attention to just the Northwest and the Gansu region is constricting. While the book takes a broad historical approach towards Islam from Tang to Ming China, it further narrows to just the Northwest starting from the Qing Dynasty. The book does mention Islam within the southwest, southeast, and the central China but only in passing with little detail. As the book reaches Qing times, the author's writing becomes more dull and a little confusing. He just throws names, conflicts, and events with little appropriate background. The writing beomes boring as he just starts writing in a almost repetitive tiresome style.
But even with those flaws, it's undeniable that this book is one of the best devoted to Chinese Islamic history, sects, philosophy, culture, art, and literature. A essential read for Chinese Muslims, scholars, students, or interested lay readers.
Perongafa
Most Americans don't know squat about Islam itself, let alone Islam in China. Yet today there are about 15 million Muslims in China, centered mostly in the northwest (Xinjiang province), along the margins of the old Silk Road. And they aren't just an insignificant minority: in the Middle Ages, for instance, Chinese Muslims played a central role in bridging the gulf between China, the Middle East, and Europe, bringing goods and knowledge both ways. (...)
Jonathan Lipman's "Familiar Strangers" explores some aspects of Islam in northwestern China from the first arrival of Muslims there in the 8th century up through the 20th. Like most similar histories, it revolves around two major dilemmas that have constantly faced Chinese Muslims (as opposed to non-Chinese Muslims living in China): first, is Islam compatible with Chinese culture? and second, can Chinese Muslims themselves properly be considered Chinese? China's "host" culture has always tended to absorb alien peoples and faiths -- whether they're Mongols and Turks (the so-called "barbarians"), Buddhists from India, or whoever. There were always strangers lurking at the gates of China, drooling with envy or burning with ambition, but almost every one of them who managed to break through eventually assimilated and became, in effect, Chinese: in fact, many sought to do so in the first place. But Muslims were an exception. Their Islamic faith forbade them to have the same kind of relationship with traditional Chinese culture as other groups: for instance, ancestor worship and reverencing the emperor were antipathetic to Islam. Consequently, Chinese Muslims were, while not complete strangers, "familiar strangers", ethnically Chinese, foreign by affiliation.
Lipman's history isn't a comprehensive account of Muslim culture on the northwestern Chinese frontier. Instead, it examines how Chinese Muslims reacted to the complexity of belonging to two cultures at once. Lipman explores, for instance, Muslim reaction to acculturation policies under the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and Muslims' role as "strangers in bad times" during the Ming-Qing cataclysm in the 1640s. Chapter 3, "Connections: Muslims in the Early Qing, 1644-1781", analyses the introduction of Naqshabandiya Sufism into China in the early 17th century and the struggle between two rival forms of it -- the orthodox Khafiya and the radical Jahriya -- in the 18th century, the latter a branch of revivalist Wahhabism, the earliest modern version of so-called Islamic "fundamentalism". Chapter 4, "Strategies of Resistance," explores the period between 1784 and 1895, looking at three large-scale Muslim rebellions against the Qing state. Chapter 5 examines Muslim "Strategies of Integration" during the Nationalist period and under the People's Republic. Finally, Lipman sums his findings in chapter 6.
The book is a scholarly read and not always easy going. If you don't have much previous knowledge of Chinese history, start elsewhere. But if you've got the background, it's a great read.
Dranar
The first time I got the book from a Chinese Muslim scholar, I began to search what i am Intersted and i got it. I t is about a Islamic sect Xidaodang in which I am one member.Mr. Lipman has been in Xidaotang once and did some research on the group.His book shows his description and study are not only successful, but objective as well.He has his own unique view on Chinese Muslim...