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eBook Work, Gender, and Family in Victorian England download

by Karl Ittmann

eBook Work, Gender, and Family in Victorian England download ISBN: 0814737560
Author: Karl Ittmann
Publisher: NYU Press (February 1, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 1
ePub: 1347 kb
Fb2: 1828 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf lrf docx rtf
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Start by marking Work, Gender, And Family In Victorian England as Want to Read .

Start by marking Work, Gender, And Family In Victorian England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This uncoupling of sexuality and reproduction sent shock waves through western societies that still resonate today. Many of these same issues have appeared in the contemporary American debate over family values.

This book should be of interest to all specialists in Victorian social history

This book should be of interest to all specialists in Victorian social history.

This book should be of interest to all specialists in Victorian social history.

Автор: Karl Ittmann Название: Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England Издательство: Springer . This book reveals that two evolutionary and political traditions developed in England in the wake of the 1832 Reform Act: one Malthusian, the other decidedly anti-Malthusian.

This book reveals that two evolutionary and political traditions developed in England in the wake of the 1832 Reform Act: one Malthusian, the other decidedly anti-Malthusian.

Work Gender and Family in Victorian England Studies in Gender History Pdf. Carl P. Загрузка.

In Victorian families, the father himself was the worker of the family. His responsibility was to be the bread winner. He would likely work very long hours. However, when returning to the home he frequently had a room referred to as the study

In Victorian families, the father himself was the worker of the family. However, when returning to the home he frequently had a room referred to as the study. This was a location that he would go if he needed some peace and quiet. The children were frequently not allowed in the study without special permission from the father. The mother did not carry the same role that women did of the 1950s. Although they rarely worked, they did not spend their time cooking and washing clothes.

Karl Ittmann's analysis of Bradford pushes forward our knowledge of the quiet revolution in social habits which took place in the late nineteenth century. This book should be of interest to all specialists in Victorian social history.

Work, Gender, and Family in Victorian England. New York: New York University Press. Work, Gender, and Family in Victorian England.

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Work, Gender and Family in Victorian England. The development of Bradford produced two distinctive ways of life in the nineteenth century - one working class and located in the central part of the city and the other middle class and safely tucked away in the surrounding hillsides. In mid-Victorian Bradford, as elsewhere in England, the rise of industry forced people to find a new vocabulary to express what was new and distinctive about their world.

At a time when historians are reaching for new approaches to understanding the hidden life of working-class European families, this study of family life and work explores some of social history's most pressing questions in a compelling and lucid way.--Leslie Page MochUniversity of Michigan, Flint

As the industrial revolution swept through towns and villages, it radically altered traditional ways of life, dramatically transforming the family unit. The greater economic and social role of women, the changing relationship between parents and children, and the decline of masculine power all played a role in the perceived crisis of the family. Increases in crime, infanticide, abortion, poverty, and the use of birth control all heightened the concern about the destruction of the family.

By the late nineteenth century, communities throughout Europe and the United States witnessed a deliberate limitation of family size. This fall in family size resulted, Karl Ittman argues, not from newfound prosperity or the universality of Victorian values, but rather from the need for families to protect themselves from the uncertainties of modern life. This uncoupling of sexuality and reproduction sent shock waves through western societies that still resonate today. Many of these same issues have appeared in the contemporary American debate over family values.

Focusing on West Yorkshire, England, in the latter half of the 19th century, Ittman illuminates the many social, personal, and familial crises brought on by the industrial revolution.