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eBook England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales: The Christian Church 1900-2000 (Oxford History of the Christian Church) download

by Keith Robbins

eBook England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales: The Christian Church 1900-2000 (Oxford History of the Christian Church) download ISBN: 0199570310
Author: Keith Robbins
Publisher: Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (January 7, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 544
ePub: 1478 kb
Fb2: 1565 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr azw doc txt
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which have collectively constituted the Christian Church. Particular beliefs, attitudes, policies and structures are located in their social and cultural contexts. Prominent individuals, clerical and lay, are scrutinized.

England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales: The Christian Church 1900-2000 (Oxford History of the Christian Church). England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales: The Christian Church 1900-2000 (Oxford History of the Christian Church). Download (pdf, . 8 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Professor Robins skilfully manages the challenging task of writing a history of the Christian Church in a century of dramatic change, but with significant continuities. This can be commended as a valuable, insightful surveyof the twentieth century. W. M. Jacob, Theology). a worthy addition to the serires of which it is a part.

Keith Robbins, author Emeritus Vice-Chancellor, University of Wales, Lampeter.

The book takes a wide-ranging look at all of the main bodies - Anglican, Free Church, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic - which collectively make up ‘the Christian Church’. Their distinctive beliefs, attitudes, structures, and personalities receive attention, but all are firmly set in social, political, and cultural contexts. The context in which the churches functioned at the beginning of the 20th century, in both Britain and Ireland, was very different from that at its close. Keith Robbins, author Emeritus Vice-Chancellor, University of Wales, Lampeter.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008. November 2009 · Irish historical studies: joint journal of the Irish Historical Society and the Ulster Society for Irish Historical Studies. 75. 978 0 19 826371 5. Article in The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 61(04):878-879 · October 2010. Cite this publication. England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales: The Christian Church, 1900-2000.

Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Oxford History of the Christian Church). Eugenio F. Biagini (a1).

First published in 1945, Church Life in England in the Thirteenth Century provides a social history of the medieval English church

First published in 1945, Church Life in England in the Thirteenth Century provides a social history of the medieval English church.

Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which have collectively constituted the Christian Church.

The formal history of the Church of England is traditionally dated by the Church to the Gregorian mission to England by Saint Augustine of Canterbury in AD 597. As a result of Augustine's mission, and based on the tenets of Christianity, Christi. As a result of Augustine's mission, and based on the tenets of Christianity, Christianity in England fell under control or authority of the Pope. This gave him the power to appoint bishops, preserve or change doctrine, and/or grant exceptions to standard doctrine.

Keith Robbins, building on his previous writing on the modern history of the interlocking but distinctive territories of the British Isles, takes a wide-ranging, innovative and challenging look at the twentieth-century history of the main bodies, at once national and universal, which have collectively constituted the Christian Church. The protracted search for elusive unity is emphasized. Particular beliefs, attitudes, policies and structures are located in their social and cultural contexts. Prominent individuals, clerical and lay, are scrutinized. Religion and politics intermingle, highlighting, for churches and states, fundamental questions of identity and allegiance, of public and private values, in a century of ideological conflict, violent confrontation (in Ireland), two world wars and protracted Cold War. The massive change experienced by the countries and people of the Isles since 1900 has encompassed shifting relationships between England, Ireland (and Northern Ireland), Scotland and Wales, the end of the British Empire, the emergence of a new Europe and, latterly, major immigration of adherents of Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism and other faiths from outside Europe: developments scarcely conceivable at the outset. Such a broad contextual perspective provides an essential background to understanding the puzzling ambiguities evident both in secularization and enduring Christian faith. Robbins provides a cogent and compelling overview of this turbulent century for the churches of the Isles.