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eBook Seizing the Enigma : The Race to Break the German U-Boat Codes 1939-1943 (10 1 1/2 cassettes) download

by David Kahn

eBook Seizing the Enigma : The Race to Break the German U-Boat Codes 1939-1943 (10 1 1/2 cassettes) download ISBN: 0786106530
Author: David Kahn
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged LIBRARY edition (February 1, 1995)
Language: English
ePub: 1865 kb
Fb2: 1618 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr lrf doc lit
Category: History
Subcategory: Military

Frontline Books, London.

Frontline Books, London. It depicts the codebreakers, especially those working on the naval Enigma, behind their closed doors and relates case histories of the role of the decodes in the defeat of the U-boats. It focuses upon personalities and rests as much as possible upon primary sources, namely documents and interviews. It shows how much of a near-run thing the cryptologic battle was and seeks to explain why the Allies won it.

David Kahn is the world’s leading historian of cryptology and the author of The Codebreakers. This 1998 book is a reissue of the 1991 book. Its 336 pages has a Contents, 23 chapters, Notes, Bibliography, and Index. It is a history of WW II’s Battle of the Atlantic (Preface).

A multinational corps of cryptologists struggled to break the German U-boat codes that were helping Nazi submarine .

A multinational corps of cryptologists struggled to break the German U-boat codes that were helping Nazi submarine wolfpacks tear at the lifeline between America and Britain. Several daring captures at sea of critical documents and encryption machines by the Royal Navy finally led to mastering the U-boat codes

Seizing The Enigma book.

Seizing The Enigma book. In this book, cryptologist David Kahn recounts the story of the dramatic race between codemakers and codebreakers, focusing on the personalities involved, describing the at-sea captures of encryption keys that led to the Allied breakthrough, and depicting the enormous impact this information had on the most cataclysmic war in history.

Here, the author brings to life the race to break the German U-boat codes. As the Battle of the Atlantic raged, Hitler’s U-boats reigned. To combat the growing crisis, ingenious amateurs joined the nucleus of dedicated professionals at Bletchley Park to unlock the continually changing German naval codes.

For almost four desperate years between 1939 and 1943, British and American navies fought a savage, losing battle .

For almost four desperate years between 1939 and 1943, British and American navies fought a savage, losing battle against German submarine wolf packs. The Allies might never have turned the tide of that historic battle without an intelligence coup.

2307/1985821 oceedings{Kahn1991SeizingTE, title {Seizing the Enigma: The .

Seizing the Enigma: The Race to Break the German U-Boat Codes, 1939-1943. oceedings{Kahn1991SeizingTE, title {Seizing the Enigma: The Race to Break the German U-Boat Codes, 1939-1943}, author {David Kahn}, year {1991} }. David Kahn. The inside story of the ingenious code-breaking and naval exploits that led to the defeat of Hitler's submarine wolf packs-by a renowned, bestselling intelligence authority. The moves and countermoves in this great naval battle have all the tension of The Hunt for Red October but on the larger scale of true history.

Publisher: Barnes & Noble Books ISBN 13: 9780760708637. Title: Seizing the Enigma: The Race to Break the German U-Boat Codes, 19 Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. Read full description. Seizing Enigma Race to Break German U-boat Codes 1939-1943 by David Kahn. Pre-owned: lowest price. All listings for this product.

6 - Failure at Broadway Buildings 8 - Phantoms 9 - The Rotors 10 - Royal .

In this case that has been achieved by focusing on one particular code - the German Navy’s version of the Enigma code, while proved to be rather harder to crack than the Army or Luftwaffe versions, partly because the Navy made fewer mistakes that allowed the code breakers in and partly for technical reasons.

[This is the Audiobook CASSETTE Library Edition in vinyl case.][Read by Bernard Mayes] For almost four desperate years between 1939 and 1943, British and American navies fought a savage, losing battle against German submarine wolf packs. The Allies might never have turned the tide of that historic battle without an intelligence coup. The race to break the German U-boat codes is one of the last great untold stories of World War II. David Kahn, the world's leading historian of cryptology, brings to life this tense, behind-the-scenes drama for the first time. Seizing the Enigma provides the definitive account of how British and American code breakers fought a war of wits against Nazi naval communications and helped lead the Allies to victory in the crucial Battle of the Atlantic.
Comments: (4)
Unde
"Seizing the Enigma" is a very informative book but a very tedious read. There are IMHO several reasons.
1. The author paints a big picture, the background for the story. I guess it meant to provide readers with a certain ambiance. Great, but (a) the picture is way too wide and (b) the level of details on the edges of the picture is as high as elsewhere. The reader ends up filling his memory with totally superfluous details, the majority of which is a complete imagination.
2. Not everyone wants to know how different modifications of Enigma worked. These people will be tortured by having to read some details of the machine and cryptanalysis. But those, who like me, wanted to have a clear understanding of Enigma's inner-working will get just an illusion of that. It is a difficult task to satisfy everyone, so IMO in this case no one will be happy.
Katius
Seizing the Enigma

David Kahn is the world’s leading historian of cryptology and the author of “The Codebreakers”. This 1998 book is a reissue of the 1991 book. Its 336 pages has a Contents, 23 chapters, Notes, Bibliography, and Index. It is a history of WW II’s Battle of the Atlantic (Preface). The Allies won because they intercepted, solved, and read the coded messages sent to Hitler’s U-boats. The convoy system brought food, military supplies, and raw materials to Britain and returned with money-earning goods to her allies (Chapter 1). The British were able to read German Naval codes in WW I (Chapter 2). The Enigma machine was adopted by the German military (Chapter 3). Mathematical cryptanalysts solved the Enigma machine encipherment (Chapter 4). Poland’s cryptographers developed a machine to decipher the Enigma (Chapter 5).

The British efforts to decipher foreign codes are noted in Chapter 6. A German U-boat was sunk and the British recovered two of the eight rotors (Chapter 8). Ships were sunk because of a failure to warn of a German flotilla (p.122). A raid on occupied Norway recovered secret documents and two rotors (Chapter 10). The Germans used civilian trawlers to get weather information (Chapter 12). One was attacked and some papers were captured along with an Enigma machine (Chapter 13). This was repeated (Chapter 14). The amount of losses were barely affected, there were other factors (Chapter 15). The Germans also broke the British codes and were able to sink more ships (Chapter 16). The German four-rotor reduced solutions (Chapter 17).

Sinking a U-boat and capturing its documents led to deciphering messages and avoiding sinking of convoys (Chapter 18). The US Army worked with the British (Chapter 19). They ordered detours to avoid U-boat positions. Chapter 20 tells about one convoy, SC127, of 57 ships. Operations Research was used in planning convoys (p.248). Increased losses of U-boats led to their reduction in the North Atlantic (Chapter 21). The capture of a U-boat by an American taskforce allowed reading German messages. After June 1943 no merchant ship was lost in the North Atlantic (p.264). Escort carriers allowed attacking U-boat supply submarines (Chapter 22). This won the Battle of the Atlantic (p.275). Chapter 23 explains the benefits of ULTRA: it allowed more efficient operations. It tells why the democracies were more efficient than a dictatorship.

This book is a history of the codebreaking that won the Battle of the Atlantic which went on for most of WW II and saved time and lives. Some parts on the technical details of the Enigma machines may be less interesting to readers and skipped.
Lanin
`Nothing like the Hollywood version at all' is this exceedingly well researched account of the true story of capturing the first Enigma machine. This work is so detailed that we are even treated to the thoughts of Commander Joe Baker-Cresswell RN who, at a crucial moment when poised to ram U 110, remembered how the Russians recovered a code book from a German cruiser grounded in the Baltic during WW1 and how that book was used to decode German messages throughout that earlier conflict. Wondering whether or not he was about to destroy a similar find, he ordered full astern just in time to avoid the intended collision, sent over a boarding party and was responsible for the capture of the first Enigma cipher machine of the War. In so doing he made one of the most valuable contributions to the eventual Allied victory.

Rarely have I enjoyed such a fascinating read and it says much for the outstanding way in which detailed, technical research is combined with sheer readability that this important historical work reads better than most novels. In order to provide the reader with a taste of what I mean, Baker-Cresswell and U 110 are introduced in the first two paragraphs of Page 1 where the author skilfully begins to set the scene for their historic encounter. By page 7 one is the officer commanding No 3 escort group charged with protecting a convoy from U Boat attack and the other is attacking that convoy. By Page 16 the badly damaged U 110 is forced to the surface where her crew abandon ship. Only now is Baker-Cresswell mindful of the grounding of the Magdeburg.

Pausing there, we are then treated to a full account of the grounding of that German cruiser in 1914 and the resultant effects of her captured documents. The next chapters are then devoted to a history of codes and the evolution of various devices used by different powers in trying to protect their secrets. Post-WW1, this led to ever more sophisticated means with equally refined counter-measures and straightforward spying. I found it fascinating to learn which countries were most proficient at breaking which other country's codes. All seemed to have different proficiencies.

Eventually the first British dedicated department for such activities was established and went on to become Bletchley Park. It was also interesting to learn of the type of genius they employed - mathematicians, linguists, scientists and even chess players all seemed to fit the bill.

It is not, therefore, until we reach Page 189 that the story of Baker-Cresswell's confrontation with U 110 continues and, as it does so, we are also treated to the minutiae of detail, the food, cigarettes and personal items found on that U Boat in addition to the sheer quantity of those items of far greater importance.

And so the story continues in what is, as I say, an immensely readable accounts of how the first Enigma was seized and of the vital role it played during WW2.

Altogether one of the finest works I have ever read and, as someone who spends considerable time immersed in research, I congratulate the author on an excellent job of work.

NM
Damdyagab
David Kahn's Seizing the Enigma is a detailed effort to tell the story of how the German naval code was broken. Though that intelligence breakthrough of WWII is widely known, little is known of how complicated the effort was. It required the effort of brilliant mathematicians working the theoretical side and the bravado of British naval and intelligence officers who literally risked their lives to obtain the information and equipment needed to crack the code. Kahn gives a very detailed story and it is at times a bit thick and difficult to follow. This is only because the theory behind the enigma was so complex and a complete history of the saga requires at least some examination of the intriguing, yet, sometimes confusing mathematical concepts. In all, a good read. John Kidd