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by John Julius Norwich

eBook Absolute Monarchs: A History of the Papacy download ISBN: 0812978846
Author: John Julius Norwich
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (May 15, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 544
ePub: 1463 kb
Fb2: 1129 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mobi rtf azw mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: World

John Julius Norwich was the author of more than twenty books, including the New York Times bestseller Absolute Monarchs. Norwich has written the most encyclopedic history of Europe & the Papacy I've ever read, covering in detail from Peter to Benedict.

John Julius Norwich was the author of more than twenty books, including the New York Times bestseller Absolute Monarchs. He began his career in the British foreign service, but resigned his diplomatic post to become a writer. He was a chairman of the Venice in Peril Fund and the honorary chairman of the World Monuments Fund. I wished it had included the new Pope. The Palace intigues of European royalty, the wars, social upheavals, crimes, passions, stupidity, brilliance; it's all there.

The story John Julius Norwich weaves is certainly an interesting one and sees many well known historical characters in. .This broad chronological history of the Papacy seemed to go on forever and, to be honest, I didn't get through the whole thing.

The story John Julius Norwich weaves is certainly an interesting one and sees many well known historical characters in attendance, if only fleetingly. And fleetingly is where I struggled with this book. The sheer number of popes over such a long period means that many come and go in the space of one or two sentences. I bailed around 1860 or so, which means that I did manage to consume about 1800 years of spastic politics and theological wtfery.

John Julius Norwich’s popular history of the papacy finds that the truly great popes were outnumbered by the corrupt . Continue reading the main story.

John Julius Norwich’s popular history of the papacy finds that the truly great popes were outnumbered by the corrupt, the inept, the venal, the lecherous and the mediocre. John Julius Norwich makes a point of saying in the introduction to his history of the popes that he is no scholar and that he is an agnostic Protestant.

In Absolute Monarchs, John Julius Norwich captures nearly two thousand years of inspiration and devotion, intrigue and scandal. The men (and maybe one woman) who have held this position of infallible power over millions have ranged from heroes to rogues, admirably wise to utterly decadent. Absolute Monarchs brilliantly portrays such reformers as Pope Paul III, the greatest pontiff of the sixteenth century, who reinterpreted the Church's teaching and discipline, and John XXIII, who in five short years starting in 1958 opened the church to the the twentieth century, instituting reforms that led to Vatican II.

InAbsolute Monarchs, John Julius Norwich captures nearly two thousandyears of inspiration and devotion .

InAbsolute Monarchs, John Julius Norwich captures nearly two thousandyears of inspiration and devotion, intrigue and scandal. The men (andmaybe one woman) who have held this position of infallible power overmillions have ranged from heroes to rogues, admirably wise to utterlydecadent. Absolute Monarchs brilliantly portrays reformers such as Pope Paul III, thegreatest pontiff of the sixteenth century, who reinterpreted the Church’steaching and discipline, and John XXIII, who in five short years starting in1958 opened up the church to the twentieth century, instituting reformsthat led to Vatican II.

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Absolute Monarchs - John Julius Norwich. A history of the Papacy is not an easy chore as the institution has been in existence in one form or another for 2000 years, but author Julius Norwich manages to do so in a coherent and entertaining fashion. The first 1000 years of the Papacy focused on getting the church established, its rivalry with the Eastern Orthodox Church and squabbles over arcane issues of doctrine that no one would care about today, but which often led to warfare between rival factions in the church.

Epic and compelling, Absolute Monarchs is an enthralling history from an enchanting and satisfying . John Julius Norwich was the author of more than twenty books, including the New York Times bestseller Absolute Monarchs

Epic and compelling, Absolute Monarchs is an enthralling history from an enchanting and satisfying raconteur (The Washington Post). ABSOLUTE MONARCHS: A History of the Papacy. John Julius Norwich was the author of more than twenty books, including the New York Times bestseller Absolute Monarchs. John Julius Norwich died in 2018. Bibliographic information.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER   In a chronicle that captures nearly two thousand years of inspiration and intrigue, John Julius Norwich recounts in riveting detail the histories of the most significant popes and what they meant politically, culturally, and socially to Rome and to the world. Norwich presents such popes as Innocent I, who in the fifth century successfully negotiated with Alaric the Goth, an invader civil authorities could not defeat; Leo I, who two decades later tamed (and perhaps paid off) Attila the Hun; the infamous “pornocracy”—the five libertines who were descendants or lovers of Marozia, debauched daughter of one of Rome’s most powerful families; Pope Paul III, “the greatest pontiff of the sixteenth century,” who reinterpreted the Church’s teaching and discipline; John XXIII, who in five short years starting in 1958 instituted reforms that led to Vatican II; and Benedict XVI, who is coping with today’s global priest sex scandal. Epic and compelling, Absolute Monarchs is an enthralling history from “an enchanting and satisfying raconteur” (The Washington Post).

Comments: (7)
Erthai
This book is a long slog through papal history. The author seems to have been aware of that length and chose to parse down the rich detail that would have made the length more bearable. The book does do a good job of showing some of the historical context in which the various papal actions were framed, but there is so much more that could have been accomplished with the material. In the end, this book is more like a general overview of papal history than a truly detailed study.
Querlaca
Norwich has written the most encyclopedic history of Europe & the Papacy I've ever read, covering in detail from Peter to Benedict. I wished it had included the new Pope. The Palace intigues of European royalty, the wars, social upheavals, crimes, passions, stupidity, brilliance; it's all there. The book is LONG, but covering 2100 years does require a few more pages than the history of England. Well done,
Gaudiker
This book took me nearly two months to read (with frequent breaks); not because it was hard to read, but because of how dense it was, covering nearly 2000 years of history in under 500 pages. It's a decent overview, though, and a great starting point for future research (though it helps to have a good idea of the broad shape of European/Christian history--the author has a high opinion of his reader's knowledge).
great ant
I understand Mr. Norwich is entitled to his biases, but that is the only complaint I have about the book. His history of the Papacy is informative, at times fascinating, and always readable. I recommend it.
Kirinaya
The first few centuries of the church makes you wonder how it survived. There were more Popes murdered than lived a natural life. These were the people who made the early pronouncments on the meaning of the bible?
Ieregr
This book was simultaneously fascinating and boring. There was a lot of interesting stuff in it, things I didn't know and didn't expect from the papacy. They were sprinkled in just frequently enough to keep me going. Three popes at one time? Who knew? Popes who actually lead armies into battle? Who knew that? Popes who apparently didn't believe in Christianity? Popes who were homosexual? Orgies with the cardinals? Well, that's all in there. But the book is also cursed with the scourges of history: dates, places and names. They all sound alike after a while. The places are frequently no longer in existence and it was hard for me to imagine where they were or what they were like. And the names, well let's just say that popes tend to have the same name. A lot. A whole lot. Who can remember the difference between Pope Paul the XIX and Pope Paul the XXI? (I'm not sure those are real popes, but you get the picture.)

The book is certainly worth reading although I don't know how anyone could take the Roman Catholic Church seriously afterward.
Inth
Good historical reading...
Very good read. Informative but never dry or boring. The author writes in a very readable, entertaining style that makes the book fun to read as well as educational. Highly recommended.