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by Peter Marshall

eBook Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England download ISBN: 0198207735
Author: Peter Marshall
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 26, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 360
ePub: 1144 kb
Fb2: 1373 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw doc docx doc
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead.

This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead. Protestant reformers insisted vehemently that between heaven and hell there was no 'middle place' of purgatory where the souls of the departed could be assisted by the prayers of those still living on earth. This was no remote theological proposition, but a revolutionary doctrine affecting the lives of all sixteenth-century English people, and the ways in which their Church and society were organized.

Beliefs and the Dead represents the state of the art. This is intellectual history of the finest kind, grounded in evidence, conscious of chronology . Peter Marshall is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Warwick. This is intellectual history of the finest kind, grounded in evidence, conscious of chronology, and sensitive to social and cultural setting. -Renaissance Quarterly.

Start by marking Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England as Want to Read . This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead.

Start by marking Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This was no remote theo This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead.

Peter Marshall, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Warwick. Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England

Peter Marshall, Senior Lecturer in History, University of Warwick. Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England. Shortlisted for the Longman/History Today award 2003. This is a book with a wide compass and a wealth of interesting topics. How people in early modern England thought they could relate to the dead is the subject of Peter Marshall's insightful and luminously written Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England.

Request PDF On Jan 1, 2003, Christian Grosse and others published Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England . January 1992 · Comparative Drama. Cecile Williamson Cary.

Cecile Williamson Cary. Hardy’s Wessex, Heritage Culture, and the Archaeology of Rural England. December 2009 · Nineteenth Century Contexts. Parties, agents and electoral culture in England, 1880–1910. May 2018 · Parliaments.

16 18 Peter Marshall, Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England, Oxford University Press, 1964,Pp. 17. Revisionist scholarship on these themes has tended to stress the seamless dovetailing of self-interest and altrusim, and the reciprocal character of a flow of spiritual and material benefits between living and dead members of the community. albeit many were reported to have taken his words for true and been much distressed by them

Recent studies of the English Reformation have moved beyond the political and administrative implications of the break with Rome to explore . The dead occupied a central place in the theology and the liturgy of the medieval church.

Recent studies of the English Reformation have moved beyond the political and administrative implications of the break with Rome to explore the transformation of popular belief and practice in the wake of a deep theological upheaval. And nowhere was the shift in theological perspective of greater importance, nowhere did it have greater implications for daily practice, than in popular beliefs about the dead. In chapter 1 the author discusses the multiple claims that the dead imposed on the living, how the living were, in effect, constantly in the service of the dead.

Peter Marshall, Senior Lecturer in History at Warwick University, traces the theological tensions that arose from the decline of the doctrines of purgatory and intercession for the dead during and after the Reformation. Tait's book is the only one of the three that considers the process of dying in detail. Dr. Tait argues that to the modern mind, dying represents failure, whereas for many in medieval and early modern Ireland dying could be a triumph. But dying also had a moral ambivalence in early modern society.

See our disclaimer This book illuminates the (sometimes ambivalent) attitudes towards the dead to be discerned in pre-Reformation religious culture, and traces (up to about 1630) the uncertain.

Beliefs and the Dead in Reformation England This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead. This book illuminates the (sometimes ambivalent) attitudes towards the dead to be discerned in pre-Reformation religious culture, and traces (up to about 1630) the uncertain progress of the 'reformation of the dead' attempted by Protestant authorities, as they sought both to stamp out traditional rituals and to provide the replacements acceptable in an increasingly fragmented religious world.

This is the first comprehensive study of one of the most important aspects of the Reformation in England: its impact on the status of the dead. Protestant reformers insisted vehemently that between heaven and hell there was no 'middle place' of purgatory where the souls of the departed could be assisted by the prayers of those still living on earth. This was no remote theological proposition, but a revolutionary doctrine affecting the lives of all sixteenth-century English people, and the ways in which their Church and society were organized. This book illuminates the (sometimes ambivalent) attitudes towards the dead to be discerned in pre-Reformation religious culture, and traces (up to about 1630) the uncertain progress of the 'reformation of the dead' attempted by Protestant authorities, as they sought both to stamp out traditional rituals and to provide the replacements acceptable in an increasingly fragmented religious world. It also provides detailed surveys of Protestant perceptions of the afterlife, of the cultural meanings of the appearance of ghosts, and of the patterns of commemoration and memory which became characteristic of post-Reformation England. Together these topics constitute an important case-study in the nature and tempo of the English Reformation as an agent of social and cultural transformation. The book speaks directly to the central concerns of current Reformation scholarship, addressing questions posed by 'revisionist' historians about the vibrancy and resilience of traditional religious culture, and by 'post-revisionists' about the penetration of reformed ideas. Dr Marshall demonstrates not only that the dead can be regarded as a significant 'marker' of religious and cultural change, but that a persistent concern with their status did a great deal to fashion the distinctive appearance of the English Reformation as a whole, and to create its peculiarities and contradictory impulses.