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eBook Byzantine Magic (Dumbarton Oaks Other Titles in Byzantine Studies) download

by Henry Maguire,Matthew W. Dickie,James Russell,Alexander Kazhdan,James Duffy,Marie Theres Fogen,Richard P. H. Greenfield,Robert Mathiesen

eBook Byzantine Magic (Dumbarton Oaks Other Titles in Byzantine Studies) download ISBN: 0884023400
Author: Henry Maguire,Matthew W. Dickie,James Russell,Alexander Kazhdan,James Duffy,Marie Theres Fogen,Richard P. H. Greenfield,Robert Mathiesen
Publisher: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection (March 31, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1905 kb
Fb2: 1546 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi docx lit txt
Category: History
Subcategory: World

explores the parameters and significance of magic in Byzantine society. papers on Byzantine magic from a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks in 1993.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Written by specialists in several disciplines, this volume explores the parameters and significance of magic in Byzantine society. It is a collection of conference papers on Byzantine magic from a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks in 1993. If you are looking for a general book on Byzantine magic, this is not the place to go. Being academic papers, these are mostly specialist works.

By Henry Maguire, Matthew W. Dickie, James Russell, Alexander Kazhdan, James Duffy, Marie Theres Fogen, Richard P. H. Greenfield, Robert Mathiesen. Written by way of experts in different disciplines, this quantity explores the parameters and value of magic in Byzantine society, from the fourth century to after the empire's fall. The authors show the scope, the kinds, and the functioning of magic in Byzantine society, throwing mild on a hitherto particularly little-known point of Byzantine tradition, and, whilst, increasing upon the modern debates relating magic and its roles in pre-modern societies.

ISBN 13: 9780884022305. Henry Maguire is a former Director of Byzantine Studies at Dumbarton Oaks and Professor of Art History at Johns Hopkins University.

Written by specialists in several disciplines, this volume explores the parameters and significance of magic in Byzantine society, from the fourth century to after the empire's fall. The authors reveal the scope, the forms, and the functioning of magic in Byzantine society, throwing light on a hitherto relatively little-known aspect of Byzantine culture, and, at the same time, expanding upon the contemporary debates concerning magic and its roles in pre-modern societies

Byzantine Magic book. Consider It: Matthew Dickie, Richard . Eh: James Russell, Henry Maguire.

Byzantine Magic book. Written by specialists in several disciplines, this volume explores. Lists with This Book. Mar 03, 2016 Anatolikon rated it really liked it. First off, it is important to state that this is not really a book.

Written by specialists in several disciplines, this volume explores the parameters and significance of magic in Byzantine society, from the fourth century to after the empire's fall. The authors address a wide variety of questions, some of which are common to all historical research into magic, and some of which are peculiar to the Byzantine context.

The authors reveal the scope, the forms, and the functioning of magic in Byzantine society, throwing light on a hitherto relatively little-known aspect of Byzantine culture, and, at the same time, expanding upon the contemporary debates concerning magic and its roles in pre-modern societies.

Comments: (2)
Kelenn
This is really one of the only books on Byzantine magic around. It is a collection of scholarly papers and covers a pretty wide range of topics. At times it does not really distinguish very well between charlatan-style street magic and true occult practices, but apparently the Byzantines sometimes had trouble with that distinction too. Also - spoiler alert - with the exception of a few interesting characteristics, Byzantine magic is pretty similar to magic throughout the rest of the world/history. Still, I learned a lot and had a lot of fun reading it.
Zadora
First off, it is important to state that this is not really a book. It is a collection of conference papers on Byzantine magic from a symposium at Dumbarton Oaks in 1993. If you are looking for a general book on Byzantine magic, this is not the place to go. Being academic papers, these are mostly specialist works. Since they are varied, I am going to review each of them individually, because it is impossible to give a review of the book as a whole when it is really just a collection of conference papers.

The first paper is Matthew Dickie's 'The Church Fathers and the Evil Eye'. It outlines the reactions of the various church fathers to the power of the evil eye. Although it may not be able to be called "Byzantine", this paper presents some important insights into the early church, its leaders, and the relationship between paganism and Christianity, as well as the attitude of elites over time towards magic.

The second paper is James Russell's 'The Archaeological Context of Magic in the Early Byzantine Period'. Noting that most of what we know about late Roman magic is from Egypt, he asks the question regarding how representative that is of the entire Roman and Byzantine worlds. The answer is explored through archaeology, notably the site at Anemurion. This article also includes a large section of plates. Unfortunately, the question is never answered, but the results at Anemurion are very interesting nonetheless.

The third article is Henry Maguire's 'Magic and the Christian Image', a paper largely concerned with the magical connotations of figures and symbols on textiles, and how they changed over time especially in regard to iconoclasm. This article is one of the best in the volume, and also has a large selection of plates.

The fourth article is Alexander Kazhdan's 'Holy and Unholy Miracle Workers'. It is a little disappointing, especially since it is from such a renowned name in the field. He asks the question how one can tell the difference between holy and unholy miracles, and determines that it is ultimately impossible. However, this article does lay out some groundwork for further study.

John Duffy wrote the next article on the attitudes of two Byzantine intellectuals towards magic: Michael Psellos and Michael Italikos. It is a fascinating, if somewhat unfinished article that tries to explore what they thought of it. Considering that we have personal letters of both men, we can view their ideas within that context, as well as the more literary, in the case of Psellos. The article also includes a discussion on the empress Zoe (in book 6, when she was married to Constantine IX) and her ideas on magic, as related by Psellos. It feels unfinished, but it goes a long way towards understanding Hellenism and literary motif in regards to magic in the 11th and 12th centuries.

The sixth article is by Marie Theres Fogen and supposedly on Balsamon and the relation of Roman secular law and Byzantine canon law in regard to magic. The historiographical context is badly lacking here, and it is really rather difficult to determine exactly what she is getting at, and how Balsamon plays into this. This article fails to tell us anything about Balsamon, secular law or canon law, and was a rather unnecessary addition to this volume

There are two more articles, neither of which I read due to a lack of interest in the respective periods. Greenfield writes on Palaiologan magic, and Mathiesen writes on the written tradition of magic in Slavic lands.

In sum, this is a good, affordable package of conference papers. Unfortunately, the field is rather undeveloped, and some of these papers reflect that, but on a whole they are quite good. Four stars on account of Fogen and Kazhdan's worthless and lacklustre articles, respectively.