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by John Lothrop Motley

eBook The Rise of the Dutch Republic - Volume 3 download ISBN: 159605199X
Author: John Lothrop Motley
Publisher: Cosimo Classics (January 1, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 380
ePub: 1520 kb
Fb2: 1953 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt doc rtf azw
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

John Lothrop Motley (April 15, 1814 – May 29, 1877) was an American author, best known for his two popular histories The Rise of the Dutch Republic and The United Netherlands

John Lothrop Motley (April 15, 1814 – May 29, 1877) was an American author, best known for his two popular histories The Rise of the Dutch Republic and The United Netherlands. He was also a diplomat, who helped to prevent European intervention on the side of the Confederates in the American Civil War. . Motley was born on April 15, 1814 in Dorchester, Massachusetts.

Motley is the premier historian of early Dutch history. The Dutch would not finally free themselves from Spain until 1648, hence the term The Eighty Years War. Although this is the "student" version it is extremely detailed and brings the Dutch quest for independence to life. His characterization of William the Silent ranks with C. V. Wedgwood's classic biography. The second volume closes at the end of 1574, the third with the Death of William of Orange. Who must be likened to our own George Washington.

John Lothrop Motley, from the Preface Motley spent five years in Dresden, Brussels, and the Hague to produce, in 1856, this popular three-volume history hailed by readers of the time and recognized by scholars since as a standard of the field. The lessons for modern society Motley finds in the microcosm of Holland continue to hold true in today's uncertain political environment, and his dramatic narrative and eloquent, lyrical prose remain a delight

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Authors: Motley John Lothrop. Categories: Fiction Science Fiction. 9/10 3. /10 Your: Rate.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

History of Protestantism in the Netherlands: Book 18. James Aitken Wylie.

The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Volume IV of VI). Edward Gibbon. History Of The United Netherlands, 1598. The Origin and Deeds of the Goths. History of Protestantism in the Netherlands: Book 18. Beacon Lights Of History, Volume VIII. History of the Reign of Philip the Second, King of Spain, Vols.

Books Book details, The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History. Publication year: 1880. Volume: 3. Contributors: John Lothrop Motley.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History. The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3. By John Lothrop Motley. Read FREE! The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. Publisher: Harper and Brothers. Place of publication: New York. The lessons for modern society Motley finds in the microcosm of Holland continue to hold true in today's uncertain political environment, and his dramatic narrative and eloquent, lyrical prose remain a delight

Gutenberg) and to ask . 5 for it is in my opinion unethical and deceptive.

The Rise of the Dutch Republic Tracklist. The Rise of the Dutch Republic, Volume I Preface Lyrics. About The Rise of the Dutch Republic. The Rise of the Dutch Republic Q&A. J. John Lothrop Motley. The Rise of the Dutch Republic.

To the Dutch Republic, even more than to Florence at an earlier day, is the world indebted for practical instruction in that great science of political equilibrium which must always become more and more important as the various states of the civilized world are pressed more closely together, and as the struggle for pre-eminence becomes more feverish and fatal. -John Lothrop Motley, from the Preface Motley spent five years in Dresden, Brussels, and the Hague to produce, in 1856, this popular three-volume history hailed by readers of the time and recognized by scholars since as a standard of the field. The lessons for modern society Motley finds in the microcosm of Holland continue to hold true in today's uncertain political environment, and his dramatic narrative and eloquent, lyrical prose remain a delight. The author's respect for the people of the Netherlands and their triumphs as a nation still shines through, and this love letter to the Dutch Republic retains the power to instruct and inform. AUTHOR BIO: American diplomat and historian JOHN LOTHROP MOTLEY (1814-1877) studied law at Harvard and Göttingen, in Germany, where he befriended Otto von Bismarck. He traveled extensively in Europe, frequently in the diplomatic service, but he is remembered primarily for his literary output of historical essays and criticism, political pamphlets, and novels. Oliver Wendell Holmes presented his biography in 1879 under the title John Lothrop Motley: A Memoir.
Comments: (4)
Fesho
Motley is the premier historian of early Dutch history. Although this is the "student" version it is extremely detailed and brings the Dutch quest for independence to life. His characterization of William the Silent ranks with C. V. Wedgwood's classic biography. The Duke of Alva's cruel tyranny and the activities of the Council of Blood (one of whose members habitually slept through heresy trials, awaking only to call for the death penalty) are related in hair-raising detail. Motley roots for the Dutch, but on reading the facts no one would blame him. An excellent read..
Fenrikasa
There are a zillion versions of this book on Amazon, but the one I read is a three volume tome with 1,783 pages in toto. And I will admit that I first started it in July, 2010, and aborted it as way too biased. Got maybe 50 pages in. But after a second trip to The Netherlands lasting three weeks, I decided to pick it up again. And am so very glad I did. Especially after I discovered that Will Durant in his famous, respected, histories, refers to Motley again and again. This was first published in 1855, and was the version I read, the University of Chicago having all three volumes in the original edition. Which had wonderful pictures to add to its understanding.

May I say how much I enjoyed it. Almost reads like a novel, suspenseful and exciting. Of course, Motley does look upon the Prince of Orange as not much less than God, and other things may or may not be exaggerated, but on the whole, probably truthful, and very, very detailed, with many footnotes, most of which are not in English, which seemed strange. Did people in 1855 know Latin, Spanish, German, French, Spanish, Dutch? You most certainly needed all these languages to read the footnotes. The second volume closes at the end of 1574, the third with the Death of William of Orange. Who must be likened to our own George Washington. The Dutch would not finally free themselves from Spain until 1648, hence the term The Eighty Years War. Knowing the geography of the country helps enormously. How truly evil was the Duke of Alva, the tortures and killings were almost unbearable to read about. Phillip, ruler of Spain, was just plain mad, I thought. Always interesting, very readable style. Because this was written 157 years ago, I would assume that additional facts have now come to light. And I do wonder what the Dutch themselves think of this work.
Lilegha
TO be precise: this is to comment on the edition offered here: The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1855: 1572 Chapter VII

This is a 32-page, single chapter exerpt from a 3-volume work that is public domain (available for free on Proj. Gutenberg) and to ask 6.95 for it is in my opinion unethical and deceptive.

This shouldn't be on Amazon.
Groll
Harvard graduate Motley traveled in the early 1800s from the U.S.to Europe where he studied in Germany, followed by a short stint as diplomat in Russia. Although he would become a leading diplomat in later years, he first turned to literary activities, of which The Rise of the Dutch Republic played a major role. Published in 1856 it became very popular among European and American readers and was translated in many languages,including Dutch and Russian.

This work not only describes the history of Holland in colorful and eloquent terms and with a sense of sympathy for the Dutch, but also instructs in well documented ways how the Dutch built their Republic and a political system which still today influences Dutch society. Moreover it offers lessons to a modernday world which continues to grapple with dictatorships, disfunctional governments and failed states. This book is clearly a landmark in literary and historical terms, and a delight to read for those interested in Dutch history as well as readers more generally interested in history and its links to today's societies.