carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Style in history (McGraw-Hill paperbacks)

eBook Style in history (McGraw-Hill paperbacks) download

by Peter Gay

eBook Style in history (McGraw-Hill paperbacks) download ISBN: 0070230633
Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: McGraw-Hill (1976)
Language: English
Pages: 241
ePub: 1189 kb
Fb2: 1425 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: txt doc docx mobi
Category: History
Subcategory: Historical Study and Educational Resources

Series: McGraw-Hill Paperbacks. Paperback: 142 pages .

Series: McGraw-Hill Paperbacks. ISBN-10: 0070503982 . she also bought me this one.

Style in History book. Thus, for Peter Gay, style is the key to culture, and the truth of history-as it helps to define that cul What does an historian’s style reveal? In this original and lucid guide to the proper reading of Gibbon, Ranke, Macaulay, and Burckhardt-great historians who were also great stylists-Peter Gay demonstrates that, style is an invaluable clue to the historian's insight.

Rudolph de Harak’s McGraw-Hill paperback design is considered one of his best works, where he created . Its clear with each book cover, he has tried to use simple but abstract imagery which represents the contents of the book.

Rudolph de Harak’s McGraw-Hill paperback design is considered one of his best works, where he created over 350 individual covers in 1960 for a variety of different subjects for the Educational Boo.

Style in History (Paperback). In this original and lucid guide to the proper reading of Gibbon, Ranke, Macaulay, and Burckhardt-great historians who were also great stylists-Peter Gay demonstrates that, style is an invaluable clue to the historian's insight. Paperback 256 Pages, Published: 26/04/1989. Thus, for Peter Gay, style is the key to culture, and the "truth" of history-as it helps to define that culture-can only be fully understood through an objective and thorough analysis of all its elements. Publisher: WW Norton & Co ISBN: 9780393305586 Number of pages: 256 Weight: 220 g Dimensions: 191 x 130 x 18 mm.

Peter Gay (born June 20, 1923), is a Jewish American historian of the social history of ideas, born as. .Gay's first interest was in intellectual history

Peter Gay (born June 20, 1923), is a Jewish American historian of the social history of ideas, born as Peter Joachim Fröhlich in Berlin, where he was educated at the Goethe-Gymnasium. After witnessing Kristallnacht in 1938, he fled Nazi Germany in 1939. His family initially booked passage on the SS "St. Louis" (whose passengers were eventually denied visas) but fortuitously changed their booking to an earlier voyage to Cuba. Gay's first interest was in intellectual history. His 1959 book, "Voltaire's Politics" examined Voltaire as a politician and how his politics influenced the ideas that Voltaire championed in his writings.

Thus, for Peter Gay, style is the key to culture, and the "truth" of history-as it helps to define that culture-can only be fully understood through an objective and thorough analysis of all its elements. Style in history Peter Gay Snippet view - 1974. References to this book.

McGraw-Hill is a learning science company and one of the "big three" educational publishers that provides customized educational content, software, and services for pre-K through postgraduate education. The company also provides reference and trade publications for the medical, business, and engineering professions.

Paperback £1. 9; ISBN 978-007-254115-1. Volume 3 Issue 1 - Thomas Bender. Discover more publications, questions and projects in World History. Oceans in world history By Rainer F. Buschmann. Explorations in world history. February 2008 · Journal of Global History.

Peter Gay, "Style in History". Robert D. Schulzinger - 1976 - History and Theory 15 (1):94. Peter Burke - 2004 - Polity Press. A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History. Manuel De Landa - 1997 - Zone Books. A History of History J. T. Shotwell: The History of History. The Interpretation of History. Joseph Reese Strayer (e. - 1943 - Princeton: Princeton University Press. World History: The Basics. Peter N. Stearns - 2010 - Routledge. Sartre and Clio: Encounters with History. New York: Columbia University Press (London: Milford), 1939.

Style in history (McGraw-Hill paperbacks) [paperback] Peter Gay [Jan 01, 1976]
Comments: (2)
MilsoN
This is a brilliant, entertaining, informative and discursive set of four essays on four historians (Gibbon, Macaulay, Ranke and Burckhardt -- his heart lies with the last one). It is full of good judgment, wit and warmth. It is not a "guide" to anything, but rather like a marvelous after dinner talk by a gentleman historian of the old school, a master speaking to strongly-educated amateurs of history. Highly recommended. The Burckhardt chapter is perhaps the best introduction to Burckhardt in English, and I hope it will send readers to the great man of Basle (so wrongly blamed for Nietzsche, himself so wrongly blamed for Hitler). (Fwiw, I found Gay's Enlightenment books brilliantly written, but -- I'm not sure how to describe the flaw -- SO well-written, SO packed with information, and SO discursive, that for me, the souffle fell.)
Zaryagan
Peter Gay Style in History (1974, New York: W.W. Norton & Co., paperback edn., 1988)
Peter Gay is one of our preeminent authorities about cultural history, and professionals historians in all fields can learn much from both the substance and style of his oeuvre. In particular, this thin book, principally essays about the style of four renowned historians of earlier times - Edward Gibbon (1737-94), Leopold von Ranke (1795-1886), Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800-59), and Jacob Burckhardt (1818-97) - is a treasury of observations about the historian's craft. According to Gay, "style" means both the literary devices employed by the historian, as well as his or her "tone of voice." Gay addresses both, and more, while cautioning that the historian is "under pressure to become a stylist while remaining a scientist."
The back cover states that this book is a "guide to the proper reading of Gibbon, Ranke, Macaulay, and Burckhardt," but I found it more descriptive than prescriptive. Indeed, Gay expressly intended these essays to stimulate "debate over the definition of history." According to Gay, style is a function of both nature and nurture. It is "in part a gift of talent," but it also can be learned. For the aspiring historian who looks to Gay's four masters for guidance, many of his observations are profound. For instance, in discussing the belief of both Gibbon and Tacitus, the Roman historian who was one of Gibbon's principal sources, that "the supreme task of the historian [is] to probe historical actors to their depth," Gay concludes: "The chief use of the historian's penetration...[is] to dig beneath appearance to reality." Gay reports that Gibbon imagined himself, like Tacitus, to be a philosophical historian. (Gibbon believed that "the philosopher is a man who has conquered prejudices and given the critical spirit free play.") With regard to style, Gibbon employed a large arsenal of literary device, and Gay praises him for using irony, observing that, in Gibbon's writing, "gravity and levity coexisted without strain." Gay describes as "stunning" the economy with which Ranke wrote and praises his gifts of "speed, color, variety, freshness of diction, and superb control." According to Gay, Ranke believed that "self-imposed discipline alone brings excellence to all art." For instance, the one-sentence paragraph was one of Ranke's trademarks. Ranke is often credited with being the father of "scientific history," but, as Gay notes, Ranke approached his craft "as a branch of the storytelling art." In championing scientific history, Ranke extolled "the systematizing of research, the withdrawal of ego from presentation, the unremitting effort of objectivity, the submission of results to critical public scrutiny." Indeed, according to Gay: "Ranke's contribution to historical science...lay in his exalted view of documents." Furthermore, Gay offers the insight that Ranke "recognized that history is a progressive discipline." Ranke claimed "his own work was superior to that of his predecessors," but he also recognized that his greatest achievements eventually would be superseded by more modern scholarship. In contrast to Ranke's economic style, Gay subtitles his chapter on Macaulay "Intellectual Voluptuary" (borrowing the phrase from Macaulay, himself). Gay reports that Macaulay has been criticized as "verbose, artificial, and overemphatic," and Gay acknowledges other faults including "rhetorical self-indulgence," and "a failure of restraint and of taste." But these criticisms did not prevent Macaulay from becoming a member of "England's intellectual aristocracy." According to Gay, expansiveness and anxiety were the "essential qualities that make up Macaulay's temper and inform Macaulay's style." In discussing Burckhardt, Gay notes that the "historian's choice of subject...is a deeply emotional affair." According to Gay, in Burckhardt's masterpiece, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, his "personal voice is...highly audible and wholly apologetic," and his judgments are "cool." Gay notes that The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy is a "work of diligent research and meticulous construction." Burckhardt's used irony sparingly in comparison with Gbbon, but Burckhardt's the section entitled "The State as a Work of Art," is, as Gay observes correctly, in fact "an animated chamber of horrors." For Burckhardt, Gay concludes: "Style...is the bridge to substance." To Burckhardt, according to Gay, poetry and history - as art and science - are "allies, almost inseparable twins."
This book is not, strictly speaking, comparative intellectual biography, but are there any similarities in the subjects of Gay's essays? Gay defines "modern times" as beginning in the 1890s, and, of the four historians whose style he studies, three - Gibbon, Ranke, and Macaulay - died in the pre-modern era, and Burckhardt survived only into its first decade. In addition, I must raise one additional issue: Gibbon, Macaulay, and Burckhardt were lifelong bachelors, and Ranke did not marry until he was 48. Are we to view this as mere coincidence? I don't think so. As the author of a superb biography of Sigmund Freud, I am surprised that Gay did not devote at least a few lines of insight, in addition to his remark that Gibbon sought to hide a "professional bachelor's conflicts," to the tantalizing fact that three of the four great historian-stylists he studies never married and the other was well into middle age when he did so. Gay clearly believes that style matters in the writing of history, but I believe at least one succinct rule is clear: When in doubt, leave the stylistic flourish out. This leads me to this point: I cannot recommend Gay more enthusiastically because he is both a great historian and a wonderful stylist, which is remarkable for the fact that German, not English, was his native language. As an introduction to his writings, I suggest Gay's My German Question : Growing Up in Nazi Berlin, in which moments of humor leaven penetrating personal recollections of coming of age early in the era of Hitler's tyranny. After Gay's memoirs, the general reader may want to tackle some of his scholarly books, such as the biographies of Mozart and Freud, his superb studies of the Enlightenment, or this wonderful book, Style in History. And a few may even be motivated to read (or re-read) Gibbon, Ranke, Macaulay, and Burckhardt.