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by John Ellis

eBook Eye-Deep in Hell: Trench Warfare in World War I download ISBN: 0801839475
Author: John Ellis
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; Reprint edition (September 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1376 kb
Fb2: 1371 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr lrf doc lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

John Ellis’ EYE-DEEP IN HELL provides an excellent detailing of how armies endured almost four years of killing and dying in the bowels of endless, filthy trenches. In only 200 pages, John Ellis tells us all this and more

John Ellis’ EYE-DEEP IN HELL provides an excellent detailing of how armies endured almost four years of killing and dying in the bowels of endless, filthy trenches. Ellis offers readers a rather blunt portrayal of the average infantryman’s experience in the trenches on the Western Front from 1914-1918. In only 200 pages, John Ellis tells us all this and more. We learn what the many different trenches were for, where the soldiers went when they had some down time, what they did there, and what a typical day was like in a front-line trench.

World War, 1914-1918 - Campaigns - Western Front, World War, 1914-1918 - Trench warfare. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press. inlibrary; printdisabled;. Includes bibliographical references (page 207) and index. In the line - The setting - The daily routine - Natural miseries - Guns and gas - Over the top - Patrols and raids - Battle : strategy and tactics - Battle : the reality - The casualties - A lighter side? - - Sustaining the men in the line - Rest and leave - Attitude - Patriotism and honour - Disillusionment and protest.

Eye-Deep In Hell book. John Ellis’ EYE-DEEP IN HELL provides an excellent detailing of how armies endured almost four years of killing and dying in the bowels of endless, filthy trenches.

In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique an. Just For Today get free read 30 days !!! Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I. More than six million died there. In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique and terrifying world?the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death. com/?book 0801839475).

In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique and terrifying world-the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death. ISBN13:9780801839474. Release Date:September 1989.

World War I Military History Books. Johns Hopkins University Press. Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I. In "Eye-Deep in Hell, " the author of the widely acclaimed "Social History of the Machine Gun" explores this unique and terrifying world - the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death.

Quantity in stock: 1. € 1. 8. May have some sunning, foxing, or shelf wear. FREE delivery worldwide! Description for EYE-DEEP IN HELL TRENCH WAREFARE IN WORLD WAR I Hardcover. Used hardback, in good condition, with dustjacket.

Warfare in World War I by John Ellis (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 1976).

Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I.

Trench Warfare in World War I. John Ellis. In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique and terrifying world-the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death.

Details about Eye-Deep in Hell: Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I. More than six million died . Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by Johns Hopkins University Press

Millions of men lived in the trenches during World War I. More than six million died there. In Eye-Deep in Hell, the author explores this unique and terrifying world―the rituals of battle, the habits of daily life, and the constant struggle of men to find meaning amid excruciating boredom and the specter of impending death.

Comments: (7)
Drelahuginn
I'm a history geek and enjoy reading books about world events. This small book gives the reader an insight into the horrors that the front line soldiers - German and allied - experienced on a daily basis. Watching a WWI movie like Sargent York, you might be forgiven for assuming that soldiers engaged in trench warfare wore clean, dry uniforms and fought in dusty trenches. This book describes the muddy, vermin infested, world these brave soldiers lived and died in. The stories of wounded men drowning in mud, finding bodies, abandoned during pitched battles, while expanding trenches, gives the reader a glimpse into their chaotic world of total war. Poison Gas attacks, rats eating the bodies of dead and wounded, trench foot, infections and influenza. These are some of the dangers that the men and women faced on top of the bullets and bombs that were a daily danger. It also gives the reader a sense of the bravery of men who knew they were going to charge trench protected machine gunners but went "over the top" anyway because it was their duty.

The writer does an excellent job of stating the facts without sensationalizing them. My only criticisms - the photographic reproduction of period prints is poor and the author needed a better copy editor because there are quite a few mistakes I'm not used to in published works.

Overall, these do not detract from what is a powerful and informative book.

Recommended for anyone who has an interest in history.
Vrion
While World War I has always been dubbed “The Great War”, it may actually be the “Forgotten War” in terms of how little is remembered of the horrible manner in which it was fought. John Ellis’ EYE-DEEP IN HELL provides an excellent detailing of how armies endured almost four years of killing and dying in the bowels of endless, filthy trenches.

Ellis offers readers a rather blunt portrayal of the average infantryman’s experience in the trenches on the Western Front from 1914-1918. Starting with a basic overview of the inevitable circumstances that led to such static warfare, Ellis begins to meticulously delve into specifics: from trench construction specifics to food and entertainment activities, not to mention combat and death. By chronicling every conceivable facet of life in the trenches, we get a much clearer picture of how terribly miserable, unique and personal the war truly was.

While the book leans to documenting the Allied armies’ trench experience (mainly British and French), almost every topic is countered with a German perspective as well. I found this particularly appealing in that it gave the book a great deal of balance. EYE-DEEP IN HELL is told in a manner that gives readers a comprehensive understanding of how utterly miserable it must have been for the men who experienced life in the trenches. While I had a basic knowledge of trench-warfare, Ellis rendered that knowledge superficial … it was much worse than I had previously thought. Vivid accounts of men living in knee-deep, stagnant water contaminated with human waste and rotting corpses. The men were always wet, cold and hungry; they were exposed to perpetual artillery bombardment and constantly spied-on by enemy snipers eagerly seeking an opportunity to kill any man who briefly and carelessly exposed himself. Even worse were the accounts of wounded men too weak to keep themselves from drowning in the water and mud of their own trenches, the overwhelming, putrid smell of rotting corpses, swarms of flies and an incident where one soldier realized the movement of a corpse in no-man’s land was due to rats feasting on it from within. Ironically, these horrors listed are what men experienced from WITHIN the trenches … “going over the top” (leaving the trenches to attack the enemy) is another ghastly experience all together as men are senselessly ordered to charge point-blank into enemy artillery and machine-gun fire. EYE-DEEP IN HELL provides a well-rounded education in the weaponry, equipment, tactics and wholesale slaughter of Western Front in a brief, but insightful manner.

Readers will readily realize the futility of a war in which men were either sitting ducks in their trenches or charging suicidal into direct enemy fire. EYE-DEEP IN HELL doesn’t ignore detailing how men “cracked” under the circumstances and how others, more amazingly, found ways to endure … entire segments of the book are dedicated to the “attitude” of the men doing the fighting, the methods they used to cope and how technology advancements saved countless lives. Poems, excerpts from letters and an abundance of pictures throughout the book add both a personal and graphic quality that enhances Ellis’ writing.

I was looking for a book to give me a clearer idea of what trench warfare was like and got more than I bargained for with EYE-DEEP IN HELL. I felt that John Ellis’ book provided me an excellent and detailed account of World War I from the ground-level. The book is concise, yet very informative. EYE-DEEP IN HELL has certainly triggered my interest in learning more about the Great War.
Oreavi
If you want to know what life in the trenches during World War I was like, this is the place to turn. You will not learn about the great and terrible battles, or about the generals or the political leaders. Indeed, the author assumes the reader has a basic knowledge of these things. But if you want to know about the almost constant water and mud, the heat, the cold, the hunger, the rats, the corpses all strewn about, the smells, the lack of sleep, the fear, and the blood, this is the book for you. In only 200 pages, John Ellis tells us all this and more. We learn what the many different trenches were for, where the soldiers went when they had some down time, what they did there, and what a typical day was like in a front-line trench. The book contains a large collection of photographs that add to the narration. I found the book both gruesome and compelling.
Cointrius
As I wrote about William Van Der Kloot's `The Lessons of War,' there exists a bountiful basket of `niche' books about the combatants' experiences in World War I and this is another excellent example of the genre. As an assiduous reader of the war's numerous comprehensive histories, I grant you that virtually all of them include extensive treatments of the horrors of the trenches, but also suggest that we sometimes take these descriptions for granted and perhaps have become a bit jaded about these mud holes' singular awfulness in the process. For the more casual reader who doesn't wish to venture too far into the weeds of `then this battle occurred' histories, books like this offer an excellent overview of their chosen subjects, in this case the unique phenomenon of trench life, unprecedented, and never, thank goodness, to be replicated. And to even a devoted World War I buff, Ellis's account is sufficiently well presented to make us reflect anew on the soldiers' virtually unimaginable `eye-deep' life. If you have a friend who's interested in military history but doesn't want to become an overweening bore like you (and me), this would make a very fine gift. Highly recommended.
Gann
Very insightful, and well written (minus a few spelling mistakes throughout). Includes statistics, testimony, and cites doctrine of the day giving you accounts for both sides of the war, from all nations, on all fronts of the war. The pictures are also great quality and put a face to what the author describes.