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eBook The Crusades Through Arab Eyes download

by Amin Maalouf

eBook The Crusades Through Arab Eyes download ISBN: 080520833X
Author: Amin Maalouf
Publisher: Schocken; First Paperback Ed. edition (January 13, 1985)
Language: English
ePub: 1188 kb
Fb2: 1598 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr lit docx azw
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Home Amin Maalouf The Crusades Through Arab Eyes. Arabic words and names in this book have been transliterated according to a system that allows those who know the Arabic alphabet to reconstruct the original spelling.

Home Amin Maalouf The Crusades Through Arab Eyes. The crusades through ar. .The Crusades Through Arab Eyes, . Readers curious about the pronunciation of these names and words can refer to the ‘Note on Pronunciation’ at the back of the book. Others will not miss much if they simply ignore the dots and bars of the transliteration and pronounce the words as if they were English. Where a name or word has a standard English form (like Saladin), it has been used.

The Crusades Through Arab Eyes may be warmly recommended to lay-readers and students alike. The Times Literary Supplement (London). From the Inside Flap. If you are not a student of the Levant Crusades you will be confused and bored with this book. Maalouf provides insight from the Arab chroniclers of the time to describe the mood and thoughts of rulers and peoples of the Levant during this time.

This is what 'The Crusades Through Arab Eyes' about .

This is what 'The Crusades Through Arab Eyes' about: European and Arab versions of the Crusades have little in common. Amin Maalouf has sifted through the works of a score of contemporary Arab chroniclers of the Crusades, eyewitness and often participants in the events.

The Arab fascinated and terrified by these Franj, whom they encountered as barbarians and defeated, but who subsequently managed to dominate the earth-cannot bring itself to consider the Crusades a mere.

The Arab fascinated and terrified by these Franj, whom they encountered as barbarians and defeated, but who subsequently managed to dominate the earth-cannot bring itself to consider the Crusades a mere episode in the bygone past It is often surprising to discover the extent to which the attitude of the Arabs (and of Muslims in general) towards the West i. Of the three divisions of the Palestine Liberation Army, one bears the name Ḥiṭṭīn and another ‘Ayn Jālūt. In his days of glory, President Nasser was regularly compared to Saladin, who, like him, had united Syria and Egypt-and even Yemen!

The Crusades Through Arab Eyes. The Crusades Through Arab Eyes.

The Crusades Through Arab Eyes.

Amin Maalouf has sifted through the works of a score of contemporary Arab chroniclers of the Crusades, eyewitnesses and often participants in the events. He retells their stories in their own vivacious style, giving us a vivid portrait of a society rent by internal conflicts and shaken by a traumatic encounter with an alien culture. He retraces two critical centuries of Middle Eastern history, and offers fascinating insights into some of the forces that shape Arab and Islamic consciousness today.

2 results for h-arab-eyes". by Amin Maalouf and Frank Wynne 12 May 2020. Oil Crusades: America Through Arab Eyes. by Abdulhay Yahya Zalloum 20 May 2007.

European and Arab versions of the Crusades have little in common. For Arabs, the twelfth and thirteenth centuries were years of strenuous efforts to repel a brutal and destructive invasion by barbarian hordes

European and Arab versions of the Crusades have little in common. For Arabs, the twelfth and thirteenth centuries were years of strenuous efforts to repel a brutal and destructive invasion by barbarian hordes. In "The Crusades Through Arab Eyes", Amin Maalouf has sifted through the works of a score of contemporary Arab chroniclers of the Crusades, eyewitnesses and often participants in the events

Comments: (7)
Gardagar
Your jaw will be on the floor the entire time you're reading this book. It disposes of the dry expository style of most works of medieval history and instead takes on the narrative style of a novel. The unexpected twists of fate, spycraft, betrayals, assassinations, battlefield ingenuity, and unlikely alliances that make up the various kingdoms and city-states of the Middle East are laid out in a way where you'll genuinely get invested in these "characters" of history. You'll find yourself holding out hope that this time they'll stop the mysterious Frankish hordes, or rooting for Damascus over Aleppo or Acre over Jerusalem, only to suddenly have that hope smashed against the wall by marauding Turkish prince or a hashish-smoking Assassin from Iran.

At the same time, Maalouf keeps his story completely based in hard research into *Arabic* primary sources of the time period, which is something only a tiny minority of the foremost "experts" on Middle Eastern history today ever even bother with. He maintains his credibility as a historian yet shows incredible prowess as a storywriter, seamlessly citing inline while encouraging the reader to be skeptical where appropriate. Writers like Ibn al-Athir become characters in and of themselves, contextualized into their own time periods and priorities as writers. Eurocentricity never once makes an appearance, keeping true to the title of the book by keeping you as informed or in-the-dark about the Europe of this period as the Muslims were then. Maalouf doesn't fall into a single racist trope about fanatical Muslims or anachronistic ideas of ethno-religious identity, ever the easy escape of the lazy Middle East expert. He does the hard work of showing you with hard fact the precise political motivations of every little prince of every little city, painting a beautiful picture of the region and time period that will leave you wishing for a TV adaptation of his work.
Hiclerlsi
Amin Maalouf gets the job done in presenting how Arabs( being Muslim, Christian, Jewish) viewed the coming of the Crusades and what it meant to them.
What was interesting while reading this book was how diverse this conflict was with the various factions amongst the Christian and Muslim forces.
I feel that this book is a must because it shows a different side to the conflict that people tend to not consider while examining the crusades.
I feel this book can be paralleled to how Arabs view todays conflicts amongst Sunni/Shia, and Arab Israeli conflicts. I feel it is critical to understand both perspectives in conflicts because it enables more understanding amongst people in volatile regions such as the middle east.
Inth
This book fulfills its promise of an alternative perspective on the crusades based on the surviving Eastern primary source material. The author does an excellent job of composing an engaging and complete narrative from the sources while keeping in touch with the intent and biases of the underlying material. Recurring themes include:

- The fragmented state of the Middle East during the time of the crusades
- How Muslims viewed the crusades, the crusader states, and Western leaders
- Diplomatic and trade interaction between East and West
- The complicated mix of religious and secular drivers for Jihad
- Conflicting and complex motives of principal Muslim rulers
Dordred
I was recommended this book and i must say that it went beyond any expectation i had. Maalouf presents the Arab chronists accounts of the crusades and in those accounts one can see just how biased is the history one is told, if at all, of those fanatical endeavors. I was delighted to find that Arab chronists recorded the good deeds as well as the bad ones from both sides: Christians and Arabs.
In this book I found something else that i treasure in a book: it makes me analyze and reflect on my point of view, through its honesty.
This book is highly recommended for the intellectually honest individual who has an open mind and understands that true history is not written by the victors.
Cerar
First and foremost this is an excellent read. If more books were like it more people would read and learn about history.

A great eye opener for those of us educated in the West on the great and noble knights of the Crusades. Without being long winded the strength of the book is that it uses the words of those historians that were contemporary with the events. Maalouf fills in details about the place and time the historian was writing from. Of course all historians have their own bias and this book helps bring to light the Occidental vs. Oriental viewpoints.

Of the many revelations book shows makes, for me, the degree to which Islamic Empire (not merely the Arab empire) was fractured and suffered from infighting as the Europeans did was fancinating - and revealed why both sides were much less effective and unified as armies. The biggest surprises were how much "Crusading" (plundering) took place in Egypt adding strength to the saying "Follow the Money." If your view the nobleness of the Crusades and Knighthood is sacred to you ... do not read this. Buy Ivanhoe.