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eBook Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge (Oxford Series on History and Archives) download

by Sonja Luehrmann

eBook Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge (Oxford Series on History and Archives) download ISBN: 0199943621
Author: Sonja Luehrmann
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 17, 2015)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1667 kb
Fb2: 1331 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: History
Subcategory: World

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. This book is addressed to historians of the Soviet Union and specialists in religious studies, and could be possibly used by students of history in general to learn how to use the archives in their scholarship.

July 2018 · The Journal of Ecclesiastical History. Religion in secular archives. Soviet atheism and historical knowledge. 978 0 19 994362 3 - Volume 69 Issue 3 - Felix Corley. Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge.

Sonja Luehrmann received her P. Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge (New York: Oxford University Press, 2015). from the Program in Anthropology and History at the University of Michigan in 2009. She has published two books on Soviet atheism and its effects on post-Soviet religion and historical memory: Secularism Soviet Style: Teaching Atheism and Religion in a Volga Republic (Indiana, 2011) and Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge (Oxford, 2015).

Oxford series on history and archives. General Note: Includes bibliographical references

Oxford series on history and archives. General Note: Includes bibliographical references. Recommend this journal.

Religion in Secular Archives. Oxford Series on History and Archives. Examines previously unpublished sources on Soviet anti-religious policy in the 1950s-70s. Argues that atheists can contribute important perspectives to our understanding of religion. Considers how Soviet policy affected a range of religious groups in the multi-ethnic Soviet Union, rather than focusing on only one group.

Russian History Books. Oxford University Press, USA. Book Format. Religion in Secular Archives : Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Heather J. Coleman, "Sonja Luehrmann, Religion in Secular Archives: Soviet Atheism and Historical Knowledge," The Journal of Modern History 89, no. 2 (June 2017): 488-490.

Making religion acceptable in communist romania and the soviet union, 1943-1989. Memories for a Blessing Jewish Mourning Rituals and Commemorative Practices in Postwar Belarus and Ukraine, 1944-1991.

Sonja Luehrmann explores the Soviet atheist effort to build a society without gods or spirits and its afterlife in post-Soviet religious revival

Sonja Luehrmann explores the Soviet atheist effort to build a society without gods or spirits and its afterlife in post-Soviet religious revival.

What can atheists tell us about religious life? Russian archives contain a wealth of information on religiosity during the Soviet era, but most of it is written from the hostile perspective of officials and scholars charged with promoting atheism. Based on archival research in locations as diverse as the multi-religious Volga region, Moscow, and Texas, Sonja Luehrmann argues that we can learn a great deal about Soviet religiosity when we focus not just on what documents say but also on what they did. Especially during the post-war decades (1950s-1970s), the puzzle of religious persistence under socialism challenged atheists to develop new approaches to studying and theorizing religion while also trying to control it. Taking into account the logic of filing systems as well as the content of documents, the book shows how documentary action made religious believers firmly a part of Soviet society while simultaneously casting them as ideologically alien. When juxtaposed with oral, printed, and samizdat sources, the records of institutions such as the Council of Religious Affairs and the Communist Party take on a dialogical quality. In distanced and carefully circumscribed form, they preserve traces of encounters with religious believers. By contrast, collections compiled by western supporters during the Cold War sometimes lack this ideological friction, recruiting Soviet believers into a deceptively simple binary of religion versus communism. Through careful readings and comparisons of different documentary genres and depositories, this book opens up a difficult set of sources to students of religion and secularism.