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eBook One Bullet Away - The Making Of A Marine Officer download

by Nathaniel Fick

eBook One Bullet Away - The Making Of A Marine Officer download ISBN: 029784556X
Author: Nathaniel Fick
Publisher: Mariner/Hougton Mifflin Co.; Export Ed edition (2005)
Language: English
Pages: 400
ePub: 1765 kb
Fb2: 1970 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit doc docx mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

The subtitle of the book is "The Making of a Marine Corps Officer. This implies that the book provides some sort of template, which is just not the case

The subtitle of the book is "The Making of a Marine Corps Officer. This implies that the book provides some sort of template, which is just not the case.

One Bullet Away: The Making of a Marine Officer is an autobiography by Nathaniel Fick, published by Houghton-Mifflin in 2005.

One Bullet Away The Making Of A Marine Officer Nathaniel Fick HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY . He had just graduated from Officer Candidates School, and would escort us on the hour's drive to the Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia.

He had just graduated from Officer Candidates School, and would escort us on the hour's drive to the Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia. Shortly after we pulled away from the recruiting office, he stood in the aisle and turned to face us. I expected a welcome, a joke, some commiseration.

In combat you are just one bullet away from death - or promotion

In combat you are just one bullet away from death - or promotion. But this doesn't focus the mind: it makes it freeze up - unless your training is so thorough that you overcome exhaustion and terror. After receiving a BA in classics from Dartmouth in 1999, Nathaniel Fick passed the US Marines officer training course and joined the Corps just before 9/11.

One Bullet Away never shrinks from blunt truths, but ultimately it is an. .If the Marines are "the few, the proud," Recon Marines are the fewest and the proudest. Nathaniel Fick's career begins with a hellish summer at Quantico, after his junior year at Dartmouth

If the Marines are "the few, the proud," Recon Marines are the fewest and the proudest. Nathaniel Fick's career begins with a hellish summer at Quantico, after his junior year at Dartmouth. He leads a platoon in Afghanistan just after 9/11 and advances to the pinnacle-Recon- two years later, on the eve of war with Iraq. His vast skill set puts him in front of the front lines, leading twenty-two Marines into the deadliest conflict since Vietnam. He vows to bringall his men home safely, and to do so he'll need more than his top-flight education.

Peace - War - Aftermath

Peace - War - Aftermath. Only one Marine in a hundred qualifies for Recon, charged with working clandestinely, often behind enemy lines. Fick's training begins with a hellish summer at Quantico, and advances to the pinnacle-Recon-four years later, on the eve of war with Iraq

One Bullet Away is a terrific book by a natural writer.

One Bullet Away is a terrific book by a natural writer. -Tom Ricks, military correspondent, Washington Post, and author of Making the Corps, "Makes a Compelling Argument for an Oft-Overlooked Military Virture: Competence. "A remarkable book that will give today's readers a much fuller picture of the realities of their military, and that will be read for many years to come because of its vivid, humane, unsparing but also humorous. Steven Pressfield, author of Gates of Fire, "Much more than a simple dispatch from the fronts of Afghanistan and Iraq, One Bullet Away finds Nathaniel Fick reaching deep within his heart and soul.

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One Bullet Away - The Making Of A Marine Officer
Comments: (7)
Dagdarad
An excellent book. From the standpoint of an ordinary officer on Platoon level leading his unit in combat, and what they experienced - from beginning to end. Includes the variety of experience and attitudes they encountered with Iraqi civilians, many of who had been none too thrilled with Saddam and the Baathists who ruled Iraq.
For all the 'major media' portrayals and critiques of the situation, our policies that got us there, etc., this is a side of the story 'on the ground', by the guys we (or Bush ...take your pick) sent to fight the war that SHOULD BE known and understood. His unit was better prepared, so suffered fewer casualties, than many others in Iraq - but you can still come close to understanding the price that was paid (or prices).

What a shame that our bumbling leadership DIDN'T EVEN BEGIN to adequately plan for 'what to do' for stabilizing and restoring a capable government in Iraq after we had 'won the war' ...that's my thought, not necessarily his. We did that in Europe and Japan after World War II (not easy in any event) – but really fell flat this time around.
Bort
I found this book difficult to put down. Mr. Fick shares his very personal journey from becoming a Marine, fighting, and living his life (so far) afterwards. I found his sharing his struggle to be very engaging and provided me a window into what it must have been like. He reminded me again that war is a terrible thing and should always be a last resort. When it does become necessary there is no escaping the moral tightrope. Those of us who are spared having to do the fighting need to find ways to show our appreciation for their sacrifices. Thank you Mr. Fick for sharing and may the rest of your life be lived in peace.
Mikale
This is an amazing book highlighting the difficult road of going from ordinary college graduate to the super ordinary life of a marine officer, and then to war. This book was suggested to me by my son who has completed college, Officer Candidate School, The Basic School and is currently in MOS tank school for United States Marines. His statement to me was "this is remarkably accurate ". I found the book interesting, scary, and enhancing my already high regard for the marines and especially those that choose to lead as officers. This book also serves to help us focus on a difficult part of our country history, specifically Iraq and Afghanistan invasions. And the reintroduction of our soldiers into society. I recommend this book and say to captain Fick, Semper Fidelis.
Katishi
One thing that has always intrigued me is the US/British/Western(?) hierarchy between grunts, noncoms and officers. This has been the key to successful small unit tactics and flexibility. Many, many, armies have never quite gotten the hang of it and operate with essentially troopers and officers. The Soviet-derived model is officer heavy with not much importance attached to noncoms. Yet, in practice, a truly flexible and adaptable military, capable of tactical innovation, needs all 3.

Noncoms (sergeants and up, pardon me if I mess this up) are extremely key to making things work. But their "making", to echo the books' title is pretty clear. They come up from the ranks and although they command the regular soldiers they come from the same background, only they have years of experience and they are the cream of the crop. Their role is key, but this book does not cover it much.

Every army also needs officers, but the difference is that lieutenants are expected to make life and death decisions for troopers who are barely any younger than they are and who often have more combat experience. Often, their primary qualification is being more educated, which is not necessarily relevant on the battlefield. As they get older and more experienced, they, hopefully (but not always as this book also shows) become more qualified to lead troops.

Mr. Fick's book is an extremely interesting look at how the USMC trains these junior officers. In his case, due to his dedication and humility he comes out ready to take on this important responsibility. If you read through the lines, some of his fellow officers are not as good, even if the majority of officers perform admirably. Incompetent and glory seeking leaders have been the bane of the military for millennia, especially when wars are preceded by long periods of peace. Still, the overall impression I got was that the USMC is trying (no, I did not say "doing its best") to weed out the useless. Perhaps more in training than once they have graduated, which is similar to what we see in other professions, like doctors.

He mentions in passing a reason why his First Recon unit in Iraq had _some_ less than stellar leaders. Recon marines were expected to operate at the noncom/trooper level in the field. As a result, most of the officers were desk bound and might have found themselves out of their depth in the front lines.

If you are interested by the military give it a read. It is most definitely nuanced and does not "rah rah" the problems raised by the use of deadly force. Despite a deep respect for the military way of life.

One caveat: those solely interested in Iraq/Afghanistan coverage will find that it is not the main subject here. Lt. Fick only covers two fairly short deployments. On the other hand, it dovetails nicely and covers the same unit and mission as Generation Kill, albeit in a less critical fashion.
Malak
I liked this book a lot. It told an interesting story (2/3 at least about being in the 2003-2011 Iraq war), and was very well written. No dead spots in the story, no big grammar, typo, or formatting issues. Interesting information throughout, educational, well-presented and balanced in points of view, and told many very real stories of what it is like to be fighting in the fog of war as part of a large military organization.

The author did a really nice job on this book, I think. I'm amazed at the detail and accuracy throughout the book, because it's hard to imagine him taking detailed notes throughout his campaign. (On the other hand, he tells many stories of all the paperwork that is involved in planning missions, so he definitely was familiar with working with paper, as well as his recon troops!)

I would easily recommend this book to anyone who is interested in these kinds of topics.

Another good book that I liked on a similar topic (although with far fewer combat stories) is Life in the French Foreign Legion: How to Join and What to Expect When You Get There.