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eBook Battleship: The Loss of the Prince of Wales and the Repulse download

by Martin and Mahoney Patrick Middlebrook

eBook Battleship: The Loss of the Prince of Wales and the Repulse download ISBN: 0684163330
Author: Martin and Mahoney Patrick Middlebrook
Publisher: Scribner; Book Club edition (November 1979)
Language: English
ePub: 1152 kb
Fb2: 1245 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: History
Subcategory: Military

Martin Middlebrook and Patrick Mahoney present a very detailed and . This book covers the story of the HMS Prince of Wales and the HMS Repulse from their arrival in the pacific in late 1941.

As usual, Middlebrook provides excellent background information on the key individuals, the ships themselves, their mission and the circumstances of their deployment to Singapore. Unfortunately, the battleships arrived in Singapore on 2 December 1941 and Japan attacked only six days later. The deterrence function of the warships was thus a failure.

British military historian and author Martin Middlebrook speaks on a tour of a cemetery where war dead from the Somme are buried. Battleship: the loss of the Prince of Wales and the Repulse (with Patrick Mahoney) (1977). The Kaiser's Battle with much co-operation from Neville Mackinder.

Middlebrook, Martin, 1932-. Prince of Wales (Battleship), Repulse (Battle cruiser), World War, 1939-1945 - Naval operations, Japanese, World War, 1939-1945 - Pacific Ocean. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station09. cebu on March 8, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

On Wednesday, December 10, 1941, two British battleships were sunk off Malaya by a Japanese air torpedo attack. They did not request the air support that could have saved them. 840 men died, and the survivors have not forgotten. This is the story of this torpedo attack. Penguin Books LTD. ISBN-10.

Martin Middlebrook (born 1932) is a British military historian and Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

The authors have gone to great trouble to seek out and interview survivors whose testimonies bring this tragic chapter in our sea history to life. Martin Middlebrook (born 1932) is a British military historian and Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. Books by Martin Middlebrook.

Patrick Mahoney, Martin Middlebrook

Patrick Mahoney, Martin Middlebrook. They had not requested the air support that could have saved them and 840 men died in the battleship HMS Prince of Wales and the battle cruiser HMS Repulse. The authors re-create for the reader not only what happened, but also what it was like for the men involved.

by Patrick Mahoney and Martin Middlebrook.

Bibliography: p. Includes index.

They had not requested the air support that could have saved them and 840 men died in the battleship HMS Prince of Wales and the battle cruiser HMS Repulse. They dispose of several myths to explain the events of those confused hours, and address the uncertainty, controversy and strong emotions that surrounded the militarily disastrous sinkings.

Middlebrook wrote his first book The First Day on the Somme (1971) following a visit to the First World War battlefields of France and Belgium in 1967. This is a detailed study of the single worst day for the British Army. Middlebrook gave the same single-day treatment to 21 March 1918, the opening of the German Spring Offensive, in The Kaiser's Battle. Battleship: the loss of the Prince of Wales and the Repulse (with Patrick Mahoney) (1977) ISBN 0713910429. 1978) ISBN 071391081X.

This is an account of one particular wartime naval action.
Comments: (7)
Moogugore
On December 10, 1941, the British battleships HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse were sunk off the coast of Malaya by Japanese torpedo aircraft. This was the first time in history that a modern, well-armed dreadnought had been sunk on the high seas by aircraft alone. The destruction of these two battleships with such apparent ease seemed to justify the pre-war prophecies of aviation advocates such as "Billy" Mitchell and to signal the end of the battleship era. Martin Middlebrook and Patrick Mahoney present a very detailed and balanced account of this significant naval action and they attempt to assess its historical impact.
As usual, Middlebrook provides excellent background information on the key individuals, the ships themselves, their mission and the circumstances of their deployment to Singapore. Strategically, these ships were ordered by Winston Churchill to the Far East to help deter the coming war with Japan. Admiral Phillips, a high level staff officer with an understanding of war plans, was given charge of the squadron and tasked with a deterrence mission. Unfortunately, the battleships arrived in Singapore on 2 December 1941 and Japan attacked only six days later. The deterrence function of the warships was thus a failure.
Much of the book then focuses on Admiral Phillips controversial decision to sortie from Singapore in an attempt to find and destroy the Japanese invasion convoys bound for Malaya. Phillips went charging off into a very uncertain situation with only two battleships and four destroyers. He apparently believed that his magnificent warships could fight their way through to smash the Japanese convoys, while suffering acceptable levels of damage. Only a minimal effort was made to coordinate with the Royal Air Force for fighter cover prior to the sortie; a fighter squadron was dedicated to supporting the battleships but given no specific instructions.
Prior to this account, I had always believed that the battleships were sunk rather easily by a well-coordinated Japanese air attack. In fact, the Japanese squadrons were low on fuel and disordered, the attacks conducted piece-meal. HMS Repulse did a superb job dodging about nineteen torpedoes before receiving fatal hits. On the other hand, the much better-built HMS Prince of Wales was crippled early in the fight by a lucky torpedo hit that caused massive flooding and knocked out most of her electrical systems. The Japanese achieved 11 torpedo hits out of 49 launched and 2 bomb hits of 23 dropped. Just as the Prince of Wales was sinking, ten British fighters arrived over the scene. Admiral Phillips had never radioed for air support and this squadron only arrived due to the independent call for assistance by HMS Repulse. Middlebrook notes that had Phillips called for these fighters just two hours earlier, they could have disrupted the unescorted Japanese bombers and probably have helped save at least one of the battleships.
The main culprit for this disaster is Admiral Phillips. Middlebrook asserts that, "throughout the operation, Phillips continued to show a disregard, almost a contempt, for the dangers of any type of air attack" and, "Phillips was confident that his ships could defend themselves and that he was determined not to ask for the help of another service." Finally, "two great ships and many good men were lost because one stubborn old sea-dog refused to acknowledge that he had been wrong." However, despite this focus on the inter-service bickering as the main culprit of the disaster, the authors then go on to pass judgment on battleships as a whole. After this disaster they assert, battleships were little more than "floating artillery" that could only operate under conditions of friendly air superiority.
Qag
A very well documented treatise on this sad, unnecessary tragedy.
Najinn
Unfortunately this 32 year old paperback fell apart when I started to read it. I am not sure what
"good condition" means in this context.
Shakagul
This book was first published in 1977 under a different title and, in 1979, provided me with almost all the background information I required in order to plan an advanced diving expedition to visit the remains of these two great ships off the Malaysian coast. In the event that expedition never took place but, in later years, I made the mistake of lending that book to someone with the same idea. It is a measure of how outstanding this book "is" that I still regret having made that loan - simply because it was never returned.

Three days after the infamous events of Pearl Harbour on 7 December 1941, HMS Prince of Wales (a 2 year old 35,000 ton Battleship) and HMS Repulse (a 25 year old Battlecruiser of 26,500 tons) with 4 Destroyer escorts sallied forth from Singapore as "Force Z" without air support. Their Aircraft Carrier HMS Indomitable had run aground outside Kingston Harbour a short time before sailing to join and had to proceed to the USA for repairs to her hull. With the events of Pearl Harbour not yet analysed and understood - i.e. airpower vs. sea power, Force Z was still thought to be more than a match for anything the Japanese might throw at them.

They were very wrong and when the attacks did commence it was all over rather quickly. Two valuable capital ships were sunk with the loss of 840 lives. What happened that day has led to many questions being asked about the conduct of those senior naval officers involved.

In an overwhelmingly authoritative account, these authors have accessed not only British records from WW2 but also Japanese records from the same period and even those from the naval dockyards of Norfolk, Virginia were the repairs to HMS Indomitable were logged as task No S.139.

I am delighted to have a copy of this book back on my bookshelf and if anyone else missed it first time around, now is the time to treat yourself to an excellent account of one of the Royal Navy's greatest wartime disasters which is written in an exciting and compelling way.

Better than any work of fiction.

NM
Cells
This book covers the story of the HMS Prince of Wales and the HMS Repulse from their arrival in the pacific in late 1941. It starts by covering the decisions which led to these ships being sent to the Far East despite a still viable German navy, then discusses the ships themselves, their crews, and their histories.
The book is written in a narrative style and makes heavy use of actual messages radioed to and from the vessels. These do an effective job of establishing the situation and give the reader insight into why certain decisions were made. Also used are official Japanese documents so the reader gets a view of the battle from both sides.
Diagrams of the ships show the locations of bomb and torpedo hits. During the interludes between air raids, the author covers the damage inflicted thus far in an almost checklist manner: pumps, counter flooding procedures, communication status, ventilation and lighting, steering, anti-aircraft armament... I can almost picture the officers taking account of what they have to work with and forming plans on how to prepare for the next assault.
After the sinkings, the remaining chapters cover the rescue of the crews and an analysis of the battle and its aftermath. Overall it's an easy read and presents an interesting view of a battle which was one of the first to prove Billy Mitchell right.