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eBook Norway 1940 download

by Joseph Kynoch

eBook Norway 1940 download ISBN: 1840373806
Author: Joseph Kynoch
Publisher: The Crowood Press; 1st edition (April 9, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1711 kb
Fb2: 1441 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx lit azw mbr
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

Author:Kynoch, Joseph. Norway 1940: The Forgotten Fiasco. Book Binding:Hardback. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard. World of Books USA was founded in 2005.

Author:Kynoch, Joseph. Norway 1940 : The Forgotten Fiasco by Joseph Kynoch (2005, Hardcover). Напишите отзыв первым Об этом товаре.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Almost two-thousand British soldiers landed in Norway during the evening of April 18th, 1940.

Published April 9, 2005 by The Crowood Press.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Norway 1940 from your list? Norway 1940. Published April 9, 2005 by The Crowood Press.

Joseph Kynoch was called up in 1939 into the 2/5 Battalion of the Royal Leicester Regiment

Joseph Kynoch was called up in 1939 into the 2/5 Battalion of the Royal Leicester Regiment. After taking part in the Norwegian Campaign, he retrained as a vehicle mechanic and served in REME until 1945, with the 14th Army in India and Assam.

MyHeritage Family Trees. Joseph Kynoch, 1859 - 1930 Joseph Kynoch 18591930. Joseph Kynoch 1859Joseph Kynoch in Scotland, Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950. Joseph Kynoch was born on month day 1859, at birth place. Joseph married Elizabeth May Kynoch (born Milne) on month day 1875, at age 16 at marriage place. Elizabeth was born on February 17 1857, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Joseph Kynoch was born on month day 1859, at birth place, to Francis Kynoch and Margaret Rae. Elizabeth Milne Joseph Kynoch in Scotland, Marriages, 1561-1910. Elizabeth Milne married Joseph Kynoch on month day 1875, at marriage place.

Robert D. Beeman; John B. Allen (2005). Blue Book of Airguns. Drew, Kynoch (1940). Kynoch Press Diaries". Art and Industry: 73–9. Blue Book Publications. p. 295. ISBN 1-886768-56-0. The Trust Movement In British Industry. The Chemical Industries. Archived 2007-08-29 at the Wayback Machine Batoche Books. Bourke, Edward (1998). Shipwrecks of the Irish Coast.

Cover pic from the book 'Norway 1940'. uk: Joseph Kynoch: Books. Steve Foster Senior Member. Spike, Thanks for your sketches and drawings from Joseph Kynock's book which I have read. There is a debate whether the platoon marching away from Tretten station is from 8th Foresters or 5th Leicesters. If you look on page 3 of this thread, Dadbilly's recognised his father, William Burton, (who is still alive) at the rear of that platoon. William Burton was a Forester. I am pretty certain it is a Forester's platoon. Kynnock's book also has other inaccuracies.

Kynoch was a manufacturer of ammunition, later incorporated into ICI but remaining as a brand name for sporting cartridges

Kynoch was a manufacturer of ammunition, later incorporated into ICI but remaining as a brand name for sporting cartridges. The firm of Pursall and Phillips operated a 'percussion cap manufactory' at Whittall Street, in Birmingham, in the mid 19th century. In 1856, Scottish entrepreneur George Kynoch joined the company. An explosion in 1859 destroyed the works, killing 19 of the 70 employees.

Though Norway was strictly neutral, in April 1940 Britain and France mined Norwegian territorial waters to prevent supplies from reaching Germany

In the late 1930s, as Europe moved toward war, the peaceful kingdom of Norway found itself strategically vital to the interests of Germany, France, and Great Britain. Though Norway was strictly neutral, in April 1940 Britain and France mined Norwegian territorial waters to prevent supplies from reaching Germany. ately, the German Reich invaded the militarily weak Norway. Norway 1940 shows the country fighting valiantly, assisted by the Allies in a two-month campaign that has become a textbook example of confused aims and faulty coordination.

Redirected from Kynoch Press). The Kynoch Press was an English-based fine press in Witton, Birmingham founded, in 1876 as a company press for Kynoch, a British manufacturer of ammunition. Initially, the press was used to print packaging. The press closed in 1981.

Almost two-thousand British soldiers landed in Norway during the evening of April 18th, 1940. On May 2nd, one hundred and sixty three men were rescued by the Royal Navy from one of the most ill-planned operations of World War II. Joseph Kynoch is one of the few soldiers who can still remember the campaign that first brought British troops into battle with Hitler's new army - an army blooded on the battlefields of Poland and well equipped with the most modern weaponry and supported by highly effective air cover. The North-west Expeditionary Force (Codename Sickleforce) was 1,000 men short when it set sail in two coasters for the 500 mile crossing of the North Sea. Two battalions set forth, Leicesters and Sherwood Foresters, and on landing they found much of their equipment had been misdirected or lost. The German Army Group 'Pellengahr' was already established in Southern Norway, the western coastal towns and Trondheim in the North. When the British landed the Germans were already marching north to meet them, pushing the Norwegian Army backwards. These were the first British troops to understand the word Blitzkrieg, but the British Expeditionary Force in France would suffer the same fate, albeit on a larger scale - and the town of Dunkirk would take on a new significance.
Comments: (2)
net rider
This book chronicles the ground fighting in central Norway by British forces from mid-April to early May 1940. It does this through the author's own recollections, as well as from diary entries and personal accounts from dozens of British eyewitnesses. It has a wealth of useful maps, and some decent photo images.

I recommend this book only if you already have solid knowledge of the Norway campaign, and are willing to slog through text of widely varying quality. At times the narrative jumps around, and it can be difficult to separate Mr. Kynoch's eyewitness observations from the general narrative and accounts from different observers. There are numerous small errors. For example, the caption of a photo on p. x refers to "Cruiser HMS Sheffield" when the vessel is a cruiser of the smaller Arethusa class. The image p. 151 really is the Sheffield. On p. 148, an eyewitness account from a sailor aboard the cruiser Birmingham suddenly becomes the author's own account, without a proper change in pattern to indicate the shift in perspective.

Don't let these flaws fool you though. This book is a gem of information, and is in places an exciting, compelling read. British infantry fought panzers with near-worthless Boys antitank rifles and log roadblocks - the 148 Brigade had no artillery and not a single true antitank gun. The men were out of supply, literally starving, as they fought the disastrous delaying action at Tretten. 148 Brigade was made up of under-trained and inexperienced troops, but they fought well considering their lack of equipment, lack of bullets, and want of simple food.

The book gives a good summary of what went wrong with Britain's tentative incursion in central Norway. Ships risked air attacks and U-boats to deliver 4-inch shells that were useless for the army's 3.7-inch AA guns. Soldiers learned not to fire their Bren guns at aircraft because the tracer ammunition with which they had been erroneously supplied gave away their position. There was nowhere to dig in with the ground frozen and waist-deep snow all around. The British had nobody who spoke Norwegian, and precious few Norwegians spoke English. The two armies co-existed rather than fighting together.

Mr. Kynoch has done a service to history by recording his and others' accounts of a campaign that has been little chronicled and mostly forgotten. Anyone who doubts the importance of logistics and planning in war should be required to read this sad, humorous, and memorable account.
Villo
Good history of a little known campaign of WW II. Highlights the lack of unit training of early UK fights