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eBook How to Read Church History Volume One: From the beginnings to the fifteenth century (v. 1) download

by J. Bowden,Jean Comby

eBook How to Read Church History Volume One: From the beginnings to the fifteenth century (v. 1) download ISBN: 0334020506
Author: J. Bowden,Jean Comby
Publisher: SCM Press; 1st Ed. edition (September 2, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 202
ePub: 1403 kb
Fb2: 1358 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc azw docx lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: World

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Jean Comby, J. Bowden.

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Jean Comby's text, 'How to Read Church History: Volume 1', covers the period from the beginnings of the church to the time of the beginnings of the Reformation in the fifteenth century. It is part of a series by the Crossroad Press on how to read or study different aspects of church history, practice, and belief. Divided into ten chapters, it examines the early, pre-institutional church, the church fathers, the consolidation of the institutional church, the medieval period, the East/West split, and the overarching society known as Christendom. This text was originally published.

to the Fifteenth Century. Previous page Next page.

How to Read Church History: From the Beginnings to the Fifteenth Century v. 1 by Jean Comby (Author), J. Bowden (Translator) How to Read Church History: From the Reformation to the Present Day v. 2 by Jean Comby (Author), Diarmaid MacCulloch (Author), J. Bowden (Translator), M. Lydamore (Translator) And for those auditing the.

Book Format: Paperback. Specifically geared to the adult learner; adaptable to individual, parish, and other group needs; and richly illustrated with photos and charts, this two volume set helps teachers and students connect the content of each text with their own life experiences and the community in which they live. The Crossroad Adult Christian Formation. The Crossroad Publishing Company.

Paperback published September 2011.

Jean Comby collaborated with Diarmaid MacCulloch for the text, 'How to Read Church History: Volume 2', which covers the period from the beginnings of the Reformation in the fifteenth century to the near present time (Vatican II and the immediate aftermath)

Jean Comby collaborated with Diarmaid MacCulloch for the text, 'How to Read Church History: Volume 2', which covers the period from the beginnings of the Reformation in the fifteenth century to the near present time (Vatican II and the immediate aftermath). It is part of a series by the Crossroad Press on how to read or study different aspects of church history, practice, and belief

This book does not separate church history from the wider history of the world in which it is set, uses all available traces of the past to tell it's story, provides direct quotations from the written sources in translation. Vol 2 also available.
Comments: (6)
salivan
Doing Sonlight? Want to study God's Kingdom and the story of Christian Faith? Looking for a through text? Then this book is one for your library. Full of great information, stories and more. This book is great for those in the Charlotte Mason or Unit Study methods that are looking for a great study of the Christian History.
Oreavi
I purchased the book for a class my husband and I were taking and needed it quickly. I got it very soon after purchasing and the condition was even better than I'd hoped for. This book is very easy to follow and quite interesting.
Danrad
Whoever designed the textural format of this book should go back to school. It is horrid !! The information almost seems hidden. I was always having to turn pages back and forth.
Cesar
This short survey (at under 200 pp.) is a quick chronological look at Christendom from the Resurrection of Jesus/Acts of the Apostles in the 1st Century AD to the Age of Exploration in the 1400s. Comby supports her arguments with excerpts from independent source documents, and unlike another reviewer, I think her way of organizing these references in the side margins is extremely easy to follow. If you would like to read more than the excerpt, she provides a comprehensive bibliography for further reading at the end of each chapter. Besides the supporting historical documents, I really appreciate the way she weaves Church History into the broader universal history of the West so that we see the Church responding to their historical context and culture instead of acting in a vacuum. Highly recommended for high school students and adult laity.
Dangerous
Jean Comby's text, 'How to Read Church History: Volume 1', covers the period from the beginnings of the church to the time of the beginnings of the Reformation in the fifteenth century. It is part of a series by the Crossroad Press on how to read or study different aspects of church history, practice, and belief. Divided into ten chapters, it examines the early, pre-institutional church, the church fathers, the consolidation of the institutional church, the medieval period, the East/West split, and the overarching society known as Christendom.
This text was originally published in French, translated a few years later for the benefit of English-reading audiences. For a book that was prepared before the wide-spread influence of the internet, it bears a remarkable similarity to modern web pages in its format and design. There are boxes, highlighted areas, pull-quotes, sidebars and other features throughout -- this is no simple, boring narrative. There are charts (chronologies, canons, etc.), maps, timelines, definitions, line-art drawings, and more.
Church history is a history of people in the world. Thus, a good deal of space is devoted to explaining the world in which Christianity existed. The religion shaped the culture, and vice versa. Church history exists largely in the documentary evidence and the physical evidence from the past, so language, art, architecture, archaeology, religious and historical writings are all important. No one anthology or narrative history will be able to incorporate the fullness of Christian history (as the author admits), nor do most people (even scholars) have the time and resources needed to investigate all possible sources of information. Chapters do have recommended reading lists on each topic.
Each of the ten chapters is brief, supplemented with maps, charts, boxes, and more. The narrative history could be read in but a few sittings (perhaps, for the quick reader, even in one sitting). This can then be fleshed out by including the complementary information upon second reading. Like much of history, some memorisation of dates, persons, places, movements, etc. would be helpful -- the style of this text makes that much more easy to do. There is a great deal of diversity within the history of the church, with lots of strands that can easily become confusing. The format of this book lays out the different lines in an organised way, showing the divergences and the inter-relationships well.
This is a book of context and background. It does not take the place of doing reading in the primary texts. One will never get the true sense from Augustine's 'Confessions' by reading the summary here. However, one will get a greater appreciation for the larger Christian and Roman context into which Augustine was born and from which Augustine was writing. To this end, Comby gives suggestions on how to read the ancient texts, reminding the reader here that the worldview was quite different, and the presumed message from the the text will be different today than in the past. Also recommended are more modern surveys of history, from the different perspectives within Christianity and academia.
Interesting, accessible, full of great information, this book helps to make church history (a much neglected subject by many churches and many schools) come alive for the modern reader. Comby's intention is specifically to bring up those parts of history most relevant and useful in modern contexts and practice.
Tiv
I will admit I found this a tad deceptive that the book was labeled as "church history" when in fact, the history presented is largely that of a Roman Catholic bias. Most of the information presented is accurate to an extent, if you consider the catholic bias, and presents a high-level overview of many of the historical events that developed through the history of Christianity, but then it veers into non-Scriptural explanations of practices like the celebacy of priests (p.139-140) a horrid distortion of God's design. And when we reach the 15th century reformation heroes like Wycliffe and Hus only get a marginal note in the "human problems" section (p.181), even though these "problems" were instrumental in breaking the shackles of Rome and returning the church to Christ-exalting sola scriptura. Also, in real history, the 15th century was also noted by extraordinary persecutions of protestants, but I didn't find a peep about the Lollards or any of that. In fact, I've got a book called the Martyrs Mirror that details, in over 1000 pages, the history of the persecutions of Rome on the Anabaptists. No mention of any of that here, and honestly that was a much more worthy read than this bias and distorted work.