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eBook Authority and the Sacred: Aspects of the Christianisation of the Roman World download

by Peter Robert Lamont Brown

eBook Authority and the Sacred: Aspects of the Christianisation of the Roman World download ISBN: 0521499046
Author: Peter Robert Lamont Brown
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (August 25, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 105
ePub: 1438 kb
Fb2: 1390 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: mobi azw mbr lit
Category: History
Subcategory: World

The Christianization of the Roman world lies at the root of modern Europe.

The Christianization of the Roman world lies at the root of modern Europe. Peter Brown's fascinating study examines the factors that proved decisive and the compromises that made the emergence of the Christian conception of existence possible: how the old gods of the Roman Empire could be reinterpreted as symbols to further the message of the Church. Peter Brown also shows how Christian holy men were less representative of a triumphant faith than negotiators of a working compromise between the new faith and traditional ways of dealing with the supernatural worlds.

Similar books and articles. The Sacred in the Visual Arts. Isabelle Sabau - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:239-246. Power-in- Use: Secular and Sacred Aspects. An Everlasting Antiquity: Aspects of Peter Brown’s "The World of Late Antiquity". Cody Franchetti - 2014 - Global Journal of HUMAN-SOCIAL SCIENCE: History Archaeology and Anthropology 14 (1):1-7. Authority, Legitimacy and Sovereignty: Religion and Politics in the Roman Empire Before Constantine. Robin W. Lovin - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (2):177-189. A. Basu - 2000 - Journal of Human Values 6 (2):165-174.

Authority & the Sacred book. Brown looks at the symbolic systems in use by the Roman elites, conceptions of authority, and the roles of Christian holy men, and challenges the neat and accepted historical narrative of Christianity triumphing over and absorbing a moribund paganism. Rather, he shows a late antique world in which Christians and pagans negotiated a compromise between the new faith This slim volume brings together three lectures given by Brown on the subject of the "Christianisation" of the later Roman Empire.

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You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser. Peter Brown, Authority and the Sacred: Aspects of the Christianization of the Roman World (Cambridge University Press 1995). AUTHORITY AND THE SACRED Aspects ofthe Christianisation ofthe Roman worl. d + PETER,�ROWN Princeton University CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

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Authority & the Sacred is a repackaging of three lectures Brown presented in Cambridge back in the early '90s. All take as their topic the Christianisation of the Roman world, and tweak common assumptions made about tolerance toward and by Early Christians

Authority & the Sacred is a repackaging of three lectures Brown presented in Cambridge back in the early '90s. All take as their topic the Christianisation of the Roman world, and tweak common assumptions made about tolerance toward and by Early Christians. The essays are lucid and well-organized, but they do presuppose a fair amount of knowledge of the period and its players, as well as a bit of Latin and French, which may leave the casual reader (that would be I) struggling a bit to follow Brown's arguments

The Christianisation of the Roman world lies at the root of modern Europe, yet at the time it was a tentative and piecemeal process.

The Christianisation of the Roman world lies at the root of modern Europe, yet at the time it was a tentative and piecemeal process. Peter Brown's fascinating study examines the factors which proved decisive and the compromises which made the emergence of the Christian 'thought world' possible: how the the old gods of the Roman Empire could be reinterpreted as symbols to further the message of the Church.

The title aptly summarizes the author’s intent; the three essays explore only selected aspects of the process of Christianization in the Roman world. Paganism had come to an end at Calvary; Christ resoundingly defeated the demons. This is a gem of a book.

This is a gem of a book.

The Christianisation of the Roman world lies at the root of modern Europe, yet at the time it was a tentative and piecemeal process. Peter Brown's study examines the factors which proved decisive and the compromises which made the emergence of the Christian 'thought world' possible. He shows how contemporary narratives wavered between declarations of definitive victory and a sombre sense of the strength of the pre-Christian past, reflecting the hopes and fears of different generations faced with different social and political situations. He examines the social factors which muted the sharp intolerance which pervades the contemporary literary evidence, and he shows how Christian holy men were less representatives of a triumphant and intransigent faith than negotiators, at ground level, of a working compromise between the new faith and traditional ways of dealing with the supernatural world.
Comments: (7)
Kulalbine
Peter Brown's "Authority and the Sacred: Aspects of the Christianization of the Roman World" is a work well-worth its weight in perspective, since it breaks with the customary norm of interpreting the rise and triumph of Christianity through a medium of objective analysis. Brown ignores the inevitable vicissitudes of recorded history and offers a much more personal, subjective, and systematic account of the triumph of Christianity. To Professor Brown, Christianity gradually emerged and ascended amongst a world deeply rooted in traditional Pagan "common sense" belief systems. This process involved a shift in how upper-class Roman society conducted religious and political institutions; these institutions were in turn viewed by the general public, and at last Christianity was accepted and validated by the consensus of both stratums of society. Brown concludes and confirms his view by pointing out the profound effect that the holy men of the fifth and sixth centuries had upon people of all walks of life. This, from Brown's perspective, proves that Christianity needed to have a firm hold upon the psyche of the late Roman world and not merely upon the social and cultural levels. In other words, Constantine's revolution was only half the story. This work is clear and concise, and definitely has something to offer to both scholars and general readers alike.
kewdiepie
Great book.
Slowly writer
fine writer...sees real deep into time
Bodwyn
Authority & the Sacred is a repackaging of three lectures Brown presented in Cambridge back in the early '90s. All take as their topic the Christianisation of the Roman world, and tweak common assumptions made about tolerance toward and by Early Christians. The essays are lucid and well-organized, but they do presuppose a fair amount of knowledge of the period and its players, as well as a bit of Latin and French, which may leave the casual reader (that would be I) struggling a bit to follow Brown's arguments. Not impenetrable by any means, but decidedly an academic work rather than a popular one, Authority is probably best enjoyed by those already versed in its topic.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
This is a tiny little book divided into three essays and is an easy read in an afternoon for those somewhat initiated in the subject. It is important to point out that these are academic articles, and this is not a general history of the period with a focus on Christianization. Those unacquainted with the basics of this period may find too many unfamiliar names being tossed around to get to the real meat of this book. The first essay "Christianization: Narratives and Process" discusses how Christianity was melded by and how it reshaped fundamental ideas of how the universe functioned, and how this would vary between the "Eusebeian" east and the "Augustinian" west during the medieval period. He explains how Christians understood paganism and authority, and how pagans reacted to the success of the Christians. The scope is wide, the writing is masterful, and Peter Brown's expertise on the subject ensures that this particular essay is an important one. The second essay deals with just how far intolerance can go, and he argues that the traditional explanation of a rather intolerant post-Constantinian empire is not entirely accurate. He also explores the question of just what intolerance was, and argues quite convincingly that the means of intolerance was the important factor. Paideia played a major role in this, and this entire chapter feels like a very succinct summary of Brown's Power & Persuasion Late Antiquity: Towards A Christian Empire. The final essay is an expansion on Brown's seminal "Rise and Function of the Holy Man in Antiquity" article published in 1971 in the Journal of Roman Studies. He comments on criticism of his earlier article and refines the points made by making some concise and important arguments on how the late antique holy men were viewed and how they related to paganism. I'm not totally sure how he arrives at the conclusion that Symeon Stylites was accepting the surrender of the pagan gods, but the salient points of the article remain clear enough, and it remains a fine addition to the original article and a good conclusion to this little book.

The one and only criticism I have with this book is its price. The content is excellent, although the central article is expounded at greater length in a book $10 cheaper than this one. For only some 80 pages of reading, this book costs as much as two average popular history books. Given its size, I'm not sure that this is entirely fair given the generally reasonable price for some of Brown's other works.
Froststalker
This is a gem of a book. Short enough to read in an afternoon, but so packed full of ideas and primary source material that you will return to it repeatedly in your research.

Chapter 1 details the "triumphalist" approach to understanding the suppossed triumph of Christianity ofver paganism, a la Eusebius, but that the defeat of Adrianople shook the beleif in an ordered and understandable "god on our side" worldview. According to Brown, Augustine had a more sober view of reality, which was pessimistic about "this age", and which eventually overtook the former idealism. Augustine laments the encroachment of pagan practices as converts streamed in, akin to Cato the Elder's lament about foreigners in Rome.

Chapter 2 explores the intorlerance for alternate theologies and beliefs in the Theodosian Age, a truly sad chapter in Christian history (IMHO). What is refreshing to me is how Brown points out that in the midst of anti-Semitism and anti-Jewish activites there was a greater than expected (or currently understood and taught) amount of civility and respect. Remember, keeping the empire together was their main priority. So it was the upper class, moreso than the church or state, setting the tone of practice.

Chapter 3 examines the idea of the holy, the saint. Reminescent of paganism, the holy man interceeded for all regardless of religion or creed. Such a man allowed the newly chrsitened, or reluctanly conjoled, to make a familiar trainsition into the new religion.