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eBook Rome 1300: On the Path of the Pilgrim download

by Johanna Zacharias,Herbert L. Kessler

eBook Rome 1300: On the Path of the Pilgrim download ISBN: 0300081537
Author: Johanna Zacharias,Herbert L. Kessler
Publisher: Yale University Press (April 1, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1843 kb
Fb2: 1462 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi lrf azw doc
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Herbert L. Kessler (Author), Johanna Zacharias (Author).

Herbert L. ISBN-13: 978-0300081534. Colleagues at Johns Hopkins University, Kessler and Zacharias have composed a book, focusing on some of the chief churches in Rome, that has a unique premise: accompanying a woman on her religious pilgrimage through Rome in August 1300, the year Pope Boniface VIII proclaimed the Church's first Year of Jubilee. The authors present scenes of still-standing church buildings and their interiors as they were in 1300, and they have reconstructed scenes of the apostolic basilicas (. St. Peter and St. Paul Outside the Walls), which predate the present churches. Kessler, Johanna Zacharias. Speculum 77 (4):1329-1330 (2002). Geschichte Als Nicht-Geschichte Unterschiede Und Zwischen Friedrich Kessler Und der Deutschen Rechtswissenschaft History as Non-History : Divergences and Time Lag Between Friedrich Kessler and German Jurisprudence. Christian Joerges - 1992 - European University Institute. GREENE, THEODORE, and Others, "Liberal Education Reexamined". Kessler Kessler - 1943 - Modern Schoolman 21:244. Tibetan Yoga and Secret Doctrines. W. Y. Evans-Wentz - 1968 - New York, Oxford University Press.

Herbert Leon Kessler (b, 1941) is an prominent American medieval art historian active in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. Rome 1300: On the Path of the Pilgrim (2000; with Johanna Zacharias). Spiritual Seeing: Picturing God’s Invisibility in Medieval Art (2000). Kessler was born in Chicago, Illinois and studied at the University of Chicago (. 1961) and Princeton University (. He studied under Kurt Weitzmann at Princeton, and collaborated with Weitzmann on a number of projects. Seeing Medieval Art (2004). Neither God nor Man. Texts, Pictures, and the Anxiety of Medieval Art (2007). This is only a partial list).

Colleagues at Johns Hopkins University, Kessler and Zacharias have composed a book, focusing on some of. .Johanna Zacharias is director of communications for the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins.

Colleagues at Johns Hopkins University, Kessler and Zacharias have composed a book, focusing on some of the chief churches in Rome, that has a unique premise: accompanying a woman on her religious. Tam incelemeyi okuyun. Rome 1300: On the Path of the Pilgrim.

Pope John Paul II declared the year 2000 a Jubilee year  . Rather than provide a description of the city as a whole, authors Herbert Kessler and Johanna Zacharias provide the reader with a framing device: What if you were a pilgrim visting Rome during the Jubilee year of 1300? And what if the pilgrim arrived on the eve of the Feast of the Assumption? What would she see? The pilgrim would have begun at the Lateran, seeing the Patriarchum and the Sancta Sanctorum.

Kessler, Herbert . 1941-; Zacharias, Johanna, 1942-.

Home KESSLER, Herbert L. & Johanna ZACHARIAS: Rome 1300. The path of the pilgrim. KESSLER, Herbert L. & Johanna ZACHARIAS: Published by New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2000. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

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By Herbert L. Kessler and Johanna Zacharias. New Haven and London: Yale University Press. Late in the year 1299 pilgrims imbued with expectations of plenary indulgences began to congregate in Rome

By Herbert L. Late in the year 1299 pilgrims imbued with expectations of plenary indulgences began to congregate in Rome. As the Church had never marked the advent of a new century with an indulgence, Boniface VIII had no provisions in place for granting one. However, as the new year wore on and the pilgrims' numbers continued to swell, on February 22, 130. ONTINUE READING.

This book combines history and art history in very readable form. It is through an imagined woman's eyes that the authors and the reader see and are affected by the religious sites and rituals of Rome 1300 (e.g., the night-long procession of the icon of Christ from the Lateran to join the icon of Mary at S. Maria Maggiore across the city). The purpose of the book is to present medieval Rome as a living environment, to show how the major churches and the sacred relics, frescoes, icons, and mosaics within them actually served in the Middle Ages to attract the faithful and to confirm and teach belief among the throngs of pilgrims who flocked to the eternal city. The authors not only look back at what pilgrims ventured to see in Rome during the first Jubilee but forward to the Holy Year of 2000, when an estimated 45 million Catholics will retrace the steps of their forebears in search of plenary absolution.
Comments: (2)
Ytli
Ever wonder what it was like to go on pilgrimage in the Middle Ages? Check out Rome 1300 for an inkling.

In the year MM, Pope John Paul II declared a Jubilee. Herbert Kessler describes the first millennial Jubilee, the year M, declared by Pope Boniface VIII. Follow in the footsteps of the 200,000 pilgrims who inundated Rome. See the sites and sights they saw, many of which are still extant, and view the artifacts, relics, churches, chapels, and other holy places that were their guarantee to salvation. Fantastic illustrations accompany the fascinating text.
NI_Rak
Excellent overview of Rome in the Middle Ages, told through the interseting literary construct of following a pilgrim on her route to the holy places during the first Jubilee. I am hardly an expert on Rome, let alone during this specific time period. However, Kessler's descriptions - especially of the architecture, but also of the life and times - were most informative. Too many sources treat the period between the collapse of the Empire and the beginning of the Renaissance as somehow an uninteresting period, best left glossed over. Kessler fills in the gaps.
My only complaint: the copious illustrations are all in black & white, which hardly do them justice.