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eBook Apocalypse. An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library) download

by Benjamin Garstad,Pseudo-Methodius

eBook Apocalypse. An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library) download ISBN: 0674053079
Author: Benjamin Garstad,Pseudo-Methodius
Publisher: Harvard University Press (June 4, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 464
ePub: 1214 kb
Fb2: 1665 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: rtf mobi mbr docx
Category: History
Subcategory: World

An Alexandrian World Chronicle is an originally East Roman document from the 6th century, awarded as a. .Pseudo-Methodius contains a number of odd claims, who may be of considerable interest to Afro-centrists, if they ever choose to pick up this book.

An Alexandrian World Chronicle is an originally East Roman document from the 6th century, awarded as a diplomatic gift to the Merovingian Franks by ambassadors of Emperor Justinian. The Apocalypse, wrongly attributed to a martyred 4th century bishop named Methodius, was written at a time when the originally relatively tolerant Umayyad caliphs of Damascus were increasing the tax burdens on their Christian subjects, thereby creating a (probably unintentional) incentive to leave the Christian faith and convert to Islam.

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, . Cambridge, Mass. and London: Harvard University Press, 2010. Benjamin Garstad, ed. And trans. "Apocalypse" of Pseudo-Methodius. An Alexandrian World Chronicle. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 14). Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012.

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 14. Apocalypse. The Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius was one of the first works composed in response to the Arab invasions and the establishment of the Muslim empire in the seventh century. In a matter of decades, it was translated from its original Syriac into Greek and from Greek into Latin. Both the Greek and Latin texts are presented here.

Garstad, Benjamin (2012), Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius. An Alexandrian World Chronicle, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 14, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, ISBN 978-0-674-05307-6. Hahn, Johannes (2006), ""Vetustus error extinctus est": Wann wurde das Sarapeion von Alexandria zerstört?", Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte, 55 (3): 368–383, JSTOR 4436822.

Download with Google. Pseudo-Methodius, Apocalypse; An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, volume 14).

An Alexandrian World Chronicle, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 14. Title. Pseudo-Methodius: Apocalypse. An Alexandrian World Chronicle, Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 14. Publication Type.

An Alexandrian World Chronicle," Speculum 88, no. 2 (April 2013): 515-517.

Recommend this journal to your librarian for subscription. An Alexandrian World Chronicle," Speculum 88, no.

Pseudo-Methodius, Benjamin Garstad (Translator). Other books in the series. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library (1 - 10 of 53 books). Books by Pseudo-Methodius. An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Excerpta Latina Barbari) was considered important by no less a humanist than Joseph Scaliger. He recognized it as a representative of an early stage in the Christian chronicle tradition that would dominate medieval historiography.

An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Excerpta Latina Barbari) was considered important by no less a humanist than Joseph Scaliger. The original Greek text may have been a diplomatic gift from the court of Justinian to a potential ally among Frankish royalty, translated two centuries later by the Franks themselves in their efforts to convert the pagan Saxons.

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library. Old English Shorter Poems, 2 volumes. One Hundred Latin Hymns: Ambrose to Aquinas.

This volume contains two texts that crossed the Mediterranean in Late Antiquity. The Apocalypse of Pseudo-Methodius was one of the first works composed in response to the Arab invasions and the establishment of the Muslim empire in the seventh century. In a matter of decades, it was translated from its original Syriac into Greek and from Greek into Latin. (Both the Greek and Latin texts are presented here.) The Apocalypse enjoyed immense popularity throughout the Middle Ages, informing expectations of the end of the world, responses to strange and exotic invaders like the Mongols and Turks, and even the legendary versions of the life of Alexander the Great. An Alexandrian World Chronicle (Excerpta Latina Barbari) was considered important by no less a humanist than Joseph Scaliger. He recognized it as a representative of an early stage in the Christian chronicle tradition that would dominate medieval historiography. The original Greek text may have been a diplomatic gift from the court of Justinian to a potential ally among Frankish royalty, translated two centuries later by the Franks themselves in their efforts to convert the pagan Saxons. In addition to presenting a universal chronicle with a comprehensive ethnography and geography, the Excerpta offer a Euhemeristic narrative of the gods and another account of Alexander.