carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory

eBook Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory download

by Janet Jacobs

eBook Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory download ISBN: 1848851022
Author: Janet Jacobs
Publisher: I.B.Tauris (September 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1921 kb
Fb2: 1590 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: docx mbr doc mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Janet Liebman Jacobs (born 1948) is an American sociologist specializing in gender and religion.

Janet Liebman Jacobs (born 1948) is an American sociologist specializing in gender and religion.

Janet Jacobs is Professor of Sociology and Women and Gender Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. Her publications include Victimized Daughters: Incest and the Development of the Female Self (1994), and Hidden Heritage: The Legacy of the Crypto-Jews (2002), for which she won the Distinguished Book Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion.

Did Gender Matter during the Holocaust? January 2019 · Jewish Social Studies History Culture and Society. Double Jeopardy: Gender and the Holocaust: by Judith Tydor Baumel, 292 pages January 2001 · Women s Studies International Forum.

Jacobs's book investigates how, at a range of sites in Germany and .

Jacobs's book investigates how, at a range of sites in Germany and eastern Europe as well as the United States and Australia, gendered visual narratives contribute to traumatic collective memories of violence and genocide.

Memorializing the Holocaust book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Janet Jacobs offers new understandings of this crucial issue in her examination of the representation of gender in the memorial culture of holocaust monuments and museums. How do collective memories of histories of violence and trauma in war and genocide come to be created?

Janet Jacobs is Professor of Sociology and Women and Gender Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder. Her publications include 'Victimized Daughters: Incest and the Development of the Female Self' (1994), and 'Hidden Heritage: The Legacy of the Crypto-Jews' (2002), for which she won the Distinguished Book Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion.

She is the author of numerous books and journal articles, including Hidden Heritage: The Legacy of the Crypto-Jews and Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. The Holocaust Across Generations.

Jacobs, Janet Liebman. These additional online resources from the . Holocaust Encyclopedia. London : I. B. Tauris, 2010 Includes bibliographical references and index. The Holocaust Encyclopedia provides an overview of the Holocaust using text, photographs, maps, artifacts, and personal histories. Holocaust Survivors and Victims Resource Center.

London: Tauris, 2010. Published: 1 June 2011. by University of Chicago Press. in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Volume 36, pp 1020-1022; doi:10. Keywords: collective memory, gender, Holocaust, memorializing, genocide, Janet Jacobs, Tauris, London.

How do collective memories of histories of violence and trauma in war and genocide come to be created? Janet Jacobs offers new understandings of this crucial issue in her examination of the representation of gender in the memorial culture of Holocaust monuments and museums, from synagogue memorials and other historical places of Jewish life, to the geographies of Auschwitz, Majdanek and Ravensbruck.

Jacobs travelled to Holocaust sites across Europe to explore representations of women. She reveals how these memorial cultures construct masculinity and femininity, as well as the Holocaust's effect on stereotyping on grounds of race or gender. She also uncovers the wider ways in which images of violence against women have become universal symbols of mass trauma and genocide. This feminist analysis of Holocaust memorialization brings together gender and collective memory with the geographies of genocide to fill a significant gap in our understanding of genocide and national remembrance.