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by David France

eBook Our Fathers: The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal download ISBN: 0767914066
Author: David France
Publisher: Broadway; Reprint edition (April 5, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 672
ePub: 1656 kb
Fb2: 1791 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mobi mbr txt
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Our Fathers novel by David France. The screenplay was written by Thomas Michael Donnelly, based on the book Our Fathers: The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal by David France

Our Fathers novel by David France. Written by. Thomas Michael Donnelly. The screenplay was written by Thomas Michael Donnelly, based on the book Our Fathers: The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal by David France. It was the last film directed by Dan Curtis, who died soon after it was finished.

David France (B. 1959) is an American investigative reporter and openly gay non-fiction author and filmmaker, who is. .

He wrote in this 2004 book, " celibacy encyclical burst open the dams. Most of us non-Catholics followed the breaking story of the sex-abuse scandal within the Catholic church that rocked the nation a few years ago in news reports that originated from the Boston Globe and spread throughout the nation.

Our Fathers is history at its best-as intimate as a diary, as immediate. Father John McNeill’s book The Church and the Homosexual dealt with some of the issue related to chastity and its impact on homosexuals as opposed to heterosexuals in an environment that demanded chastity. This is not an equivalent demand for a heterosexual priest and a homosexual priest. Most people miss that, they seem to deal with the fact that chastity would be the same thing for both groups.

David France takes us back to the church of the 1950s, a time of relative innocence, to look for answers. With deft nuance, he crafts a panoramic portrait of the faithful, encompassing the hopes, dreams, disappointments, and courage of hundreds of Catholic and non-Catholic families over the last fifty years. Based on hundreds of interviews, private correspondence, unpublished scientific probes and secret Vatican documents, and tens of thousands of pages of court records, he shows how the church’s institutional suspicion of human sexuality ironically lit the fuse on the crisis.

The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal. 656 pp. New York: Broadway Books. WHAT is there still to be said about priestly pedophilia?

The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal. WHAT is there still to be said about priestly pedophilia? The amount of ink, the number of television hours devoted to the issue might be expected to have induced a kind of atrocity fatigue in the American public, Catholic and non-Catholic alike.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Our fathers: the secret life of the Catholic Church in an age of scandal. Losing Our Virtue: Why the Church Must Recover Its Moral Vision (Epub & Mobi). Скачать (PDF) . Читать. Double Standard: Abuse Scandals and the Attack on the Catholic Church. 2 Mb. Will the Real Church Please Stand Up (Epub & Mobi). James David Montgomery.

Somehow, David France's book "Our Fathers" manages to encapsulate the events into a very approachable, readable tome that documents thoroughly the eventual unmasking of the American Catholic church in its response to child abuse

Somehow, David France's book "Our Fathers" manages to encapsulate the events into a very approachable, readable tome that documents thoroughly the eventual unmasking of the American Catholic church in its response to child abuse.

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1990); David France, Our Fathers: The Secret Life of the Catholic Church in an Age of Scandal (2004. For information, address Atria Books Subsidiary Rights Department, 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020.

; and the much-criticized but valid John Cornwell, Dark Box: A Secret History of Confession (2014). and colophon are trademarks of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Our Fathers is history at its best—as intimate as a diary, as immediate and epic as a novel.When, in early 2002, a team of Boston Globe reporters broke open the pedophilia scandal around Father John J. Geoghan—and then Paul Shanley, Joseph Birmingham, and hundreds of other priests in Boston and across the country—the entire American Catholic Church spun into crisis. But by that time, the damage was already done. Perhaps a hundred thousand children had already fallen into traps laid by their priests. Every Catholic in the country – and everyone who had ever set foot in a church—faced troubling questions: Why had this happened? How could the secrets of this abuse have been so widely held, and so closely protected? How could the church have let it happen?David France takes us back to the church of the 1950s, a time of relative innocence, to look for answers. With deft nuance, he crafts a panoramic portrait of the faithful, encompassing the hopes, dreams, disappointments, and courage of hundreds of Catholic and non-Catholic families over the last fifty years. Based on hundreds of interviews, private correspondence, unpublished scientific probes and secret Vatican documents, and tens of thousands of pages of court records, he shows how the church’s institutional suspicion of human sexuality ironically lit the fuse on the crisis. Our Fathers braids a heartbreaking narrative from the personal lives of good and bad priests, pious and heartless prelates, self-interested lawyers turned heroes, holy altar boys turned drug-addicts, mothers torn between their children and their faith, hard-bitten investigative reporters reduced to tears, and thousands of church critics who, through this crisis, returned to their faith renewed and invigorated. He shows us the intense history of dissent within the ranks, especially regarding Catholic teachings on sexuality and homosexuality. He tells the heroic stories of whistle-blowing nuns, independent pastors, church insiders trying to do the right thing, and—ultimately—a group of blue-collar men, all molested by the same priest, who overcame their bitterness and took it upon themselves to try to save their church. This book is a tribute to those ordinary Catholics called upon to make extraordinary contributions. Our Fathers is the sweeping, authoritative, and gripping work the scandal and its aftermath demand.From the Hardcover edition.
Comments: (7)
Dori
David France (B. 1959) is an American investigative reporter and openly gay non-fiction author and filmmaker, who is a contributing editor for New York magazine and former Newsweek senior editor; he also wrote Bag of Toys: Sex, Scandal, and the Death Mask Murder.

He wrote in this 2004 book, "[Pope Paul VI's] celibacy encyclical burst open the dams. In 1968, 1,023 priests would lay down their Roman collars, followed by 1,526 in 1969, 3.500 in 1970, 4,500 in 1971. By 1980, over twenty thousand American priests would abdicate, most leaving and marrying right away, some openly embracing the precepts of the free-love generation... the overwhelming majority (63 percent) admitted they left for a particular woman. One-third specifically cited the pope's reaffirmation of celibacy as the last straw. Asked to say what they least liked about the priestly culture they had left behind, 79 percent called it 'psychosexually unhealthy.'" (Pg. 42)

He quotes a 1971 report delivered to Church leaders by a Catholic psychiatrist, who said, "we estimate that 10-15 percent of all priests in Western Europe and North America are mature; 20-25 percent have serious psychiatric difficulties, especially in the form of neuroses and chronic alcoholism, or a combination of both; and 60-70 percent suffer from a degree of emotional immaturity which does not prevent them from exercising their priestly function, but precludes them from being happy men and effective priests whose fundamental role is to bring the joy of Christ's love and to be the appointed affirmers of men." (Pg. 87)

Of Church-affiliated facilities for sexually predatory priests, he says, "Their existence was kept a closely held secret. It would not look right. It might even suggest that the priesthood had a unique problem with sexual deviance. What other profession operated its own clinics for pedophiles, ephebophiles, and sexual predators? But several hundred priests had graduated from these precincts, most all of them deemed safe to place back in ministry. There was even talk of using church coffers to buy an island in the Caribbean for treating and, when needed, warehousing problem priests." (Pg. 151)

He points out, "Were homosexual priests more libidinous---and therefore less likely to live in chastity? Not according to two significant surveys. In one, 16.2 percent of straight priests reported being sexually active, versus 10.7 for gays; another, a random survey of eighty American priests... found that nearly one-third of heterosexual priests were sexually active, while fewer than one-fourth of the homosexuals were." (Pg. 169)

Once the scandal in Boston in 2002 hit, "the number of Boston area priests suspected of child abuse now topped a hundred. Most had multiple accusations against them. According to church officials, on average each was transferred to at least two subsequent churches, perhaps exposing them to two-thirds of all Boston-area parishes." (Pg. 437) He adds, "Boston's Catholic Charities had already been forced to lay off over 250 employees. The Cardinal's appeal was faring worse... Thirty percent of archdiocesan staffers had been laid off in recent weeks. There was talk of bankruptcy." (Pg. 527) And according to the New York Times, "of the e1,774 priests ordained between 1950 and 2002, 5.3 percent drew complaints about sexual wrongdoing." (Pg. 562)

This detailed account of the scandal will be of keen interest to anyone studying this matter.
Delalbine
Most of us non-Catholics followed the breaking story of the sex-abuse scandal within the Catholic church that rocked the nation a few years ago in news reports that originated from the Boston Globe and spread throughout the nation. David France's book brings the fascinating, horrifying tale together in this volume whose chronology spans half a century. France, a senior editor for Newsweek magazine, has combined original reporting with a wealth of sources to paint a picture of a deeply afflicted institution that seems incapable of healing itself. The individual tales of predatory priests unpunished and the young men and women whose lives they destroyed are difficult enough to read; even more appalling is the systematic defensive reaction of church superiors, who shuffled offending priests from parish to parish, sent them to inadequate treatment facilities, and never reported their criminal offenses to secular authorities. Then, when the scandal broke and lawsuits began pouring in, their defense was to stonewall and obfuscate at every possible opportunity.

France juggles a large cast of heroes and villains with a sure hand, though his quasi-cinematic technique of cutting back and forth between different stories occasionally makes the narrative too fragmented. His only serious failing is that, by keeping himself consistently in the background, he does not tie the entire tale together, so that the reader is left wondering what, if anything, has come of this whole sorry saga. One would guess that the death of John Paul II and the ascendancy of Cardinal Ratzinger to pope, both of whom come off in the book as insensitive to the crisis, bodes ill for any meaningful reform within the church for years to come.
Nirad
This book is an absolutely horrifying indictment of the Catholic Church. In chapter after chapter of searing personal anecdotes, rather than dry abstractions, the author shows the devastating, life-long effects that being abused by priests has on the victims. Interwoven with the victims' stories are the stories of the abusers: those sordid, shoddy, worthless excuses for human beings who used the enormous power of their priesthood to victimize thousands of children and adolescents, and then terrify them into silence. And on top of that, the author also details the relentless campaign of coverups that the higher clergy engaged in: concealing the priests' misdeeds, and assigning them to other parishes where they continued to molest children, or sending them off to "retreat centers" where they would supposedly be "cured." Then, of course, they were forgiven their trespasses and allowed to begin trespassing anew. A final obscenity is the Catholic Church's decision to blame the whole problem on the "homosexualization" of the priesthood, although study after study has shown that child molesters are rarely homosexuals, and homosexuals are hardly ever child molesters.

The book proves how hollow the concepts of forgiveness and redemption are with regard to such incorrigible men: these abusers can NEVER be forgiven or redeemed: they should all be locked up in chains in dungeons somewhere and left to rot. Instead, they're protected, coddled, cared for and endlessly "forgiven" by a solicitous hierarchy, while the victims are left to stew in their own bitterness, helplessness and rage. What a totally ugly and profoundly disturbing picture. How can anyone retain a shred of allegiance to an institution that permits such monstrous misdeeds to go for the most part unpunished?