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by Alexis Troubetzkoy

eBook A Brief History of the Crimean War: History's Most Unnecessary Struggle download ISBN: 0786718307
Author: Alexis Troubetzkoy
Publisher: Running Press (November 22, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1990 kb
Fb2: 1256 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw lrf lrf mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Few wars in history reveal more confusion of purpose or have had greater unintended . This was a perfectly ok history of the Crimean War.

Few wars in history reveal more confusion of purpose or have had greater unintended consequences. I get distrustful of history books that tell me in one paragraph how weak and terrible the French navy is, but then in the very next one, how Britain had to hustle to the Black Sea because France was doing such a great job on the blockade and they might steal all the glory. 6) Don't make amazing claims and then not back it up! In one spot, the author says that the Franco-Prussian War, World War I, and World War II originated from the Crimean War. Well, if that's the case, not really History's Most Unnecessary Struggle.

However, the book entitled 'The Crimean War' spends comparatively little time talking about the events that occurred during the actual war. There is an excellent build up to the war, and a good followup summarizing th. . There is an excellent build up to the war, and a good followup summarizing the consequences of the war, but the discussion of the war itself (which is the main point of the book) is disappointingly brief. Yes, this book dedicate half of its pages to explain the causes of this war, which was more an arm wrestle between imperial forces, though on a very strategic location for British purposes of the time

book by Alexis S. Troubetzkoy.

The Crimean War was a medieval conflict fought in a modern age. But what is rarely appreciated, and what this historical examination shows, is that this extraordinary and costly struggle was fought not only in the Crimea, but also along the Danube, in the Arctic Ocean, in the Baltic and Pacific. Few wars in history reveal greater confusion of purpose or have had richer unintended consequences. Much has been written about this most senseless of wars and this new history does not aim to cover old ground.

Few wars in history reveal greater confusion of purpose or have had richer unintended consequences. Instead, it traces the war's causes and sketches a vivid picture of the age which made it possible, up until the moment of the Allies' departure for the Crimea.

April 28, 2011 History. History's Most Unnecessary Struggle. A Brief History of the Crimean War. Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. by Alexis Troubetzkoy. Published November 1, 2006 by Carroll & Graf. Instead, it traces the war’s causes and sketches a vivid picture of the age which made it possible, up until the moment of the Allies’ departure for the Crimea.

Books with the subject: Crimean War (1853-1856). A Brief History of the Crimean War: History's Most Unnecessary Struggle - Alexis Troubetzkoy. Crimean war (1853-1856), war-causes. Badge of Glory (The Royal Marines Saga) - Douglas Reeman.

Alexis Troubetzkoy, another Crimean scholar, pithily titled his history of.

Alexis Troubetzkoy, another Crimean scholar, pithily titled his history of the war as a ‘medieval conflict fought in a modern age’. 2 This perhaps best encapsulates the Zeitgeist of the period and the character of the conflict- it truly was a transformative period for society and for the art of warfare. It was a peculiar war that saw as many ‘firsts’ as it did ‘lasts’. The historical significance of the Crimean War is also obscured by what Royle saw as history’s bad joke- the bewildering aspects of the war have often masked its larger importance in the development of modern warfare.

In September 1854, the armies of Britain, France and Turkey invaded Russia in what was to become the Crimean War. In the months that followed over half a million soldiers fell. They died from bullet wounds and shrapnel, cholera and disease, starvation and freezing in a medieval conflict fought in a modern age. But what is rarely appreciated is that this extraordinary struggle was fought not only in the Crimea, but also along the Danube, but in the Arctic Ocean, in the Baltic and Pacific. Few wars in history reveal more confusion of purpose or have had greater unintended consequences. Alexis Troubezkoy's new history traces the causes of this most senseless of wars and sketches a vivid picture of the age which made it possible, interweaving descriptions of the Russian, Turkish and British armies with the principals of the drama — Napoleon III, Marshal St. Arnaud, Lord Raglan, the great Russian engineer Todleban, Florence Nightingale, Nicholas I, and his magnificently terrible Russian empire.
Comments: (7)
Goodman
I knew very little about the Crimean War, or even its causes, but not anymore. This is a wonderfully quick overview of that war which gives a good coverage of its causes without getting bogged down on subjects more adequately covered elsewhere. For example, Florence Nightingale is mentioned, with some praise, in only two sentences I can remember. Even the charge of the British light brigade is covered in a page or two.

But what the book does do is let you understand the many and various, and often stunningly stupid, reasons why a half-million men died world wide.

It was interesting to learn while the British had much of the responsibility for starting this war, the French provided much more of the military assets, especially the soldiers. It even surprised me how many soldiers the Italians provided, though the author didn't cover their actions except to say they were there.

If there is one lesson that war taught, it is don't go into a war with really old generals, especially if they dislike each other.

And a World War II British field marshal once stated, "Amateurs discuss tactics, but professionals discuss logistics." During this war, the British were amateurs. Their disregard for the importance of logistics, food, shelter and health care, cost them thousands of their men. Perhaps it was fitting their commander-in-chief died of disease.
Dianazius
The book provides insight in to the personalities of the key players in the war. The mixture of ego, like Napolian III, attempting to live up to his illustrious uncle's name. Pride, as Tsar Nicolas I feels it is his sole duty to defend Christianity in the Muslim Ottoman empire. The author builds up to the Crimean War in an excellent way; showing clearly how the circumstances and personalities contributed to the war and how easily the situation could have been different and war averted.

It comes down to this. In post Napoleonic Europe, Russia has become the overwhelmingly greatest military power. The other great powers: England, France, Austria respect Nicolas, but fear him and Russia. When Nicolas starts theorizing about how to divide up the Ottoman empire 'when' it fails everyone suspects Nicolas will take Constantinople for himself and control the Bosporus. This will make him an overwhelming force too powerful for western Europe in the eyes of the western countries. The decision is taken to stop Russia and prop up the Ottoman empire as a buffer state to control Russian aggression.

However, the book entitled 'The Crimean War' spends comparatively little time talking about the events that occurred during the actual war. There is an excellent build up to the war, and a good followup summarizing the consequences of the war, but the discussion of the war itself (which is the main point of the book) is disappointingly brief.
MrDog
Yes, this book dedicate half of its pages to explain the causes of this war, which was more an arm wrestle between imperial forces, though on a very strategic location for British purposes of the time. And so, this not very known war it is characterized by the great lost of lives that were the usual of every battle, battles that were fought by pure courage and heroism, using a great deal of artillery -that obliged the soldiers to even dodge cannonballs- and charging the enemy position with cavalry and of course, hand to hand with bayonet. The aftermath of every battle was a sad, shocking experience, certainly it was too much bloodshed that could have been spared, easy to say now, but seems that it was a time when some mediocre empires sought for some objetives by any means ... Oh, those Russians! A good reading considering I was searching for a book with not much detail.
Sirara
This volume spends half of its already slim 300 pages just leading up to the conflict. Given inconsistencies in the remainder of the material however I question the veracity of the seemingly excellent introductory material. For instance, in discussing the Baltic naval campaign, first the author mentions that the French were only able to contribute one ship to begin with as they were otherwise entirely tied up in the Mediterranean. Mere pages later however there is mention of an entire French fleet. Furthermore, in discussing the intended landing on the Crimean peninsula, first the author mentions the mouth of Katcha river, but later says the landing is set for Eupatoria much further up Kalamita Bay, and indeed the site of the actual landing. At least there is a map showing the detail of the Crimean coast; the only other map is of the entire Black Sea, though the author continually points out the other theaters of the war, such as the Baltic naval engagements alluded to above, for which a map would have been very useful.
Lbe
I am glad I didn't spend too much time on this book. A very dry read. As the title states, its a very brief introduction - so the history holes in it are huge.
Andromakus
This book is excellent for someone looking to learn the basics of the Crimean war.It is beautiful in its ability to bring to life the economic, political and military circumstances which lead to this war, its also critical of their failures and successes.

Very good book, I highly recommend it to anyone who is a military history buff but knows little about the Crimean war & wish to find a book to "jump start" their further reading into this unique and fascinating conflict of Victorian Era warfare.