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eBook 1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West download

by Roger Crowley

eBook 1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West download ISBN: 1401301916
Author: Roger Crowley
Publisher: Hachette Books; First Edition first Printing edition (August 10, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1336 kb
Fb2: 1221 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lrf mbr txt lit
Category: History
Subcategory: World

The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land. After Constantinople fell, it rejuvenated Islam to continue its jihad into the West. And the West was left to consider how its infighting and disunity helped lead to the fall of their great city

The Crusades: The Authoritative History of the War for the Holy Land. And the West was left to consider how its infighting and disunity helped lead to the fall of their great city. 17 people found this helpful.

The maps of the area and of Constantinople 1453 were very useful and helped me visualize

The maps of the area and of Constantinople 1453 were very useful and helped me visualize. From this book I learned many things about this momentous event and recommend it to anyone interested in world history. This is the third book of popular history of Crowley's I have read and it did not disappoint.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-287) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. 283-287) and index.

A gripping exploration of the fall of Constantinople and its connection to the world we live in today. The fall of Constantinople in 1453 signaled a shift in history and the end of the Byzantium Empire

A gripping exploration of the fall of Constantinople and its connection to the world we live in today. The fall of Constantinople in 1453 signaled a shift in history and the end of the Byzantium Empire.

Электронная книга "1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West", Roger Crowley

Электронная книга "1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West", Roger Crowley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the West" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

When Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453, a remarkable era in world .

When Constantinople fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453, a remarkable era in world history ended. 64 people like this topic.

A gripping exploration of the fall of Constantinople and its connection to the world we live in today.The fall of Constantinople in 1453 signaled a shift in history and the end of the Byzantium Empire. Roger Crowley's readable and comprehensive account of the battle between Mehmet II, sultan of the Ottoman Empire, and Constantine XI, the 57th emperor of Byzantium, illuminates the period in history that was a precursor to the current conflict between the West and the Middle East.
Comments: (7)
Melipra
While reading this book, you are not on your seat holding a book, you are living the events you are among the characters, I do not know what name to give this style but it is amazing!
The moment I started reading this book I was its prisoner, I could not put it down, for three consecutive hours I was reading until I fell asleep. Considering it is a history book full of detailed events, it is never boring. I was eager to see if when I continued reading the next day, if it will be also as exciting, it was till the end.
You will live the events of those days, the Ottoman art of war compared to the Europeans, the manufacturing of cannons, the logistics, army composition, new warfare guns and first use of Cannon battery formations for the first time in history, and their effect in the thousand years old walls of Constantinople, this vivid city that was in decline and disintegration which led to its defeat.
The book is so eventful that it is impossible to put down!
Ann
So often it's hard, especially in the time period in question and when dealing with conflicts involving major world religions, to find a book that is completely unbiased in it's reporting of the subject matter. This book and this author are the exception to that rule. That to begin with was what I enjoyed about this book. Mr. Crowley's position on the subject at hand is that of objective reporter of historical events. There is no personal or religious/Western bias of any kind (Not that I know anything of his personal beliefs) in this book or any sense that Mr. Crowley belongs to a "side" in the subject matter.

As for the subject matter itself, the book starts as a general overview of the emergence of Islam, it's conquest of the Arab world and it's previous conflicts with the Byzantines. It then generally covers the Byzantines history in the area over the previous 400 years and the way thier policies and mutual interactions led up the events to be covered.

The bulk of the book is a straight forward military history of the battle and the seige, covering historical documents as well as personal accounts of the battle from individuals who fought it. It covers the blood and guts details that you would expect to find in a medieval battle, detailing atrocieties committed with no attempt to whitewash or excuse, but also no attempt to judge from a modern perspective. All in all, one of the most enjoying and easy to read books I've read in some time.
Kizshura
As somebody who enjoys reading about this era and ottoman history in particular this book was a godsend. Mr Crowley has such a massive talent for writing in way that is a pleasure to read but also very scholarly. I liked how Crowley tried to be as objective as possible and not take sides during the siege. He paints the whole picture showing the good and bad on both sides. This was one of the most important moments in all of history and I couldn't think of somebody better to write about it.
Tujar
Absolutely riveting story of the conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror. Crowley explains the dispute between the churches in Rome and Constantinople, the influence of trade and money (powerhouse Venice's decision not to intervene on behalf of Byzantium after hints from Sultan Mehmed that they would not lose their enclave in the new Istanbul), the genius of Mehmed in organizing his logistics and lines of communication prior to the invasion, and the touch-and-go campaign that saw morale changing on both sides on a daily basis.

A must-read book.
santa
Crowley's book is fascinating, gripping, suspenseful, informative, cleanly written, and well-balanced. That is, he depicts the lead up to and long siege and taking of Constantinople by the Ottomans so that even if you know what finally happened in 1453 to the city and the Eastern Roman Empire etc., you'll find it difficult to stop reading and wanting to find out what will happen to the various individual key players in the story. Crowley covers much of the ground that other history books have covered, like Gibbon, but he also adds much from the Ottoman point of view (even though, as he points out, there are surprisingly few documents from Ottoman eye witnesses of the siege, so that the whole thing is an exception in being mostly history being written by the losers). He frankly points out atrocities and heroics by both sides, interestingly explores obscure points like just how and when Mehmet got all those Ottoman ships over the mountain, and convincingly communicates just how contingent the Ottoman victory was, how close the Byzantines came to winning the siege (even though they probably would have lost the next siege). Crowley also interestingly points out how mixed the two mega cultures were, with half-Serbian rulers on either side, etc., and how the rivalries and squabbling of the defenders (Genovese vs. Venetians, Italians vs. Greeks, strict Orthodox believers vs. Catholic appeasers, etc.) harmed their cause. His account of the manufacture, transportation, firing, and effect of the gargantuan Ottoman cannons is compelling, too. I also like how Crowley weaves together various testimonies of the events, synthesizing them or choosing from among them to come up with what seem to be the most reasonable takes on the history. And he works in some great, cool epigraphs to lead into each chapter. Finally, I read the kindle version and found no typos, though of course the pictures and maps and such didn't look so good on my device, which can't be helped with an e-book. In short, I recommend 1453 to any readers interested in the Byzantine Empire, Ottoman Empire, clash of Islamic and Christian cultures, or compelling history books of heroic and horrible battles.