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eBook Sniper Ace: From the Eastern Front to Siberia download

by David L. Robbins,Bruno Sutkus

eBook Sniper Ace: From the Eastern Front to Siberia download ISBN: 1848325487
Author: David L. Robbins,Bruno Sutkus
Publisher: Casemate Publishers; First Edition edition (November 19, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1970 kb
Fb2: 1461 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf mobi docx mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

Bruno Sutkus provides us a well documented autobiography of his World War II experiences and most important his . The first being Sutkus' struggles on the Eastern Front. The additional of excerpts from his sniper book adds to the accuracy of his claims.

Bruno Sutkus provides us a well documented autobiography of his World War II experiences and most important his years of confinement to the Soviet Union. The summary of the war's end as seen by Sutkus is simply that there were more of them than of us. He writes that normal front lines had one Ivan for every fifteen meters while the Germans had one soldier for every fifty to seventy-five meters. The second half of the book describes his life avoiding capture in his homeland of East Prussia which was now occupied by the Soviets.

Introduction written by David L. Robbins.

After being wounded in January 1945, Sutkus was given time to recuperate away from the Eastern Front. During this time he met a Red Cross nurse, to whom he gave all his journal. When the war finished, Sutkus was forced to join the Red Army. He deserted to join the Lithuanian resistance fighters. After being captured again he was tortured by the KGB and deported to Siberia to endure forced labor. Introduction written by David L.

After being wounded in January 1945, Sutkus was given time to recuperate away from the Eastern Front

After being wounded in January 1945, Sutkus was given time to recuperate away from the Eastern Front.

Bruno Sutkus was one of the most successful German snipers on the Eastern Front, with 207 recorded kills to his name

Bruno Sutkus was one of the most successful German snipers on the Eastern Front, with 207 recorded kills to his name. This autobiography, party based on his sniper log, tells his story during and after the Second World War. At the end of the war Sutkus fell into Soviet hands, and after a short period of relative freedom in and around Lithuania was forced into exile in Siberia.

This is not a typical book written by an accomplished author but rather more like a summary of the authors own sniper log book during WWII. The first half of the book covers Bruno Sutkus’ fairly short but active combat time on the Eastern Front as a sniper. There is some information about the German Sniper school and other very interesting historical information about the German Sniper program during the war. It does read like a log book and actually has many log entries from his 209 confirmed kills including many photos of pages from his log book as well as letters and commendations.

Bilgisayar Dünyası Genel. Robbins

Bilgisayar Dünyası Genel. Sniper Ace From The Eastern Front To Siberia. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. The journal of Sutkus is one of only a few such books to have survived the war. It records more than 200 kills, placing him as one of the war's most successful snipers. A large part of his journal is reproduced for the first time here. This book provides a unique and fascinating in-depth look at the day to day life of an operational sniper.

Throughout World War II, German snipers were obliged to carry a 'Scharfshutzen Buch' which recorded every kill. Read full description. Sniper Ace: From the Eastern Front to Siberia by Bruno Sutkus (Hardback, 2009). Brand new: lowest price.

this book was very good! it read very well and was like sitting with my grandfather on a sunday afternoon. the first part of the book was like most old vet stories. he didnt dwell on whys and how comes, but told what was going on and gave just enough to keep you going. the second half is where you really bond with. the details of his exile were moving and the treatment of the pow's and the natives was just horrable. the feeling of blind stupidity that the communist party people had was amazing. but i guess thats why that feel apart in the long run. this is a good book for any.

Each success noted had to be verified by a witness and signed by a superior officer

Overview: Throughout World War II, German snipers were obliged to carry a ’Scharfshützen Buch’ which recorded every kill. Each success noted had to be verified by a witness and signed by a superior officer. It records more than 200 kills, placing him as one of the war’s most successful snipers.

Throughout World War II, German snipers were obliged to carry a ’Scharfshützen Buch’ which recorded every kill. Each success noted had to be verified by a witness and signed by a superior officer.The journal of Sutkus is one of only a few such books to have survived the war. It records more than 200 kills, placing him as one of the war’s most successful snipers. A large part of his journal is reproduced for the first time here.As a Hitler Youth member his skill as a marksman was quickly noted and, in July 1943, aged 19, he was drafted into the Wehrmacht. A month later he was sent on a five month sniper’s course in Wilna, after which he was posted to the Eastern Front. He was so successful that his superiors sent him to crucial positions. Despite his age, he was regarded as one of Germany’s best snipers and in November 1944 he was awarded the Scharfshützenabzeichen 3 Stufe – the highest award for a sniper.After being wounded in January 1945, Sutkus was given time to recuperate away from the Eastern Front. During this time he met a Red Cross nurse, to whom he gave all his journal.When the war finished, Sutkus was forced to join the Red Army. He deserted to join the Lithuanian resistance fighters. After being captured again he was tortured by the KGB and deported to Siberia to endure forced labor. It was not until the collapse of the Soviet Union that he was able return to Germany and find his journal, still in the hands of the same nurse.Introduction written by David L. Robbins.
Comments: (7)
Tejar
The book can be divided into two halves. The first being Sutkus' struggles on the Eastern Front. The additional of excerpts from his sniper book adds to the accuracy of his claims. The second half of the book describes his life avoiding capture in his homeland of East Prussia which was now occupied by the Soviets. He is eventually arrested and charged with crimes against the state but is released. The bad: I wish he had gone more into technical aspects of being a sniper, but he did show the mental makeup the army was searching for. The good: Sutkus' life in Siberia is a fascinating story of survival of both the elements and politics of post-war Russia.
furious ox
Mr. Sutkus writes a nice two part book, the first being his childhood and career as a farmer and then soldier. The latter half are his adventures in post war Soviet Russia, ending up with his life in the Baltics and then Germany.

I'm reminded a lot of the "The White Sniper: Simo Haayaa". If you liked it you will like this book.

There is a lot of attention to fieldcraft and sniping. This alone makes the book worthwhile. In addition, there is a lot of focus on the business of overcoming odds imposed by a foolish government that was wounded by Nazis and then held by by ideologues and bureaucrats.
Leceri
I was looking for books about capable German snipers and this one, and Sepp Allerberger's, stood out. (I would say that Sepp's read has more actual combat to relate as he fought longer and the writer of Sepp's had a style that provided a better read). And if you have to choose between the two I would go with Sepp's read. However, both have merits.

Sutkus was a sniper for the Wehrmacht for the last portion of the war and was outstanding as a sniper and soldier (being so fearless at one point he recounted letting an opposing sniper shoot him in the chest, knowing his layers of clothes would stop the bullet at the ranges involved. He then targeted the opposing sniper who had revealed his location by the shot). One can only wonder how much greater Sutkus's reputation and accomplishments would have been had he been fighting longer in the war.

I liked his personal info prior to the war, about his growing up on a farm. My concern about such information is that it will be unnecessarily boring. However it was short and interesting.

One fact that I was not eager to read was of his post war period in a Soviet Gulag as my main interest was his war experience. So, I began to read this after-war-recollection without enthusiasm, assuming it would be merely misery-upon-misery. However, it was surprisingly interesting. Sutkus did explain the difficulty and challenges but he did not dwell on them, and ultimately it was memorable and showed him to be an impressive fellow. And, it had a pretty good ending.

Also, Sutkus went to lengths to provide evidence of his accomplishments copying out pages of his sniper log and meritorious awards for his accomplishments. This, of course, helps de-fang those who would question his narrative.

Sutkus is definitely a warrior and he provides a narrative of a strong individual dealing with difficult circumstances and doing it well.

(Note: I would have given his narrative a higher rating but Sutkus's relating of his kills were sometimes very hollow, merely mentioning them without providing much detail; useful for accounting but not maintaining interest. This left the reader unable to fully appreciate the difficulties involved in particular acts. That, and only half the book was dedicated to the war, which was my primary interest. Technically, I would probably give it a 3.5.)
Ishnjurus
Farm boy to Ostfront Soldier to skilled Sniper with 257 confirmed Kills . But then the war ends and Like millions of Germans the author enters a Bolshevik Hell that shocks and enthralls the reader. This is a great memoir of a young Life banished to post WWII Siberia.
Shou
I found this to be a sad and moving tale. I thought the sniper story part of it was somewhat incidental. It could have been really about any kind of front line soldiering in the Wehrmacht. However in the course of recounting his experiences, the author does give us many insights into the skill of sniping, and his state of mind about it. He regarded his sniping as a job he had to do, and reckoned himself effectively already dead. This is a theme echoed in many other wartime tales, such as those from the air war over Europe.

His hundreds of Soviet victims are enumerated like a football score. Some may find this offensive, however I think the author is simply trying to place this in context, that is to say, in a place where life has little value. Our idea of hell on earth was just another day for him. He does not escape unscathed, and is hit several times, but is always lucky.

He seems not terribly interested in medals, magazine articles about him (there were many) and other accolades. Why bother? he seems to think, I won't live to enjoy it.

The second half of the book begins with his experiences trying to evade Soviet attempts at tracking down former Wehrmacht snipers. At that time, any such they could find were immediately executed. Given his notoriety, this was difficult, and eventually he accepts banishment from Lithuania to Siberia, as a way of disappearing. He was not to see his homeland for another 45 years, an experience shared by many many German soldiers.

This latter part of the book could easily have become monotonous, but for me it did not. It was a graphic and moving description, albeit necessarily much abridged, of the misery and hardship endured by Germans and Russians alike under the Soviet system of that time.
Tekasa
It is clear that there is some bitterness about the act that German atrocities were stressed after the war while the Russian atrocities were covered up. The Russian atrocities are exposed here. I found the story compelling. An interesting insight into the plight of the German army during its retreat from the Russia in the closing year or two of WWll.