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eBook War Stories: An Enlisted Marine In Vietnam download

by Stephen G MacDonald

eBook War Stories: An Enlisted Marine In Vietnam download ISBN: 1466464445
Author: Stephen G MacDonald
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 16, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 250
ePub: 1911 kb
Fb2: 1464 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi doc azw lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

War Stories: An Enlisted Marine In Vietnam is a memoir of my two years. Stephen G. MacDonald has not only written a searingly intense memoir in WAR STORIES: AN ENLISTED MARINE IN VIETNAM but he has also managed to create a book that becomes a novel, surpassing the 'memoir' classification to become an Everyman's War Experience. That is an unexpected aspect of this compelling book and one that the author may not even acknowledge.

MacDonald had a good idea of what was coming for him when he dropped out of Tufts University as a sophomore and joined the Marines as his brother had done a few months earlier. His memoir carefully takes us through the training in March-April 1966-eight weeks compacted from the twelve weeks originally deemed necessary for Marine basic training.

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Her husband, Lee, is a Marine stationed overseas, in combat.

The Red Convertible Louise Erdrich. Lyman Lamartine’s brother, Henry, goes to war in Vietnam and returns three years later a changed man. Read The Red Convertible. Guests of the Nation Frank O’Connor. It is a sweltering day in Vietnam during the war after many of the troops have been withdrawn. The narrator and Lebowitz are running around a track with other soldiers. Her husband, Lee, is a Marine stationed overseas, in combat. Read The Pacific (Pg 14).

A celebrated book and a major museum exhibition revealed the harrowing tale behind the image of a wounded Marine. The fighting in Hue City, Vietnam, was as intense and confusing as anything the Marines there had ever seen. Their version was wrong. By MICHAEL SHAW FEB. 19, 2019. It was mid-February 1968, and American and South Vietnamese forces were desperately trying to counter a surprise onslaught that became known as the Tet offensive. First Battalion, Fifth Marines had breached the city’s historic Citadel.

It tells what it was like to enlist in the Marine Corps and serve as a field . If you want to know what it feels like to become a Marine, this book can help.

It tells what it was like to enlist in the Marine Corps and serve as a field radio operator with an infantry battalion. We operated near the southern edge of the DMZ in Vietnam in 1967, a time and place of intense fighting. It took forty years of writing and rewriting to distill that two years into this book, because it took that long for me to become this honest about my experience.

John Basilone – only enlisted Marine Medal of Honor recipient to return to combat and be killed. Joe Foss – leading fighter ace of the Marine Corps during World War II and Medal of Honor recipient, recognizing his role in the air combat during the Guadalcanal Campaign

John Basilone – only enlisted Marine Medal of Honor recipient to return to combat and be killed. Gregory "Pappy" Boyington – Medal of Honor recipient who commanded the famous "Black Sheep Squadron" (VMA-214) during WWII. Louis Cukela – awarded both Navy and Army Medals of Honor. Joe Foss – leading fighter ace of the Marine Corps during World War II and Medal of Honor recipient, recognizing his role in the air combat during the Guadalcanal Campaign. Jacklyn H. Lucas – youngest Marine to receive the Medal of Honor. John Lucian Smith – Medal of Honor recipient and flying ace in the battle of Guadalcanal.

The Vietnam War. APUSH: KC‑8. ii (KC), Unit 8: Learning Objective I, WOR (Theme). Learn about the war that enmeshed the United States in a battle against communism in Southeast Asia for more than twenty years. The Vietnam War was a prolonged military conflict that started as an anticolonial war against the French and evolved into a Cold War confrontation between international communism and free-market democracy.

War Stories: An Enlisted Marine In Vietnam is a memoir of my two years in the United States Marine Corps. It tells what it was like to enlist in the Marine Corps and serve as a field radio operator with an infantry battalion. We operated near the southern edge of the DMZ in Vietnam in 1967, a time and place of intense fighting. It took forty years of writing and rewriting to distill that two years into this book, because it took that long for me to become this honest about my experience. If you want to know what it feels like to become a Marine, this book can help.
Comments: (7)
Risinal
Stephen G. MacDonald has done what I wish more would and could do. He has given us a first hand peek at what it was like to be an enlisted combat Marine (A grunt), during the Vietnam War. I will start by stating that this is a very well done work.

This account has much going for it. MacDonald was a radio operator serving with a combat unit. He is extremely frank as to condition, attitudes and shares with us his own "take" on the horrendous events which were taking place around him. Folks, we are talking about a 19 year old young man here; a child really, who was caught up in a very unpopular war. He came from a rather poor background and after he lost his student deferment and not wanting to be drafted, joined the Marines - a decision which many underprivileged boys had to make at that time.

Now there is no "John Wayne" stuff here so it you are looking for that sort of read then you should look else where. I was in country myself during that time and MacDonald nails it as well as anyone. (I was a bit older than the author and was in a different service with a different rank so my views were a bit different than his but that is normal. Of the thousands that served during this war, each has their own take on things and each have their own experiences - that is how it should be.

One thing I found quite remarkable about this work is that it is a self published work. By the author's own admission he had to do most of the proofreading and editing himself; a process which took several years. He apologizes at the beginning of the book for any error in punctuation, grammar, etc. Well I am no expert in this area but to be honest I found very, very few errors and to be even more honest, I wish that many of the books being published by our large publishing houses were as well proof read and edited as this book has been.

I was also impressed by the fact that the author was quite honest when he simply could not remember things such as places and names of individual. Hey, we are talking 40 years ago and like most solders and marines of that time he apparently did not keep a diary. I like honesty in this sort of work and honesty is what we are given.

The prose is quite well done and the author tells a good, blunt and vivid story. This book, if nothing else, has great historical value.

I want to thank Stephen for his service.

Don Blankenship
The Ozarks
Spilberg
Mr. MacDonald's book is written in a very straightforward fashion. He relays his boot camp experience to us in a clear way with some minor introspection. His Vietnam experience he relays in the same fashion. Young man thrust into a harsh and deadly environment. These guys didn't just have the enemy to worry about but a whole host of things that can end or, at least, shorten your life dramatically. This young man was at some of the harshest places in South Vietnam at the time. Con Thien, The Rockpile, Hill 881 to name a few. More power to him.

Late in the book he starts to question himself as a Marine. Marines never question orders from anyone of a higher rank. No matter how bizarre the order or, how incompetent the giver of the order is. So is the Corps. There's a little self-exploration late on in the book.

This is a fast read due to the straightforwardness of the book. It's almost a diary with some background thrown in. I enjoyed it a lot. As far as memoirs go this one might rank right around the middle or slightly higher.

Thanks for writing all this down for us Mr. MacDonald.
GoodLike
To be honest I bought this book because of its low Kindle price and the fact that it was self published. The book started slowly for me but as I dug through the first chapters his writing got traction. I somehow missed his mentioning that he was in Vietnam in 1967; his account of the different places sounded awkwardly familiar. All the fire bases described, Con Thien, Khe Shanh, Rockpile, Hills 881 N&S and 861, and others were places I also "humped" in '67 as a Marine combat cameraman. Gio Linh in Quang Tri was especially poignant since I was wounded there. His account of entering the empty village was particularly vivid and accurate. I was with a reinforced Marine platoon when we were ambushed and suffered heavy casualties. If I didn't know better, McDonald and I may have bumped into each other going to the latrine!

McDonald did a very competent job recounting his tour in Vietnam. I agree that the idealism of fighting for democracy and freedom, helping South Vietnam combat Communism -- all vaporized when the bullets, mortars and artillery rained down. The only thought left in one's panicked mind is survival. Period. "Please God, I promise to go to church every Sunday if you spare me."

The book was a good read. For me personally it was deja vu for me. I could close my eyes and images of places he wrote about would flick on like an old film re-run. Good job. Now, Stephen, were you with the 26th, 9th or 4th Marines? I was at the DaNang Press Center, III MAF.

Semper fi
Welen
I like to read war autobiographers and military history, so I picked up this Amazon purchase on a whim.

MacDonald claims to have a number of typos and mistakes in the book, but there were none that mattered as far as I could tell. (Looses instead of loses, for example.) The narrative is strong and true throughout.

If you want a book version of 'Full Metal Jacket', this is as close as it gets. MacDonald's writing is among the best I've read. I read this book while stationed in Afghanistan, and at the end the author advises passing the book along to someone else if you like it, which I did. I wonder how many soldiers, sailors, marines, and airmen will read it during its tour here!

This is an uncensored narrative of his highlights in Vietnam, as I enjoyed the details of his time in and out of harm's way. When that rude taxi driver drove him home to see his mother after his tour, he knew his war was over. Thanks for sharing it with us.