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eBook Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland after Auschwitz: An Essay in Historical Interpretation download

by Jan T. Gross

eBook Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland after Auschwitz: An Essay in Historical Interpretation download ISBN: 0691128782
Author: Jan T. Gross
Publisher: Princeton University Press (August 6, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1815 kb
Fb2: 1319 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mobi lrf mbr lit
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland after Auschwitz: An Essay in Historical Interpretation, is a book by Jan T. Gross, published by Random House and Princeton University Press in 2006

Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland after Auschwitz: An Essay in Historical Interpretation, is a book by Jan T. Gross, published by Random House and Princeton University Press in 2006.

Jan Gross's Fear attempts to answer a perplexing question: How was anti-Semitism possible in Poland after the war? At the center of his investigation is a detailed reconstruction of the Kielce pogrom and the reactions it evoked in various milieus of Polish society

Jan Gross's Fear attempts to answer a perplexing question: How was anti-Semitism possible in Poland after the war? At the center of his investigation is a detailed reconstruction of the Kielce pogrom and the reactions it evoked in various milieus of Polish society.

Poland suffered an exceedingly brutal Nazi occupation during the Second World. In attempting to explain anti-Semitism in Poland after the war, Gross rejects, with well supported arguments, two common explanations: Jews were not killing Christian children for their blood, nor were Jews responsible for bringing Communism to Poland. The chapter on this latter point is longer than necessary, in my opinion. Gross also rejects, as an explanation, the historical roots of Polish anti-Semitism and the argument that Nazi policies simply rubbed off onto the Poles.

But Gross’s evidence, right down to an anti-Semitic revue that was staged in January 1947 near the largest Jewish .

But Gross’s evidence, right down to an anti-Semitic revue that was staged in January 1947 near the largest Jewish cemetery on the planet, Auschwitz (a local policeman had the starring role), overwhelms his theory. Such an enormous and varied inventory of inhumanity, one that included the cruelty of children too young to have felt guilt or remorse for anything, transcends any set of historical conditions. It is Jedwabne, not Jebwabne.

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Gross investigates the violence directed at Jews in Poland at the conclusion of World War II. For more than half a century, what happened to the Jewish Holocaust survivors has been cloaked in guilt and shame. Writing with passion, brilliance, and fierce clarity, Gross at last brings the truth to light.

After the publication of his book, historians started to look more closely at the history of the Poles under Hitler only to discover that Jedwabne was not an. .An Essay in Historical Interpretation.

After the publication of his book, historians started to look more closely at the history of the Poles under Hitler only to discover that Jedwabne was not an isolated case. There were many Jedwabnes where Poles killed their Jewish neighbors. And even though there was a short moment, when in 2001 then-president Aleksander Kwasniewski publicly apologized for Jedwabne, five years later the people of Jedwabne still choose to remember the Polish residents exiled to the Soviet Union instead.

Jan Gross does it again. Following Neighbors, a revisionist rendition of the Jedwabne massacre, he lays bare the truths about the last program which occurred on July 4, 1946 in Kielce, Poland. Anti-semitism endures well after the end of the war and the destruction of all but a small population of Polish Jews. Few writers have the courage of Prof. Gross who has endured himself the vilification of his work by many Polish citizens in denial of the truth. 7 people found this helpful.

in Poland after Auschwitz - An Essay in Historical Interpretation.

Fear : Anti-Semitism in Poland after Auschwitz - An Essay in Historical Interpretation. Poland suffered an exceedingly brutal Nazi occupation during the Second World War. Close to five million Poles were killed. Of these, more than half were Jews killed in the Holocaust. Ninety percent of the world's second largest Jewish community was annihilated.

Электронная книга "Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland After Auschwitz", Jan Gross. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Fear: Anti-Semitism in Poland After Auschwitz" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Poland suffered an exceedingly brutal Nazi occupation during the Second World War. Close to five million Poles were killed. Of these, more than half were Jews killed in the Holocaust. Ninety percent of the world's second largest Jewish community was annihilated. But despite the calamity shared by Poland's Jews and non-Jews, anti-Semitic violence did not stop in Poland with the end of the war. Jewish Holocaust survivors returning to their Polish hometowns after the war experienced widespread hostility, including murder, at the hands of their neighbors. The bloodiest peacetime pogrom in twentieth-century Europe took place in Kielce, Poland, a year after the war ended. Jan Gross's Fear is a detailed reconstruction of this pogrom and the Polish reactions to it that attempts to answer a perplexing question: How was anti-Semitism possible in Poland after the war?

Gross argues that postwar Polish anti-Semitism cannot be understood simply as a continuation of prewar attitudes. Rather, it developed in the context of the Holocaust and the Communist takeover: Anti-Semitism eventually became a common currency between the Communist regime and a society filled with people who had participated in the Nazi campaign of murder and plunder, people for whom Jewish survivors were a standing reproach. The Polish poet Czeslaw Milosz said that Poland's Communist rulers fulfilled the dream of Polish nationalists by bringing into existence an ethnically pure state.

For more than half a century, what happened to Jewish Holocaust survivors in Poland has been cloaked in guilt and shame. Writing with passion, brilliance, and fierce clarity, Gross at last brings the truth to light.

Comments: (7)
asAS
So after 3 million Polish Jews are murdered by the NAZIs a few return from the concentration camps only to be slaughtered by their Polish neighbors -- who don't want to return the property they stole from the Jews and are disappointed that the Germans did not finish the job that they started. One might think that after Auschwitz, Birkenau, and so many other death camps on Polish soil the Poles might have had some compassion for their Jewish neighbors but that is not the historical record -- which is centuries of antisemitism and greed. One might have hoped that the Church would have interceded but that is not what happened -- the Church did not want to get involved. Professor Gross is to be thanked for writing this book, which carefully weighs the historical evidence and shows the depravity that human beings are capable of. Quite understandable why the Polish government wants to silence this depraved chapter in human history by criminalizing open debate.
Burilar
Jan Gross does it again. Following Neighbors, a revisionist rendition of the Jedwabne massacre, he lays bare the truths about the last program which occurred on July 4, 1946 in Kielce, Poland. Anti-semitism endures well after the end of the war and the destruction of all but a small population of Polish Jews. Few writers have the courage of Prof. Gross who has endured himself the vilification of his work by many Polish citizens in denial of the truth.
olgasmile
Well researched and written. There was still so much anti-antisemitism in Poland after the world learned of the death camps. In part, the survivors in Poland wanted to keep everything that was taken from Polish Jews.
Ustamya
Very important read for anyone who wants to know the truth about post-Holocaust Poland.
Malak
There have been a number of reviews both accepting and dismissing of Mr. Gross' book, FEAR. Do beware these low-star reviews which, for the most part, are by revisionist Polish Nationalists who have an antisemitic agenda to deny Polish involvement and rewrite history. They want to be worse victims than the Jews they helped murder.. The author has thoroughly researched the incidents and typical daily life in Poland experienced by Polish Jews after the war (and centuries earlier). Murderous prejudice is all too evident in a country (Poland) where there is not a very real, effective, and enforced rule of law. We do honor to these victims, remembering them by reading and telling their story and standing firm in pointing the accusatory finger at their murderers.

It's been a long time since I've read FEAR. Now after reading it again, it is so violent, so gruesome, so heart-rending, frightening--one can only ask the question how could supposedly ordinary people commit mass murder? Because in these Polish minds, it was! justice, proven and sanctioned as evidenced by the militia, policemen, boy scouts, prison guards, who all joined in with the mob gathered around the building housing the Jews, all of whom participated in the slaughter of Polish Jews in Kielce.

If you want truth in history, in Poland after! WWII, read Mr. Gross very painful telling of how a mob of Polish citizens, police, militia and boy scouts murdered their fellow citizens who were Jewish and had managed to survive the Holocaust.
Paster
Husband lowed it
luisRED
My first reading of this book was in Polish. Was very impressed by the thorough research of documents, events and facts. Was angered by the response of Polish church to evidence presented . It is a must book in any library on the holocaust.
Readable but dispiriting history of the Jews of Poland as the few of them who returned to their hometown after the Holocaust only to be "run out of town" by their Polish neighbors.