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eBook Women, Work And Sexual Politics In Eighteenth-Century England (Women's and Gender History) download

by Bridget Hill

eBook Women, Work And Sexual Politics In Eighteenth-Century England (Women's and Gender History) download ISBN: 1857282132
Author: Bridget Hill
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 18, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1736 kb
Fb2: 1121 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit lrf mbr docx
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Women, Work & Sexual Politics in Eighteenth-Century England. Bridget Irene Hill, historian, taught at Oxford and the Open University, wrote books and articles on Women's History, was married to the historian Christopher Hill. Books by Bridget Hill.

Women, Work & Sexual Politics in Eighteenth-Century England.

In this fundamental reassessment of women's experience of work in eighteenth-century England, Bridget Hill .

However, the work is somewhat unorganized in that chapters often show no relationship to others and little attempt to relate gender roles to economics, beyond discussions of the declining family economy.

Hill's other works included Eighteenth Century Women: an Anthology (1984); Women, Work and Sexual Politics in Eighteenth-Century England (1989); Servants: English Domestics in the Eighteenth Century (1996), and Women Alone: Spinsters in England, 1660-1850 (2001).

Medical Men, Women of Letters, and Treatments for Eighteenth-Century Hysteria. Moral Discourse and Cultural Politics in Early Eighteenth-Century England. Heather Meek - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (1):1-14. Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex. Linda Lemoncheck - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):369-373. Joseph Priestley's Time Charts: The Use and Teaching of History by Rational Dissent in Late Eighteenth-Century England. Beverley Southgate - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (2):181-182.

Hill's book details eighteenth-century sexual politics of work, that is, the way . Women's work in the seventeenth century had been characterized by "multi-occupational nature," .

Women, Work and Sexual Politics in Eighteenth-Century England is beautifully crafted. women turned their hands to whatever work was necessary and presented itself.

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July 31, 2010 History. found in the catalog. Women, work, and sexual politics in eighteenth-century England. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Women, work, and sexual politics in eighteenth-century England from your list? Women, work, and sexual politics in eighteenth-century England. Published 1989 by B. Blackwell in Oxford, UK, New York, NY, USA.

pornography, women’s and gender history speaks of the increasing repression of women as . Novel genders: women writing women in the eighteenth century introduction.

pornography, women’s and gender history speaks of the increasing repression of women as a. new modernity swept old social negotiations aside.

The author offers a reassessment of how women's experience of work in 18th- century England was affected by industrialization and other elements of economic, social and technological change.; This study focuses on the household, the most important unit of production in the 18th century. Hill examines the work done by the women of the household, not only in "housework" but also in agriculture and manufacturing, and explains what women lost as the household's independence as a unit of economic production was undermined.; Considering the whole range of activities in which women were involved - including many occupations unrecorded in censuses which have, therefore, been largely ignored by historians - Hill charts the increasing sexual division of labour and highlights its implications. She also discusses the role of service in husbandry and apprenticeship, as sources of training for women, and the consequences of their decline.; The final part of the book considers how the changing nature of women's work influenced courtship, marriage and relations between the sexes. Among the topics discussed are the importance of the women's contribution to setting up and maintaining a household; labouring women's attitudes to marriage and divorce and the customary alternatives to them; and the role of spinsters and widows. The author concludes by asking to what extent the industrial revolution improved the overall position of women and the opportunities open to them.; This series aims to re-establish women's history, and to challenge the assumptions of much mainstream history. Focusing on the modern period and encouraging perspectives from other disciplines, it seeks to concentrate upon areas of focal importance in the history of Britain and continental Europe.; Bridget Hill is the author of "Eighteenth-Century Women: An Anthology" and "The First English Feminist".
Comments: (2)
ladushka
In a subject that has not been breached within the last seventy years, Bridget Hill brings new light to the debate of women's role within England during the 18th century through her Women, Work, and Sexual Politics in Eighteen-Century England. In this synthesis, Hill both confirms and extends Ivy Pinchbeck's Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850 (1930) view of the preindustrial world of England as a golden age of female access to training and productive work destroyed by industrialization and utilizes Pinchbeck's ideas and new scholarly research to bring together women's and social history.

Hill strives to answer the question of how women lived through industrialization, what was lost and gained and as a basis of her analysis, "looked at women's contributions to unpaid but valuable household activities and at female wage earning in both agricultural work and household production within the context of long-term and uneven early industrial change."1 Found within this work are chapters on women's work within the family economy, how it was underminded, husband-wife relations within the home, housework and domestic service, ignored and invisible occupations, courtship, marriage and widowhood.

The Industrial Revolution seen in England was a regionally diverse process but by emphasizing the degrees of household life, Hill crosses social lines with ease in relating women of all castes. In a shift towards industrialization, an increase in sexual division of labor was seen, which denied women admission to particular training, apprenticeships and wages forcing them into domestic service and relying heavily on husbands in the labor force. In a feminist stance, Hill concludes that "the opportunity for productive work" (p. 262) bestows a level playing field to both genders, and adamantly defends "the household was the most important unit of production, and encompassed an economy in which by far the greater part of the work of women was carried out" (p. 4) Showing the relationship between personal and economic aspects of women's lives, both women's work and their importance to their families and households are throughout.

Hill's work in Women, Work and Sexual Politics is well documented and throughly researched offering a substantial contribution to this subfield in European history. However, the work is somewhat unorganized in that chapters often show no relationship to others and little attempt to relate gender roles to economics, beyond discussions of the declining family economy. Additionally, the title of the book is somewhat deceiving in that no sexual politics are present. Hill completely omits prostitution in her discussion of a time when this profession was chosen by some and had an obvious bearing on both the family unit and economy. "Hill's conclusion that the substitution of domestic service for agricultural work represented a decline in women's economic status"2 and the gradual demise of the family economy. Women, Work and Sexual Politics in Eighteenth-Century England is an historical testament to the affects of industrialization on the family unit and economy but also the creation of the traditional roles of both men and women.
Delaath
This is Bridget Hill's approach to eighteenth-century history. Her main focus is to expand on the changes in historical ideas that have happened since the groundbreaking writing of Ivy Pinchbeck (around the 1920s I think). Her organization is good but the writing was on the dry side for my taste. Her focus on the changes in laws about common use of land and the "agricultural revolution" as opposed to the "industrial revolution" have a fairly clear Marxist slant. This view is also found in much of the work of her husband, Christopher Hill.