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eBook They Like Jesus but Not the Church Participant's Guide: Six Sessions Responding to Culture's Objections to Christianity download

by Dan Kimball

eBook They Like Jesus but Not the Church Participant's Guide: Six Sessions Responding to Culture's Objections to Christianity download ISBN: 0310277949
Author: Dan Kimball
Publisher: Zondervan (March 9, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 144
ePub: 1888 kb
Fb2: 1933 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: World

In this six-session small group Bible study, They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball explores and addresses the most common objections and misconceptions about Christianity.

In this six-session small group Bible study, They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball explores and addresses the most common objections and misconceptions about Christianity. Led by author Dan In this six-session small group Bible study, They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball explores and addresses the most common objections and misconceptions about Christianity.

Six Sessions Responding to Culture. s Objections to Christianity. A Captivating Guide to Crucial Moments in Christian History, Including Events Such as the Life and Teachings of Jesus Christ, the Early Church, and the Reformation. Скидка 5%. Wesley Hugh Moore The Spiritual Top 50. Найти похожее. Shannyn Schroeder Hot.

Six Sessions on Insights from Emerging Generations.

They Like Jesus but Not the Church Participant's Guide. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove They Like Jesus but Not the Church Participant's Guide from your list? They Like Jesus but Not the Church Participant's Guide. Six Sessions on Insights from Emerging Generations. Published March 2008 by Zondervan.

But Not the Church is a six-session, video-based study by Dan Kimball that explores six of the most common objections and misunderstandings emerging generations have about the church and Christianity.

They Like Jesus But Not the Church is a six-session, video-based study by Dan Kimball that explores six of the most common objections and misunderstandings emerging generations have about the church and Christianity. The objections come from conversations and interviews the church has had with un-churched twenty and thirty-somethings at coffee houses.

In this six-session small group Bible study, They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball explores and addresses the most common objections and misconceptions.

This is a ministry resource book exploring six of the most common objects and misunderstandings emerging generations have about the church and Christianity. The objections come from conversations and interviews the church has had with unchurched twenty and thirty-somethings at coffee houses. To read this book, upload.

If you like Jesus and the church, you need to read this book. The Barna Institute book provides us with statistical analyses of young people’s disconnect from mainline Christianity. It will give you a window into the heart of a world that desperately needs Jesus and a new vision of his bride, the church. Kimball’s book provides us with anecdotes that put a human face to the statistics.

Dan Kimball - They Like Jesus but Not the Church: Six Sessions Responding to Culture's Objections .

Dan Kimball - They Like Jesus but Not the Church: Six Sessions Responding to Culture's Objections to Christianity. Posing the question, ""what does God want?"" for people in their twenties, this book offers readers advice on how to align their goals with heavenly principles while finding personal satisfaction in love, on the job, and in life in general. TwentySomeone: Finding Yourself in a Decade of Transition.

In this six-session small group Bible study, They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball explores and addresses the most common objections and misconceptions about Christianity.

Ask someone today if he or she likes Jesus, and the answer is usually yes. But ask if that person likes the church, and chances are you will get a far less favorable response.

Led by author Dan Kimball, this six-session small group Bible study will help you explore and respond truthfully, caringly, and engagingly to the most common objections and misunderstandings culture has about the church and Christianity. Through interviews with those who like Jesus but not the church and teaching by Dan Kimball, this small group Bible study will teach you how to respond to the common objections of the faith. Includes discussion questions and resource listings.

This Participant Guide is designed for use together with the They Like Jesus But Not the Church DVD (sold separately) and includes discussion questions for individuals and groups. When used together, they provide you with a practical tool than can strengthen your faith.

Sessions include: 1. The Danger of the Christian Bubble 2. Is the Church Negative, Judgmental, and Political? 3. Does the Church Restrict and Oppress Women? 4. Is the Church Homophobic? 5. Do Christians Arrogantly Think All Other Religions Are Wrong? 6. Are Christians Fundamentalists Who Take The Whole Bible Literally?

Comments: (7)
Goltizuru
Dan Kimball does a great job of expressing how the outside world actually views the Church. In this study he shares compelling examples of how we Christians tend to live inside a bubble of our own making, keeping the world out and sheltering ourselves from exposure.

People outside the church, (especially those from younger generations) are likely to base their opinion of the church on things they see in media... street corner evangelists, snake handlers, and the outspoken fringe of the church. They don't really know any true Christians, because we have scuttled ourselves away and hid from them. (Reminds me of an old song from Sunday school about hiding our light under a bushel!)

Dan will challenge the way you practice your faith in light of the person of Jesus. You will find yourself being asked to break out of the bubble so that people who are far from God can find him in you. This little study is beginning to change perceptions and practices among people in our church who have taken the class. I know that as we follow the principles that Kimball sets forth, we are getting closer to the heart of Jesus... Truly loving people, and offering an untainted gospel message of forgiveness and redemption.

In His Service,

Lance Stratton
Executive Pastor, Tierrasanta Baptist Church
Keath
This is an excellent resource that "yes" is built around using the DVD. To be honest, I had read the book and wanted to teach the class myself so that the class was more relational and interactive, and using this booklet coupled with the actual book worked out just fine.

Dan Kimball has a great resource here and a terrific ministry.
Aradwyn
Product arrived later than I anticipated but I guess within a week and a half. Other than that no compliants yet... love this book and my small group will be finishing up the first session next week. I recommend! :)
Jaberini
A great resource
Vetibert
Great quality. Brand new!
Hasirri
Dan Kimball is a pastor at Vintage Faith Church in California, and serves as a faculty member and director of the ReGeneration Project at Western Seminary, and as adjunct faculty at other universities including George Fox University. He has written/cowritten other books such as Sacred Space: A Hands-On Guide to Creating Multisensory Worship Experiences for Youth Ministry,The Emerging Church: Vintage Christianity for New Generations,Emerging Worship: Creating Worship Gatherings for New Generations,Adventures in Churchland: Finding Jesus in the Mess of Organized Religion, etc.

He wrote in the Introduction to this 2007 book, “This book is not just my opinions. This book is the result of years of being in ministry… This book is not about statistics but is based on real people and their opinions and stories…. This book will likely make you feel uncomfortable… because the comments of the people I interviewed were often rather depressing. They said some rather harsh and striking things about the church and Christianity… This book will give you hope… Yes, they had some harsh things to say… but as the title of this book implies, they are open to Jesus, and this gives me great hope.” (Pg. 18-21)

He defines the term “missional”: “Being missional means we see the church not as a place we go only on Sunday but as something we are throughout the week… Being missional means that we understand that we don’t ‘bring Jesus’ to people but that we realize Jesus is active in culture and we join him in what he is doing… Being missional means we are very much in the world and engaged in culture but are not conforming to the world.” (Pg. 20)

He points out, “The longer we are Christians, the fewer the number of friends we have who are not Christians. Even though Christians often work alongside non-Christians or have non-Christian neighbors or sit next to nonbelieving students in class, we generally tend not to actually befriend them, or pray regularly for them, or get involved in their lives so they trust us and we can be the salt and light of Jesus to them… And I’m not talking about street witnessing to strangers. I’m talking about relationships in which we dialogue and build trust with people who get to know us personally. If Jesus sent us on a mission… why is it that we have basically set up our church systems and subcultures to remove maturing people from relationships with people outside of the church?” (Pg. 43-44)

After seeing a young man’s controversial T-shirt about Jesus, he comments, “This young man forced his shirt on people by wearing it in public. He felt that the message needed to get out there, but should we be the message? Shouldn’t we be building friendships with people so they see the message living in us? Then after we’ve gained their trust, we’d have the credibility to dialog about these things. We would present the message to others better if we were demonstrations of the love of Jesus…. Wearing an overtly condemning T-shirt … only reinforces the perception of Christians as negative and judgmental.” (Pg. 101)

He laments, “It seems that in many of our churches, we get excited about someone coming to the faith, but then we subtly make it clear that for them to be fully accepted, they need to conform to our church’s culture… It’s a weird, hard thing for a new believer when we set these extra standards of acceptance that have nothing to do with sin and everything to do with the church subculture. We should leave the job of transforming people to the Holy Spirit, even letting them keep their uniquenesses, and instead spend our time loving them and accepting them in our church community.” (Pg. 109)

He argues, “we can’t just be saying that there shouldn’t be females in leadership because the twelve disciples of Jesus were all males. The problem with using that argument is that you could also say they were all Jewish, so we shouldn’t have non-Jews in leadership today. We also see that females WERE included in leadership roles. We have to be thinking this issue through deeper today, and no matter what viewpoint we hold, truly have thoughtful answers.” (Pg. 133)

He argues, “So when we actually study world religions, we see that it’s not the case that all roads lead to Got, because you cannot have God saying he is one God, as in Islam and Christianity, but have thousands of gods in Hinduism. And you can’t say that Jesus is the Son of God and the Savior, as Christianity teaches, but then have Islam say that Jesus is just a prophet. These beliefs are different and even contradictory. Explaining this to people who have never really thought it through leads to the question, So which one is true? When it comes to the fundamental teachings of the various world faiths, either they are all wrong, or only one is right. They can’t all be true.” (Pg. 181)

He suggests, “some Christians … take a dogmatic stance on an issue based on a single Bible verse. But we are living in a culture in which we can’t make such statements with integrity anymore. It’s more effective to say, ‘The Bible says it. I believe the Bible is inspired. In take into consideration who the Spirit used to write it, to whom it was written, and the cultural context it was written in. I read the context of the verse, not just the verse itself. I study various commentaries to see what a variety of scholars say about it, praying the whole time I’m studying. And that forms my best understanding of it.’” (Pg. 201)

He summarizes, “What I think most people mean is that they like Jesus, but they don’t like what people have turned the church into. We need to explain to those who like Jesus but not the church that Jesus loves the church, and that if they truly like Jesus, then they cannot help but also like the church, because it’s his church and his bride. They need the church because it’s the expression of Jesus as his body. If they put their faith in Jesus, whether they realize it or not, they are supernaturally part of the church. But we need to help them understand the difference between the church and what we sometimes turn it into.” (Pg. 251)

This is an insightful, open-minded book that will be of great interest to anyone studying the Emerging Church, or similar contemporary movements in Christianity.
Rollers from Abdun
We are 90% complete with the study. It has been very good for probing difficult issues about the opinion of others about the church. Our study group attendance has increased and participants are engaged in discussion and the video interviews.

The challenge now is finding ways to maintain the momentum after the final module of this study.
This is a thought provoking book as we are using in a small group setting. Don't have to agreee with author 100% on every topic, but he gist hits home