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by John Bew

eBook Castlereagh: Enlightenment, War and Tyranny download ISBN: 0857381865
Author: John Bew
Publisher: Quercus; First Edition edition (November 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 722
ePub: 1522 kb
Fb2: 1834 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: lit txt mobi azw
Category: History
Subcategory: Europe

John Bew tells the story of Castlereagh from the French Revolution through the Irish rebellion, the Napoleonic Wars, the diplomatic power struggles of 1814-5 and the mental breakdown that ended his life. He paints a magisterial portrait not only of his subject but the tumultuous times in which he acted.

John Bew's fascinating biography restores the statesman to his place in history, offering a. .

John Bew's fascinating biography restores the statesman to his place in history, offering a nuanced picture of a shy, often inarticulate figure whose mind captured the complexity of the European Enlightenment unlike any other. Skillfully balancing the dimensions of Castlereagh's intellectual life with his Irish heritage, Bew's definitive work brings Castleragh alive in all his complexity, variety, and depth.

Free 2-day shipping John Bew's biography of Castlereagh details why he was so disliked by Whigs . liamfoley, December 9, 2011.

John Bew's biography of Castlereagh details why he was so disliked by Whigs and Irish Nationalists alike but goes a long way to rehabilitating Britain's greatest Foreign Secretary (and best Prime Minister She never had).

By John Bew. London, Quercus, 2011. There were many differences and similarities between the settlements of 1816 and 1919, but one similarity is particularly relevant to John Bew's masterful biography of Lord Castlereagh: the popular views of the purposes and conduct of both wars and the political and military leaders who led them were created by poets, artists, writers and intellectuals, and these views were virtually all wrong. It has taken historians two centuries to redress the grossly erroneous views that informed the public.

John Bew is Professor in History and Foreign Policy at King's College London and from 2013 to 2014 held the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the John W. Kluge Center. His most recent book is about Realpolitik: A History in 2016 published by Oxford University Press. In 2019, Bew joined the Number 10 Policy Unit under Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

John Bew teaches History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King's College London. He was the winner of the 2015 Philip Leverhulme Prize for outstanding achievement in Politics and International Studies and previously held the Henry Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations at the Library of Congress in Washington DC. John is a contributing writer at the New Statesman and the author of five books, including the Realpolitik: A History and Castlereagh. He was born in Belfast, educated at Cambridge, and lives in Wimbledon, London

In this book, John Bew tells the story of Castlereagh from the French Revolution through the Irish rebellion, the Napoleonic Wars . John Bew is Deputy Director of ICSR and Lecturer in War Studies at King's College London

In this book, John Bew tells the story of Castlereagh from the French Revolution through the Irish rebellion, the Napoleonic Wars, the diplomatic power struggles of 1814-5 and the mental breakdown that ended his life. John Bew paints a portrait not only of his subject but the tumultuous times in which he acted. John Bew is Deputy Director of ICSR and Lecturer in War Studies at King's College London. Prior to this, bewteen 2007 and 2010 he was Lecturer in Modern British History, Harris Fellow and Director of Studies at Peterhouse, Cambridge University.

John S. Russia’s Crimean War .

Castlereagh: Enlightened Conservative. Few figures in British political history have endured such lingering hostility as the statesman who did so much to forge Europe’s post-Napoleonic settlement, says John Bew. John Bew Published in History Today Volume 61 Issue 11 November 2011. No British statesman of the 19th century reached the same level of international influence as Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh (1769-1822), or, at least, none won as much respect from the great powers of Europe or in the United States.

Varying Form of Title: Enlightenment, war and tyranny. Download book Castlereagh : enlightenment, war and tyranny, John Bew. online for free. Publication, Distribution, et. London.

No British statesman of the nineteenth century reached the same level of international fame as Lord Castlereagh, or won as much respect from the great powers of Europe or America. Yet no British statesman has been so maligned by his contemporaries or hated by the public. His career took him from the brutal suppression of a bloody rebellion in Ireland to the splendour of Vienna and Paris. He imprisoned his former friends, abolished the Irish parliament, created the biggest British army in history, and redrew the map of Europe. At a time when the West turns from idealism to realism in its foreign policy, Castlereagh's reputation is being revived. Yet neither his detractors nor his defenders have truly understood this shy, inarticulate but sometimes passionate man. In this book, John Bew tells the story of Castlereagh from the French Revolution through the Irish rebellion, the Napoleonic Wars, the diplomatic power struggles of 1814-5 and the mental breakdown that ended his life. John Bew paints a magisterial portrait not only of his subject but the tumultuous times in which he acted. Rather than the tyrant of legend, Castlereagh was a man whose mind captured the complexity of the European Enlightenment as much as any other. His mind was conservative and enlightened at the same time - and no less the one for being the other.
Comments: (7)
Watikalate
This majestic book argues for a sympathetic understanding of an Irish-British statesman whom popular history condemns as a reactionary, uneducated tyrant. The picture that emerges is of a man of enormous common sense and great political talent who, because he was not a great speaker, was (as someone has suggested) "the first person demonized by the Liberal media". He was a college drop-out, if you will, which made him an obvious target for the intelligentsia of the Left. In judging his achievements, a comparison with Churchill is instructive: they were similar in both being point men who were successful in assembling a coalition to defeat a dictator in Europe, and in keeping Russia out of western Europe. They were different in that Churchill was a dazzling Parliamentary speaker with the common touch; Castlereagh was mediocre on his feet and never played to the man of the street.
The fluency of prose and the narrative drive of this book make it impossible to put down once begun. It avoids the common error of historical biographies to pad the story with long descriptions of contemporary events. For instance, the Battle of Waterloo is dealt with here in four sentences. The focus of the book is always on Castlereagh; he is in every scene, and he is meticulously examined from every angle, taking into account all the written opinions of him during his life and after.
You finish this book with two senses of pleasure - one, of having read a really good book, and,two, of having met someone who would never have been a close friend, but would have been a gentlemen who earned your greatest respect.
Skyway
A favorable yet balanced biography of the controversial British statesman and leading foreign minister of the early 19th century, Lord Castlereagh.

Why invest the time to read this doorstop book? To know more about how Ireland was politically joined to England; as a reminder of the stupidity of George III; to see how the Great Powers organized themselves to corral Napoleon and deal with his chaotic aftermath; to discover how Wellington was placed in command; to gain insights into the workings of the parliamentarian politics of the day; and, to be made aware of the details of the life and death of its subject, a now somewhat forgotten figure.

John Bew, the author, with his well-researched book, has provided me with a fine history of Castlereagh and, indirectly, to a better understanding of the political antecedents to some of the stresses within today's European Union.
lacki
A fine blend of politics, society, military history and a detailed look at an impenetrable mind. Fine work, Sir. You have done him justice.
lolike
This book is clearly and objectively written about a pivotal figure in Regency Britain. Anyone interested in Irish/English history or the history of the Europe during the wars against Napoleon Bonaparte should read this book. Much is to be learned from it about world politics today. I came away admiring a man who more than anything wanted to serve and made great personal sacrifices to do so!
BlackHaze
excellent
Rose Of Winds
This is a very thorough, well researched, well written history of Castlereagh. It includes personal details of his life that answered many questions for me as to his personality, his relationship with his wife, etc. It also covers in great detail his journey from Whig to Tory and why he made that change.

The book also gives Castlereagh well-deservered credit for the fine work he did in Vienna and in Paris on behalf of his nation and Europe. This book is a must have on the research shelf for anyone interested in the Penninsular War, the Napoleonic Era, the Irish Rebellion and other great moments at this turning point in history.
Thohelm
interesting person good read good price
Well written a pelasure to read.