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eBook Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church: Emperor Julian, Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Vision of Rome download

by Susanna Elm

eBook Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church: Emperor Julian, Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Vision of Rome download ISBN: 0520269306
Author: Susanna Elm
Publisher: University of California Press (April 10, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 576
ePub: 1402 kb
Fb2: 1444 kb
Rating: 4.5
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Category: History
Subcategory: World

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The influence of the legacy of the Cappadocian fathers concerns the challenge which diversity and plurality create in systematic theology

Elm, 2012) While Julian's restoration of 'Hellenism' as a state religion was short-lived, another 'religion' (Le Code Théodosien: Livre Xvi Livre Xvi, 2005;) Yet other laws present Judaism as a religio alongside Christianity. Various laws decree protection of synagogues, respect for the Sabbath (Jews may not be summoned to court on a Saturday), et.The influence of the legacy of the Cappadocian fathers concerns the challenge which diversity and plurality create in systematic theology. This legacy is explored by means of the 'lived experiences' of the life stories of the Cappadocians.

Home Browse Books Book details, Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church . Liberal Catholic Anglicanism Revived: Concelebration at All Saints' Church, Rome, 14 June 2012 By Bates, J. Barrington Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 81, No. 4, December 2012.

Home Browse Books Book details, Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church:. Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church: Emperor Julian, Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Vision of Rome. By Susanna Elm. No cover image. Seeking God: Julian of Norwich and Saint Benedict By Minore, Anna Magistra, Vol. 8, No. 2, Winter 2002.

Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor’s . A solid new monograph on Gregory of Nazianzus in dialogue with Emperor Julian "the Apostate.

Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor’s neo-Paganism, but rather to find their commo This groundbreaking study brings into dialogue for the first time the writings of Julian, the last non-Christian Roman Emperor, and his most outspoken critic, Bishop Gregory of Nazianzus, a central figure of Christianity. Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor’s neo-Paganism, but rather to find their common intellectual and social grounding.

You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. To browse Academia Berkeley 2012. Susanna Elm. Download with Google. edu and the wider internet faster and more securely, please take a few seconds to upgrade your browser. Sons of Hellenism, Fathers of the Church: Emperor Julian. Gregory of Nazianzus, and the Vision of Rome.

Susanna Elm delivers a simply amazing reading of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Emperor Julian through the lens of contemporary debates about the nature of Rome. On a scholarly level, Elm is breaking new ground, digging deep into the corpuses of these two great writers and setting them in the context of their educational background and the raging political debates that crossed Christian/Pagan lines in the fourth century. I left Julian, the beast threatening Gregory and his church from the outside, in early summer of 362 en route from Constantinople to Antioch.

Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor’s neo-Paganism, but rather to find their common intellectual and social grounding. Her insightful analysis, supplemented by her magisterial command of sources, demonstrates the ways in which both men were part of the same dialectical whole.

Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor's . Gregory formulated most of these concepts in Nazianzus, and they were in the first instance intended for a local audience. But Nazianzus was not an island.

Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor's neo-Paganism, but rather to find their common intellectual and social grounding.

By this time Emperor Julian had publicly declared himself in opposition to.Gregory established Eulalius as bishop of Nazianzus and then withdrew into the solitude of Arianzum.

By this time Emperor Julian had publicly declared himself in opposition to Christianity. 115 In response to the emperor's rejection of the Christian faith, Gregory composed his Invectives Against Julian between 362 and 363. Invectives asserts that Christianity will overcome imperfect rulers such as Julian through love and patience. By late 372 Gregory returned to Nazianzus to assist his dying father with the administration of his diocese. 199 This strained his relationship with Basil, who insisted that Gregory resume his post at Sasima.

This groundbreaking study brings into dialogue for the first time the writings of Julian, the last non-Christian Roman Emperor, and his most outspoken critic, Bishop Gregory of Nazianzus, a central figure of Christianity. Susanna Elm compares these two men not to draw out the obvious contrast between the Church and the Emperor’s neo-Paganism, but rather to find their common intellectual and social grounding. Her insightful analysis, supplemented by her magisterial command of sources, demonstrates the ways in which both men were part of the same dialectical whole. Elm recasts both Julian and Gregory as men entirely of their times, showing how the Roman Empire in fact provided Christianity with the ideological and social matrix without which its longevity and dynamism would have been inconceivable.
Comments: (2)
Xinetan
There is obviously a lot of scholarship in this volume, but also some jarring errors. For example, the author repeatedly describes bishops as being "ordained" whenever they are being moved from one see to another. Men were ordained as bishop only once (it is the sacrament that makes them bishop - and is generally called "consecration" rather than "ordination") and were "translated" from one see to another, or one could even say "transferred." But this sort of error is like calling a touchdown a homerun or confusing the Declaration of Independence with the Constitution. That is to say, if someone is a competent historian, writing in detail on a matter of ecclesiastical history, one would suppose that such common knowledge would not be lacking. This is not an esoteric point. I can only wonder at how much else in her research she has been deaf to. I assume this to be peer-reviewed work and am thus troubled about the academic establishment that has ceased to be familiar with such things.

Some are declaring this book a sea-change in the study of St. Gregory. It often ignores what he actually says and elevates the author's rhetorical analysis to the actual meaning. It is suspect.

I appreciated the collection of material, but will be drawing my own conclusions.
Agamaginn
Susanna Elm delivers a simply amazing reading of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Emperor Julian through the lens of contemporary debates about the nature of Rome. On a scholarly level, Elm is breaking new ground, digging deep into the corpuses of these two great writers and setting them in the context of their educational background and the raging political debates that crossed Christian/Pagan lines in the fourth century. After reading this, you realize what a crisis moment Julian's departure from the Constantinian religious platform was, how startled Christian elites were, and how deliberately Gregory opposed the change. You will never think about Gregory the same way again!

A must-read for the scholar of Gregory, Julian, or the World of Late Antiquity. I'd argue this would be hard for the casual reader - certainly not an introduction to the period or to Gregory: a background in classical philosophy, Late Antiquity, and early Christianity is somewhat assumed and would certainly be helpful. Like many good scholars, Elm will give you the original French, German, Italian, Latin, and Greek without translation, so either be ready to suppress your curiosity or have a dictionary handy. The historical chapters read fairly quickly, but Elm is precise in her readings of the primary texts, and this is not skimmable. At almost 500 pages, this is an investment. Worth your time if you're interested in the period or in religion, politics, and social change.

Alternately, if you're interested in an introduction to Nicene Christianity, try "Nicaea and its Legacy" by Lewis Ayres. A great intro to Gregory is John McGuckin's recent biography, "St. Gregory of Nazianzus: An Intellectual Biography." For a good collection of Gregory's poems and orations, I recommend Brian Daley's translations in the Early Church Fathers series.

Elm's work is a particularly healthy treatment of Gregory, who, as one of early Christianity's theologians par excellence, is rarely studied for legal or political insight. I wrote my undergraduate thesis on Gregory, and he is typically understood as a theologian/poet, who'd rather be studying, far behind his friend Basil in statesmanship. Elm slices through decades of secondary scholarship on Gregory to argue forcefully that the Pagan context reveals Gregory to be a passionate political philosopher and Christian who plied his rhetorical prowess to advance a particular vision of Rome over and against other leading contenders.

At stake are key questions which fascinated Plato and Aristotle and continued to be paramount for Greco-Roman society: What is the proper understanding of the gods' will? What policies will cause the gods to bless the state? What is the proper philosophical background for the ideal leader? Elm focuses particularly on Gregory's second, fourth, and fifth orations to answer these questions, providing detailed contextual readings of his works and diving into his "Theological Orations," poems, and letters for further supporting material.

To understand Western history, you have to understand the momentous changes wrought when Christianity became the religion of the Roman empire. Gregory did not cause those changes, but he and Julian stand at a moment when it is becoming clear how vital the redefinitions are. The war of words Gregory waged with Julian stands at a crossroads in history, and Elm is an excellent guide.