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eBook Ignatius and Concord: The Background and Use of the Language of Concord in the Letters of Ignatius of Antioch (Patristic Studies) download

by John-Paul Lotz

eBook Ignatius and Concord: The Background and Use of the Language of Concord in the Letters of Ignatius of Antioch (Patristic Studies) download ISBN: 0820486981
Author: John-Paul Lotz
Publisher: Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers (March 30, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 247
ePub: 1808 kb
Fb2: 1619 kb
Rating: 4.7
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Category: History
Subcategory: World

John-Paul Lotz (2007). a b c Gambetti, Sandra, The Alexandrian Riots of 38 . and the Persecution of the Jews: A Historical Reconstruction, pages 11-12

John-Paul Lotz (2007). p. 98. ISBN 9780820486987. and the Persecution of the Jews: A Historical Reconstruction, pages 11-12. The Alexandrian Riot in 38 CE, p139-145, in The Exodus Story in the Wisdom of Solomon: A Study in Biblical Interpretation, by Samuel Cheon. Introduction to Philonis Alexandrini Legatio Ad Gaium, 1961, Brill.

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The study of Ignatius of Antioch has for several centuries been chiefly concerned with two enigmas relating to the corpus of literature associated with him: authorship and date. This book goes beyond these issues in that it evaluates the meaning and purpose of these letters on their own terms in an attempt to better understand the background and the exigencies that helped produce them. By evaluating how homonoia was used in a variety of contexts and comparing these uses with those in Ignatius of Antioch, this book provides a fresh approach to his letters.

W. BARNARD Ignatius of Antioch is one of the key figures of the Church of the early second century. According to this school there stands in the background of Ignatius' thought, as behind all early Christian literature, an Iranian-Gnostic myth of a descending and ascending redeemer which was widely known in the ancient world and had many ramifications in different systems. According to Schlier this form of Gnosticism was such a strong influence on Ignatius that it fully explains his theology. Bartsch, on the other hand, holds that Gnostic influence penetrated Ignatius' thought mainly in his idea of the Unity of God.

To this end, Ignatius specifically promotes and defends in the Letter to the Ephesians a strict-though-kind hierarchical structure .

To this end, Ignatius specifically promotes and defends in the Letter to the Ephesians a strict-though-kind hierarchical structure within the church. Concerning the infrastructure of the church, Ignatius clearly favors a situation wherein the bishop holds the highest earthly rank of authority in the community, followed by the presbyters or deacons, and then lastly, the congregation members. Ignatius of Antioch’s charge for the early Christian church was to be a productive and protective one. For this important Apostolic Father, the ultimate purpose of the church was to reach the world for Christ.

Saint Ignatius of Antioch, bishop of Antioch, known mainly from seven highly regarded letters that he wrote . Ignatius represented the Christian religion in transition from its Jewish origins to its assimilation in the Greco-Roman world

Saint Ignatius of Antioch, bishop of Antioch, known mainly from seven highly regarded letters that he wrote during a trip to Rome, as a prisoner condemned to be executed for his beliefs. The letters have often been cited as a source of knowledge of the Christian church at the beginning of the 2nd century. Ignatius represented the Christian religion in transition from its Jewish origins to its assimilation in the Greco-Roman world. He laid the foundation for dogmas that would be formulated in succeeding generations.

The Ignatian Adventure: Experiencing the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius in Daily Life. 01. The Epistles of St. Clement of Rome and St. Ignatius of Antioch (Ancient Christian Writers). Four Witnesses: The Early Church in Her Own Words

The study of Ignatius of Antioch has for several centuries been chiefly concerned with two enigmas relating to the corpus of literature associated with him: authorship and date. ISBN13:9780820486987.

The & certain’ evaluation is indicated in Barnett’s book by the letter symbol &

As one scholar has recently and rightly affirmed, they are the ‘oldest written testimonies of Christianity’. 1 The New Testament contains thirteen letters that bear his name. It is also clear from the New Testament that this is not the extent of his output. The & certain’ evaluation is indicated in Barnett’s book by the letter symbol &.Passages from Paul cited with a & degree of probability’ receive the symbol & denotes passages cited with a & degree of probability’.

The study of Ignatius of Antioch has for several centuries been chiefly concerned with two enigmas relating to the corpus of literature associated with him: authorship and date. This book goes beyond these issues in that it evaluates the meaning and purpose of these letters on their own terms in an attempt to better understand the background and the exigencies that helped produce them. By evaluating how homonoia was used in a variety of contexts and comparing these uses with those in Ignatius of Antioch, this book provides a fresh approach to his letters. Broken by the discord in his own church and shamed with a difficult journey to an ignominious death, Ignatius sought to admonish the church members with whom he had contact – almost as if it were a last testament – to avoid schism by staying united and by submitting to the bishop, presbyters, and deacons appointed over them. These letters were written out of the context of Ignatius’ experiences of discord. Thus, concord, unity, and submission to the leaders were such overriding concerns for him as he made his way across the empire to Rome, where he died as a martyr.