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by Stephen K. Scroggs

eBook Army Relations with Congress: Thick Armor, Dull Sword, Slow Horse download ISBN: 0275961761
Author: Stephen K. Scroggs
Publisher: Praeger (January 30, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1485 kb
Fb2: 1117 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx mbr doc lrf
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

Home Browse Books Book details, Army Relations with Congress: Thick Armor, Dull.

Home Browse Books Book details, Army Relations with Congress: Thick Armor, Dull. Army Relations with Congress: Thick Armor, Dull Sword, Slow Horse. By Stephen K. Scroggs. He concludes with recommendations on how the Army can become a more effective voice for its own interests and national security.

He examines the impact of culture on the varying abilities of public agencies, specifically the Army, to pursue its organizational interests through lobbying or liaising Congress.

A book's subtitle normally explains what the book is really about. Here it reflects the withering scorn that pervades this densely written study. After serving 20 years as a . Army officer, Scroggs seeks to explain why (in his view) the army. Army officer, Scroggs seeks to explain why (in his view) the army has been spectacularly inept in dealing with Congress

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Scroggs, Stephen . 1954-. Civil-military relations - United States. He examines the impact of culture on the varying abilities of public agencies, specifically the Army, to pursue its organizational interests through lobbying or liaising Congress. Scroggs argues that despite structural similarities in how the four military services approach Congress, differences in service culture affect their relative success in achieving their goals on the Hill.

He examines the impact of culture on the va. Specifications.

Army relations with Congress. thick armor, dull sword, slow horse. Published 2000 by Prager in Westport, Conn. Civil-military relations, Political activity, United States, United States. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Stephen K. Scroggs, in his book, Army Relations with Congress, Thick Armor, Dull Sword, and Slow Horse, identified several patterns of Army-congressional relations based on interviews conducted during 1995-96 with Members of Congress, Professional Staff Members, an. . Scroggs, in his book, Army Relations with Congress, Thick Armor, Dull Sword, and Slow Horse, identified several patterns of Army-congressional relations based on interviews conducted during 1995-96 with Members of Congress, Professional Staff Members, and Military Legislative Assistants. The first pattern identified was actually of a positive nature.

Relying on extensive candid interviews from members of Congress and staff on defense authorization committees and senior Army general officers, Scroggs provides a strong insider analysis with recommendations. He examines the impact of culture on the varying abilities of public agencies, specifically the Army, to pursue its organizational interests through lobbying or liaising Congress. Scroggs argues that despite structural similarities in how the four military services approach Congress, differences in service culture affect their relative success in achieving their goals on the Hill.

Scroggs draws four major conclusions. First, despite a law prohibiting lobbying of Congress by public agencies, Congress views lobbying or liaising by public entities, especially the military services, not only as a legitimate activity, but essential to Members carrying out their constitutional responsibilities. Second, relative to the other services, the Army is viewed by Congress as the least effective in its lobbying. Third, the Army's patterned approach with Congress is largely a function of its unrecognized and uncompensated culture in the unique terrain of the nation's capital. Fourth, because of the need for balanced service representation to Congress, relatively less effective Army efforts have troubling implications for national security and Army self-interest.