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eBook Bodyguard of Lies download

by Anthony Cave Brown

eBook Bodyguard of Lies download ISBN: 0060105518
Author: Anthony Cave Brown
Publisher: Harper & Row; 1st edition (October 1, 1975)
Language: English
Pages: 947
ePub: 1160 kb
Fb2: 1745 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi mbr azw docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

Bodyguard of Lies is a 1975 non-fiction book written by Anthony Cave Brown, his first major historical work.

Bodyguard of Lies is a 1975 non-fiction book written by Anthony Cave Brown, his first major historical work.

Anthony Cave Brown presents a large and fascinating cast of heroes and rogues and sweeps through dozens of dramatic stories of plot and counterplot, stealth and treachery, lies and deceits. We learn the full story behind Churchill’s agonizing decision not to warn the city of Coventry that it was about to be destroyed, the deadly cat-and-mouse games between Allied agents in France and the Gestapo, the near fiasco of Montgomery’s double, who could not be kept sober, and the heroic but doomed efforts of the anti-Hitler German underground.

Bodyguard of Lies book.

Intelligence in recent public literature. By Anthony Cave Brown. Harper & Row, New York, 1975. 947 p. The rather improbable title of this book - an outstanding example of what might perhaps best be described as scholarly investigative journalism applied to the field of oral1 military history - finds its origins in the following Churchill quotation: "In war-time, truth is so precious that she should always be attended by a bodyguard of lies.

BODYGUARD OF LIES By Anthony Cave Brown - Hardcover Mint Condition. I don't remember how I found this book except that I've always loved reading about WW2. I was having a beer with a colleague on Rush Street in Chicago late one night when he asked me "what's the best book you ever read?' I answered "Bodyguard Of Lies"- he answered "Me too!" Sinse then,I've read all of Anthony Cave-Brown's books. I hope he's still with us and still writing. Наиболее популярные в Художественная литература.

Anthony Cave Brown, reply by Hugh Trevor-Roper. October 14, 1976 Issue. In response to: The Ultra Ultra Secret from the February 19, 1976 issue.

by. Anthony Cave Brown. by. World war II, counterintelligence, espionage. ark:/13960/t2h76xk6c. Ocr. ABBYY FineReader 1. (Extended OCR).

Bodyguard of Lies is the fourteenth episode of Season Two. It is the twenty-seventh episode of the series overall

Bodyguard of Lies is the fourteenth episode of Season Two. It is the twenty-seventh episode of the series overall. While preparing for battle, Clarke and Lexa have a heated discussion. Filming of this episode started December 8, 2014.

Body guard of Lies (London: Star Books, 1977). New Lies for Old (London: The Bodley Heard, 1984). Goulden, Joseph C. Korea: the Untold Story (New York: Times Books, 1982). The Last Hero: Wild Bill Donovan (New York: Times Books 1982). The Cambridge Comintern'.

Examines Allied intelligence and counter-intelligence operations during World War II, describing the cipher machine used to break German codes and the tactics, ruses, and deceptions employed to ensure the successful invasion of Normandy
Comments: (7)
Anasius
The information in this book will instill much anger about the nature of total war. While the duplicity and deception led to many important military successes, it often did so at an awful toll upon the military forces involved. Foreknowledge provides a massive advantage to military victories, but what of the decisions made to use such advanced knowledge, especially knowing they would inflict deadly harm on their own forces? A question not answered is whether WWII could have come to an end before D-Day through an earlier "negotiated" German surrender? A good question since more lives were lost by far after D-Day than before, and Russia had not yet over-run all of Eastern Europe. We know the post-WWII outcome was followed by a lengthy and costly cold war, but can only guess how an earlier end to the war might have evolved in the decades after the war ended. The book does not address this question, but as you read through it, such a question will be likely aroused. It's a well-written and valuable account of a terrible era in our 20th century history. Read it for greater enlightenment, if for no other reason!
VariesWent
This is a big book, heavy in all ways. But it is well written. It was recommended to me by a friend who knows that I read slowly. I have read the preface and started chapter 1. If the rest of the book is as good, it will be 5 stars no doubt.

If you want to know much of what went on to deceive Hitler about the plans to invade Normandy, this is the best place to start. Unlike most TV shows made for the US market, it was the British who led the deception. The US had a heavy role, of course, but the British can claim most of the credit. The invasion of Normady was a winner-take-all event. Had we lost, Hitler would have destroyed most of the armies of Britain and the US, Roosevelt may not have been re-elected, and Hitler would send his forces to the east and may have defeated Russia on his second try. He would have dominated Europe forcing Britain and the US to a compromise treaty, and we may not have had the will to defeat Japan. We barely had that will after the defeat of Germany. So the successful deception about Normandy was key to winning WWII. The information in this book should be general knowledge. Some of it is, most of it is not.
Modred
This book is about the secret war of World War II. I read it when it first came out. I was shocked at what is revealed about the war within a war. I thought that it would soon change the way the history of the WW II was told. Now many years later I am still waiting for our history books to tell the truth! Over the last five years I have told high school history teachers about the book and none of them had heard about the book and the facts that were revealed in it. Just the fact that Britain and the US knew how to decode most of the coded messages of the German military, but would not use the information without some physical proof except once or twice during even the worst moments of the War are shocking. It is kind of like Charles Mee's book: The Meeting at Potsdam which revealed the truth about our use of the Atomic Bomb against Japan has not changed the way we tell our people about it. When we hear that Japan was trying to find a way of stopping the war and Truman deciding that we would use it almost solely to threaten Stalin! Tells a truth that questions our morality! I bought several copies to give to teachers at Amazon over the last several years.

But if I had $10 for every time I heard or read the term: "The truth will set you free," then I would be a very wealthy man. And if I had a $1000 for every time a person of power told the clear truth, then I would not have any more money.
Dagdatus
Required reading for those who seek a better understanding of the buildup towards the D-Day assault and the foundation for the cold war that followed WW2. Unbelievable detail with respect to the ,"special Relationship" between the US and The United Kingdom. An accurate depiction of the US as an Adolescent Super Power entering the war reluctantly but with a fascinating combination of ignorance and arrogance and growing might that has continued to characterize US foreign policy to this day.The section on the Enigma machine and the Bletchly Park effort to penetrate the code is worth the price of admission alone, but there is so much more. Read it!
mIni-Like
While focused on the D Day invasion this book covers the entire war and gave me insights that I never had regarding the behind the scenes events that are so skillfully laid out in this book. It is a long book but filled with details that kept me reading until I had finished it. If you want to learn more about the history of this period I cannot do more than highly recommend this book.
Foginn
Boot was better than expected condition. Great Book!
Tisicai
Well written history of the D Day invasion
I was quite surprized at the great amount of planning that went into the D-Day landings, and I can see that it was really not a sure bet. But the amount of detail planning for when, where and how to land there should be more widely known.