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eBook Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort download

by Liz Trotta

eBook Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort download ISBN: 0060682744
Author: Liz Trotta
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco; 1st edition (May 19, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 270
ePub: 1604 kb
Fb2: 1754 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf mobi doc docx
Category: History
Subcategory: World

The patron of desperate causes, Saint Jude is best known for his miraculous powers of healing and rescue

The patron of desperate causes, Saint Jude is best known for his miraculous powers of healing and rescue. Even worse, the statement that the author is a "lapsed Catholic" is totally false

Trotta, Liz. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Trotta, Liz. Uploaded by Francis Ong on January 22, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Trotta's book is part celebration of the devotion to Jude and part travelogue as she sets out in quest of Jude's legacy from Baltimore to New York and from Edessa to Rome. During the Vietnam War, she made history as the first w Trotta's book is part celebration of the devotion to Jude and part travelogue as she sets out in quest of Jude's legacy from Baltimore to New York and from Edessa to Rome.

A superficial treatment of the patron saint of hopeless causes

A superficial treatment of the patron saint of hopeless causes. Trotta (Fighting for Air: In the Trenches with Television News, 1991), New York bureau chief of the Washington Times, paints herself as a hard-nosed reporter who, as a lapsed Catholic, is an unusual author for a book on a Catholic saint. But the book shows few of those hard edges; if anything, it's ahistorical, sentimental, and shallow. Pan of this is due to Trotta's neglect of other studies of Jude. But just because Trotta hasn't done her homework doesn't mean that the definitive book on Jude isn't already out there: It's the vastly superior Thank You, Saint Jude, by Robert Orsi.

In July 2008, the Monastery of Saint Thaddeus was added to UNESCO's World Heritage List, along with two other Armenian monuments in the same province . Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort By Liz Trotta. "Thadeus Monastery – Armenica.

In July 2008, the Monastery of Saint Thaddeus was added to UNESCO's World Heritage List, along with two other Armenian monuments in the same province: the Monastery of Saint Stepanos and the Chapel of Dzordzor. McBirnie, William Steuart.

Many people know St. Jude only from a stranger's classified ad thanking him for prayers answered and favors granted

Many people know St. Jude only from a stranger's classified ad thanking him for prayers answered and favors granted. Others know that, as one woman quoted in Liz Trotta's book Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of the Last Resort says, "If you're in a tough spot, this is the man to call.

As though guided by Jude himself, Trotta encounters an extraordinary number of meaningful coincidences - synchronicities . Jude is on call, right down to the softest prayer, the smallest hope.

As though guided by Jude himself, Trotta encounters an extraordinary number of meaningful coincidences - synchronicities which are the very heart of the Jude experience. In every city, at every turn, her sleuthing seems led by an invisible hand, drawing her down narrow alleyways, towards rarely seen relics, to conversations with miracle-seeking people with AIDS. Once lost himself - on the map and in history - he is found among those lost who, accepting their solitariness, take refuge in his invisible presence.

Written by. Liz Trotta. Manufacturer: HarperSanFrancisco Release date: 1 May 1998 ISBN-10 : 0060682744 ISBN-13: 9780060682743.

A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort. Published February 15, 2005 by HarperOne. VINCENZO PULLARA, A PLUMP STUBBY MAN, wears the smoldering expression of one who harbors dark secrets.

I would say that Liz Trotta's work is more comprehensive than Orsi's Thank you St. Jude

I would say that Liz Trotta's work is more comprehensive than Orsi's Thank you St. Jude. Orsi spends his energies on the CLaritian Shrine of St. Jude in Chicago. Even worse, the statement that the author is a "lapsed Catholic" is totally false.

"Anything but high profile by nature, Jude's persona, his essence, occupies the quiet end of a saintly spectrum that includes Paul, the dynamic and even over bearing preacher; Peter, the swashbuckling sailor who lost his nerve at the crucial moment; and St. Teresa of Avila, the mystical yet outspoken intellectual. Jude is the workmanlike spiritual mechanic, the one who does his job and moves on. Approaching him takes no energy and is as secret as shouting in a cave for help."

The patron of desperate cases, Saint Jude is known as much for his miraculous powers of healing and rescue as for the obscurity of his history. A most beloved and enigmatic apostle, Jude remains -- even more now than in his own time -- the ecumenical figure of hope.

In this riveting investigation of faith and legend, award-winning journalist Liz Trotta follows the footsteps of the New Testament's most elusive saint through Italy, Turkey, the lands of Old Armenia, and the United States in search of the shadowy origins, history, and sacred sites of Jude Thaddeus. A modern-day pilgrimage, Jude is filled with rich historical lore, insightful reportage, poignant anecdotes, and personal reflections.

As though guided by Jude himself, Trotta encounters an extraordinary number of meaningful coincidences -- synchronicities which are the very heart of the Jude experience. In every city, at every turn, her sleuthing seems led by an invisible hand, drawing her down narrow alleyways, towards rarely seen relics, to conversations with miracle-seeking people with AIDS. Each experience an added tile, this portrait of Jude emerges as a beautifully rendered mosaic, filled with colorful history, strange artifacts, and stories of the miraculous powers of faith.

"Jude is on call, right down to the softest prayer, the smallest hope. Once lost himself -- on the map and in history -- he is found among those lost who, accepting their solitariness, take refuge in his invisible presence. From East to West, from the first century to the brink of the twenty-first, his message vibrates in the hallow reaches of the unanchored modern world."

Comments: (5)
Malalanim
Perfect!
Kirizan
One reads on this web site the Kirkus review of Liz Trotta's latest book: "Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort" with a sense of wonder whether the reviewer ever got beyond the introduction. For readers who expect reviewers to help them make a decision about what to read, the Kirkus review should be dismissed as unscholarly, ill informed and professionally third-rate. Even worse, the statement that the author is a "lapsed Catholic" is totally false. Liz Trotta is a devout, Church-going Catholic and to throw in such a charge reveals a startling disdain for accuracy. Without a modicum of objectivity, Kirkus fails to deal with Trotta's travels through the lands Jude travelled; her interviews with priests and laity involved in the Jude spiritual phenomena; the numerous shrines devoted to St. Jude she visited in America, Europe and the Middle East; the reading of volumes of historical documents and petitions made to the saint; all with an investigative reporter's keen sensibilities. "Jude: A Pilgrimage to the Saint of Last Resort" is a great read for the millions who are not only interested in Jude and the devotions surrounding this particular saint but also for those who know essentially nothing about him and are curious about the history of his life and times and why people the world over seek his help when faced with seemingly hopeless causes. For a more accurate and justifiably glowing review of the book, see Publisher's weekly.
Mr.Champions
I am neither a Catholic nor a believer in St. Jude, but this book is wonderful historical, anthropoligical and socialogical study in how Jude survives in legend and in devotion. The author writes beautifully, elegantly, magically and shows the how the inspiration of Jude provides comfort and solace to his followers. The beauty of St. Jude is not found in his large deeds, but in his personal and practical assistance to the afflicted. His small intercessions are not trivial, they are evidence of his kindness and his democratic accessability to all.
Zolorn
I would say that Liz Trotta's work is more comprehensive than Orsi's Thank you St. Jude. Orsi spends his energies on the CLaritian Shrine of St. Jude in Chicago. If you read his book you would not know that there are numerous shrines of St. Jude: Baltimore, New York, Dominicans in Chicago, San Francisco. Trotta's work devotes chapters to all of these. Almost every story of St. Jude is recorded in her Jude. I believe that as a journalist she has a different mission from the Scholar, Robert Orsi with all his footnotes and bibliography. Both serve devotion to St. Jude! But with different styles and energies.
Dondallon
I was disappointed by this book. It lacks the compelling flow of Walking the Bible, or of John McPhee's books. It drifts from one shrine to another and seems to make the same generalizations at each one. Recommended for people who are fascinated by the minutia of St. Jude.