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by Martin E. Marty

eBook Pilgrims in Their Own Land: 500 Years of Religion in America download ISBN: 0140082689
Author: Martin E. Marty
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (August 6, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 512
ePub: 1435 kb
Fb2: 1861 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: azw lrf lit doc
Category: History
Subcategory: World

Marty, Martin . 1928-.

Marty, Martin . United States - Church history. United States - Religion. New York, NY : Penguin Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Martin Marty, one of today’s most respected theologians, is professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, where the Martin . For a highly readable and engaging history of religion in America, you can't get much better than Marty.

Martin Marty, one of today’s most respected theologians, is professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, where the Martin Marty Center has been founded to promote public religion endeavors. His more than fifty books include Modern American Religion. He is a winner of the National Book Award and was the first religion scholar to receive the National Humanities Medal. Pilgrims" is the work of an accomplished scholar who knows how to write history as it should be: an ongoing drama filled with interesting characters moved by varying motivations.

This book covers 500 years in about 500 pages so don't expect minute detail. So far, this is one of the better history records of religion in America

This book covers 500 years in about 500 pages so don't expect minute detail. So far, this is one of the better history records of religion in America. It gives an overview through the development of the country with different perspectives from the various churches and their influences at specific times. Reads a little slow because you want to catch the detailed interaction that is being explained.

Читать бесплатно книгу Pilgrims in their own land. Marty, Martin E. (1928-). New York : Penguin Books, 1985. XII, 500 p. - Bibliogr. 500 years of religion in America (Marty M. и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Автор: Marty Martin E. Marty Martin E. Pilgrims in their own land. Pilgrims in their own land : 500 years of religion in America, M. E. Marty. p. 478-488; Index: p. 489-500. ISBN 0140082689 : Б. ц. Войдите для заказа услуг.

Marty's effort will inevitably be measured against Sydney Ahlstrom's Religious History of the American People (which won a National Book Award in 1973), and it stands the comparison quite well. Only a third as long, it necessarily omits the details of denominational life, the minor figures (Asahel Nettleton, John Henry Hobart, Washington Gladden) and movements (Schwenckfelders, Hopedale Community, Dispensational Premillenialism), and chooses to highlight certain representative names: John Woolman over William Lloyd Garrison to illustrate Abolition; Hiram Bingham rather than Adoniram.

Martin E. Martin had his biases as any other author He gives some thoughts that accommodated their theology to Darwin . This manuscript is a wonderful history of religion in America. It is a must read for a serious Christian historian

Martin E. Martin had his biases as any other author. His being the ideas of Post Modern thought. This book is religion as cultural phenomena. Mormonism is dealt with some detail. Mennonites and Amish are subject to less detail. He gives some thoughts that accommodated their theology to Darwin arguments and those who did not. The author is more supportive to the former and not the latter. It is a must read for a serious Christian historian. It does however, tend to speak to empathetically about views that are dramatically unorthodox according to established and fundamental Biblical doctrine.

The Martin E. Marty Award for the Public Understanding of Religion is named for Marty, and has been awarded annually since 1996. Pilgrims in Their Own Land: 500 Years of Religion in America (1984) New York: Penguin. The Public Church: -Catholic (1981) New York: Crossroads.

Religion: Comparative, General & Reference. Country of Publication.

It is in one sense a study of migration, with each wave of immigrants bringing a set of religious beliefs to a new world. The narrative unfolds through sharply detailed biographical vignettes-stories of religious "pathfinders," including William Penn, Mary Baker Eddy, Henry David Thoreau, and many other leaders of movements, both marginal and mainstream.

Just better Pilgrims in Their Own Land: 500 Years of Religion in America (1984) New York: Penguin.

He has maintained that authorial pace in his retirement. The New Shape of American Religion (1958) New York: Harper and Brothers.

Pilgrims in Their Own Land is Martin E. Marty's vivid chronological account of the people and events that carved the spiritual landscape of America. It is in one sense a study of migration, with each wave of immigrants bringing a set of religious beliefs to a new world. The narrative unfolds through sharply detailed biographical vignettes—stories of religious "pathfinders," including William Penn, Mary Baker Eddy, Henry David Thoreau, and many other leaders of movements, both marginal and mainstream. In addition, Marty considers the impact of religion on social issues such as racism, feminism, and utopianism.

And engrossing, highly readable, and comprehensive history, Pilgrims in Their Own Land is written with respect, appreciation, and insight into the multitude of religious groups that represent expressions of spirituality in America.

Comments: (7)
Roram
Anyone who might think they know all about the history of Christianity is mistaken if they've not read this most interesting book. This was one book I had difficulty putting down. Marty makes clear to his readers that religious strife did not end when persecuted Christians fled Europe and what religious contributions each immigrant group brought to America. Buy and feast on this one!!
Adorardana
I had the paperback version as a textbook in college and I had often wished I had a copy on my shelves to refer to, to check to verify information when writing or in groups..
Kirizius
Marty has done a good job of covering a wide breadth of material using language that the everyday reader can understand. Unfortunately, his book is very unreadable due to the following faults:

1. Organization - The book feels like a randomly assorted collection of paragraphs that jump back and forth between various timeframes. One will find mention of a particular historical character who is discussed for a page or so, only to find the discussion picked back up several pages later.

One will also find that the chronology within each chapter jumps back and forth between decades and even centuries. Rather than presenting history in a way which starts from the past and proceeds toward the present, Marty discusses topic after topic which does not correspond in timeframe or in similitude of subject.

There are no subheadings to guide the presentation on any kind of coherent theme or argument. There are occassions where the chapter title hints at the topic of the next 20 pages, but one struggles to find an actual argument that can be traced throughout the chapter.

There is no summary paragraph at the end of the chapters which outlines the main idea that was being communicated throughout the chapter. This is most likely due to the fact that there is no consistent theme under consideration in each chapter.

The work reads like a collected series of short essays pasted together non-chronologically where the reader is constantly asking "Why are you now discussing _____ when the last sentence was on a completely different topic in a different period of time and in a different place?"

2. Argumentation - Marty generally does not argue for what happened or why and does not present reasons which support any consistent argument throughout his chapters.

3. Word choice - while Marty does include primary source quotations, the context in which they arise does not make use of colorful language which brings the story to life for the reader. It reads much more like bullet format statements which merely state the facts.

Because of the overall structure of the book and style of presentation, this book would be much better used as a small reference encyclopedia for those who need to look up a quick fact about a particular character or event rather than a readable book which takes you through a coherent story of pilgrims in America. Even as a reference volume, the book lack sufficient indexes to provide the locations of all the characters discussed which detracts from its overall value. For example, Samuel Davies who is discussed on pp. 126-127 is not listed in the index.
Shem
Last spring my pastor asked me to teach an adult level Sunday School class on the history of American Christianity. After consulting with two professors of religious history and considerable library browsing, I settled on this book for reasons on availability and cost, inclusiveness, and the reputation of the author. It has worked exceedingly well, better than I hoped. Marty did occasionally forget to provide basic definitions and overviews, but overall I think this is the best book for any similar class.
Quamar
An excellent survey, probably biting off more than any author could chew in 500 year of religious history.
Vaua
Yes
Golkree
For a highly readable and engaging history of religion in America, you can't get much better than Marty. "Pilgrims" is the work of an accomplished scholar who knows how to write history as it should be: an ongoing drama filled with interesting characters moved by varying motivations. All historians, however, let their personal worldviews slip onto the page, and this is the only complaint that I have about Marty. As a liberal Protestant theologian and historian he has a tendency to discredit evangelical theology. This is not so much of a problem when he deals with the great evangelicals of previous centuries (the Francis Asburys and the Jonathan Edwards, for example), but as he approaches the twentieth century he clearly favors the theology of, say, Reinhold Niebuhr or Walter Rauschenbusch over the conversion theology of Billy Graham (perhaps he thinks Jesus' statement that, "you must be born again," applies only to conservative politicians?). This is a minor quibble, however, and one that is to be expected. Marty paints the picture of American religious life as a vivid panorama of people and movements committed, in their own way, to that particularly American brand of the human search for God.
This book s so boring, being a biology major and being required to read this book for a class is very devastating.